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  1. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva.Emma Borg - forthcoming - Hypatia.
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  2. Moira Gatens, Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality.R. Diprose - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  3. Foucault, Rape, and the Construction of the Feminine Body.Alfred H. Fuchs - forthcoming - Hypatia.
  4. The Body and Embodiment: A Philosophical Guide.Frank Chouraqui - 2021 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Perfect for use at advanced undergraduate and graduate level, this is the first text to offer students a unified narrative regarding the place of the body in Western thinking. The body is simultaneously active and passive, powerful and vulnerable and as such, it fundamentally informs ontological, political, ethical and epistemological issues.
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  5. We Are Not Born Submissive: How Patriarchy Shapes Women's Lives.Manon Garcia - 2021 - Princeton, NJ, USA: Princeton University Press.
    What role do women play in the perpetuation of patriarchy? On the one hand, popular media urges women to be independent, outspoken, and career-minded. Yet, this same media glorifies a specific, sometimes voluntary, female submissiveness as a source of satisfaction. In philosophy, even less has been said on why women submit to men and the discussion has been equally contradictory—submission has traditionally been considered a vice or pathology, but female submission has been valorized as innate to women’s nature. Is there (...)
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  6. The Trangender Reader: Language, Law, Sport & Reality.Miroslav Imbrisevic - 2021 - In THE TRANSGENDER READER: Language, Law, Sport & Reality. A Collection of Essays. Worthing, UK: pp. 1-64.
    Contents: 1. Testosterone is not the only Game in Town: The Transgender Woman Athlete 2. Queer Language Lessons: The Confusion over ‘My Pronouns’ 3. Legal Fictions: Changing Sex by Changing Gender 4. More than a Feeling: Rock Stars, Heroines and Transwomen 5. To Compete, or not to Compete, that is the Question: Which is Nobler for Transwomen Athletes? 6. The Power of Words 7. Feminism, Conceptual Engineering, and Trans Identit.
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  7. Abjection and mourning in the struggle over fetal remains.Brittany R. Leach - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):141-164.
    Should the remains of aborted fetuses be treated as human corpses or medical waste? How can feminists defend abortion rights without erasing the experiences of women who mourn fetal death or lending support to pro-life constructions of fetal personhood? To answer these questions, I trace the role of abjection and mourning in debates over fetal remains disposal regulations. Critiquing pro-life views of fetal personhood while challenging feminists to develop richer and more compelling accounts of fetal remains, I argue that embracing (...)
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  8. Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.Ásta Sveinsdóttir & Kim Q. Hall (eds.) - 2021
    This exciting new Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary state of the field in feminist philosophy. The editors' introduction and forty-five essays cover feminist critical engagements with philosophy and adjacent scholarly fields, as well as feminist approaches to current debates and crises across the world. Authors cover topics ranging from the ways in which feminist philosophy attends to other systems of oppression, and the gendered, racialized, and classed assumptions embedded in philosophical concepts, to feminist perspectives on prominent subfields (...)
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  9. Agency, Environmental Scaffolding, and the Development of Eating Disorders - Commentary on Rodemeyer.Joel Krueger & Lucy Osler - 2020 - In Time and Body: Phenomenological and Psychopathological Approaches. Cambridge: pp. 256-262.
  10. Ending Sex-Based Oppression: Transitional Pathways.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2020 - Philosophia 49 (3):1021-1041.
    From a radical feminist perspective, gender is a cage. Or to be more precise, it’s two cages. If genders are cages, then surely we want to let people out. Being less constrained in our choices is something we all have reason to want: theorists in recent years have emphasized the importance of the capability to do and be many different things. At the very least, we should want an end to sex-based oppression. But what does this entail, when it comes (...)
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  11. Viral Queerings, Amplified Vulnerabilities.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - In Jussi Koitela & Yvonne Billimor (eds.), Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2. Berlin: pp. 155-172.
    From Editors' Introduction: "With our invitation to turn over (re-turn) hospitality in these times Marietta Radomska’s response combines her own research within the emerging field of Queer Death Studies6 with a detailed reading of the coronavirus disease pandemic. In her essay, “Viral queerings, amplified vulnerabilities”, Marietta seeks to subvert normative and simplified understandings of our present. Following the thread that the pandemic affects some bodies more than others, Marietta highlights how “the exploitation and degradation of nature mixed with intensifying socio-economic (...)
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  12. Quotas: Enabling Conscientious Objection to Coexist with Abortion Access.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 29 (2):154-169.
    The debate regarding the role of conscientious objection in healthcare has been protracted, with increasing demands for curbs on conscientious objection. There is a growing body of evidence that indicates that in some cases, high rates of conscientious objection can affect access to legal medical services such as abortion—a major concern of critics of conscientious objection. Moreover, few solutions have been put forward that aim to satisfy both this concern and that of defenders of conscientious objection—being expected to participate in (...)
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  13. Beauvoirian Androgyny: Reflections on the Androgynous World of Fraternité in The Second Sex.Megan M. Burke - 2019 - Feminist Theory 20 (1):3-18.
    This article considers Beauvoir’s gesture towards fraternité at the end of The Second Sex by focusing on her fleeting characterisation of this future as ‘an androgynous world’. Generally, either Beauvoir’s call for fraternité is dismissed as an erasure of sexual difference and is thus seen to be politically bankrupt, or fraternité is understood to realise sexual difference. This latter reading suggests that androgyny plays no role in Beauvoir’s solution to women’s oppression, while the other view often sees it as one (...)
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  14. Liminal Bodies, Reproductive Health, and Feminist Rhetoric: Searching the Negative Spaces in Histories of Rhetoric by Lydia M. McDermott. [REVIEW]Nicholas Danne - 2019 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 12 (1):172-175.
    Liminal Bodies, Reproductive Health, and Feminist Rhetoric presents composition professor Lydia McDermott's "sonogram" methodology of rhetorical listening, an exercise that discloses feminine voices muted or unjustly disciplined within texts ostensibly written on women's behalf. The texts examined by McDermott range from eighteenth-century pregnancy manuals to speeches by Favorinus, the ancient sophist, who is described from antiquity as a hermaphrodite. Part of McDermott's purpose in sonogramming is to critique modern and contemporary feminists. She objects to the feminist trend of perpetuating and (...)
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  15. Property in the Body and Medical Law.Donna Dickenson - 2019 - In Andelka Phillips (ed.), Philosophical Foundations of Medical Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In common law, the traditional rule has been that there is no property in excised human tissue. In an era of widespread commodification of tissue, however, the practical reasons behind this position are increasingly outdated, while the philosophical grounds are paradoxical. This no-property rule has been construed so as to deprive tissue providers of ongoing rights, whereas researchers, universities, and biotechnology companies are prone to assume that once they acquire proprietary rights, those rights are complete and undifferentiated. That position can (...)
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  16. What a Child Can Teach Us.Maria Fannin - 2019 - In Luce Irigaray, Mahon O’Brien & Christos Hadjioannou (eds.), Towards a New Human Being. Springer Verlag. pp. 17-34.
    Luce Irigaray’s work explores the debt owed to the maternal body and the obscured or derelict figure of the maternal in the Western philosophical tradition. Her writing is deeply concerned with the status of the maternal and with the effort to revalue the maternal at a symbolic level in Western metaphysics and culture. One of the major contributions of her philosophy is its emphasis on the central, yet denigrated, unthought or disregarded bodily dimensions of maternity. Throughout her philosophical oeuvre, Irigaray (...)
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  17. Abortion and Reproduction in Ireland: Shame, Nation-Building and the Affective Politics of Place.Clara Fischer - 2019 - Feminist Review 122 (2):32-48.
    In 2018, Irish citizens voted overwhelmingly to repeal the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution to allow for the introduction of a more liberal abortion law. In this article, I develop a retrospective reading of the stubborn persistence of the denial of reproductive rights to women in Ireland over the decades. I argue that the ban’s severity and longevity is rooted in deep-seated, affective attachments that formed part of processes of postcolonial nation-building and relied on shame and the construction of the (...)
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  18. What Is Body Positivity?Celine Leboeuf - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (2):113-127.
    “Body positivity” refers to the movement to accept our bodies, regardless of size, shape, skin tone, gender, and physical abilities. The movement is often implicitly understood as the effort to celebrate diversity in bodily aesthetics and to expand our narrow beauty standards beyond their present-day confines. Like other feminists, I question whether the push to broaden beauty norms should occupy as central a role as it does now in the movement’s mainstream incarnations, and I believe that, beyond challenging confining beauty (...)
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  19. Anatomy of the Thigh Gap.Céline Leboeuf - 2019 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 5 (1).
    This article explores the ongoing obsession with the thigh gap ideal in certain pockets of Western societies. A thigh gap is the space some women have between their inner thighs when they stand with their feet together. The thigh gap ideal is flaunted on “thinspo” websites, which compile diet and exercise tips and display pictures of fashion models and “real women” in their efforts to inspire women to become thinner. I aim to identify what is wrong with the thigh gap (...)
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  20. Simone de Beauvoir's Feminist Art of Living.Céline Leboeuf - 2019 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (3):448-460.
    This essay aims to motivate a different way of reading Simone de Beauvoir's feminist philosophy than that which has become dominant in Beauvoir scholarship. I wish to argue that we can read Beauvoir as articulating what I will call a "feminist art of living." To substantiate this thesis, I highlight a crucial feature of her art of living—one that is connected to her reflections on the body—namely, what I refer to as Beauvoir's "sensualism." By "sensualism," I have in mind a (...)
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  21. Corps À: Body/Ies in Deconstruction.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2019 - Parallax 25 (1):1-7.
    This essay explores how contemporary works of critical theory and deconstruction can challenge preconceptions of the body and embodiments and interrogate their limits, particularly in relation to intertwined foldings of desire, gender, race and sexuality. It aims to suggest that Jacques Derrida’s acute concern for the question of translation might help challenge and re-configure the conventional dichotomy between understandings of the body either as physical/material or as socio-culturally constructed. The authors then analyse the questions of translation and untranslatability in relation (...)
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  22. À Corps: The Corpus of Deconstruction.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2019 - Parallax 25 (2):111-118.
    This article pursues the exploration of how contemporary works of deconstruction can challenge preconceptions of the body and embodiments and interrogate their limits, particularly in relation to intertwined foldings of desire, gender, race and sexuality. Through readings of Jacques Derrida and Sarah Kofman, the authors show that deconstruction allows for an understanding of the body or bodies that goes beyond the present body — indexed as human, male, white, able, living body — thus opening up towards the thinking of bodies (...)
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  23. HIV Health Care Providers as Street-Level Bureaucrats: Unreflective Discourses and Implications for Women’s Health and Well-Being.Shrivridhi Shukla & Judith L. M. McCoyd - 2019 - Ethics and Social Welfare 13 (2):133-149.
    Client-provider relationships have significant effects on how individuals comprehend their life situation during chronic disease and illness. Yet, little is known about how frontline health care providers (HCPs) influence client’s identity formation through meaning-making with clients such as HIV-positive women living in poverty. This requires ethical consideration of the meanings made between clients and providers about client’s health and well-being, both individually and in the larger society. Health care providers (N = 15) and married women living with HIV (N = (...)
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  24. Revisiting Feminist Matters in the Post-Linguistic Turn: John Dewey, New Materialisms, and Contemporary Feminist Thought.Clara Fischer - 2018 - In Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.), New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment. London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 83-102.
    In this chapter, I sketch some recent developments in feminist thought and present these alongside John Dewey’s work to assess what place pragmatism might assume in debates on contemporary, post-linguistic turn feminism. My task for this chapter is threefold: I redress the elision of pragmatism in the conversation around affect theory, new materialisms, and contemporary feminist theorising; I trace some of the confluences between Dewey’s work on nature and materiality, and the new materialist work of Stacy Alaimo and Karen Barad; (...)
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  25. Contested Terrains: New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment.Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal - 2018 - In Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.), New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment. London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 1-13.
    Feminist theory and philosophy has evinced an ongoing scholarly interest in the body and embodiment. Corporeal feminism, as it has been called by some, theorises the effects of patriarchal power structures on the female body, and hence, on women’s subjectivity and social position. As we progress into the 21st Century, despite several decades of feminist activism and scholarship, women’s bodies continue to be sites of control and contention both materially and symbolically. Issues such as reproductive rights and technologies, sexual violence, (...)
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  26. New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment.Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.) - 2018 - London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan.
    Despite several decades of feminist activism and scholarship, women’s bodies continue to be sites of control and contention both materially and symbolically. Issues such as reproductive technologies, sexual violence, objectification, motherhood, and sex trafficking, among others, constitute ongoing, pressing concerns for women’s bodies in our contemporary milieu, arguably exacerbated in a neoliberal world where bodies are instrumentalized as sites of human capital. This book engages with these themes by building on the strong tradition of feminist thought focused on women’s bodies, (...)
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  27. Monsters of Sex: Foucault and the Problem of Life.Sarah K. Hansen - 2018 - Foucault Studies 24 (2):102-124.
    This article argues, contra-Derrida, that Foucault does not essentialize or precomprehend the meaning of life or bio- in his writings on biopolitics. Instead, Foucault problematizes life and provokes genealogical questions about the meaning of modernity more broadly. In The Order of Things, the 1974-75 lecture course at the Collège de France, and Herculine Barbin, the monster is an important figure of the uncertain shape of modernity and its entangled problems (life, sex, madness, criminality, etc). Engaging Foucault’s monsters, I show that (...)
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  28. Interdependency: The Fourth Existential Insult to Humanity.Tom Malleson - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):160-186.
    Sigmund Freud famously described three existential insults to humanity stemming from heliocentrism, evolution, and psychoanalysis. In recent years we are, perhaps, beginning to see the emergence of a fourth: interdependency. Over the last several centuries, Anglo-American culture has modelled itself on a vision of the independent individual – strong, autonomous, and self-sufficient. Yet from feminist theory, communitarianism, disability theory, institutionalist economics, and elsewhere, the evidence mounts that independence is, in most contexts, a myth. We are, in fact, fundamentally social beings: (...)
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  29. Review of The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy. [REVIEW]Amy Marvin - 2018 - Hypatia Reviews Online 2018.
    The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy presents an exciting, comprehensive, and original pluralist presentation of feminist philosophy that is a much-needed update to existing feminist philosophy companions. Students, scholars, independent researchers, and departments interested in feminism and philosophy would do well to make sure they have access to this volume, and it should be a relevant resource for years to come. Reviewing such an expansive presentation of feminist philosophy across differences also raises considerations about the meanings and limits of pluralism (...)
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  30. Dancing Feminist Conversations: Never Without Materiality.Dana Mills & Sarah Drews Lucas - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):241-249.
  31. Microbiopolitics in Art: Joyful Acts of Insurrection.Mariana Pérez Bobadilla - 2018 - Technoetic Arts 16 (3):303-313.
    This article explores projects of art and biology as joyful acts of insurrection. It presents critical and creative perspectives to generate alternative structures of subjec-tivity. These alternative structures gain relevance when intersectional variables of privilege and discrimination as political tools are set in crisis by a postanthropocen-tric awareness. The thesis of this article is that in order to understand and develop postanthropocentric intersectional positions, the microbial posthuman joins thecartographies of the posthuman as a material possibility from microscopic biologicalmatter and philosophical (...)
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  32. Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life.Marietta Radomska - 2018 - Somatechnics 8 (2):215-231.
    In the Western cultural imaginaries the monstrous is defined – following Aristotelian categorisations – by its excess, deficiency or displacement of organic matter. These characteristics come to the fore in the field of bioart: a current in contemporary art that involves the use of biological materials (various kinds of soma: cells, tissues, organisms), and scientific procedures, technologies, protocols, and tools. Bioartistic projects and objects not only challenge the conventional ideas of embodiment and bodily boundaries, but also explore the relation between (...)
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  33. Should Pregnancy Be Considered a Disability?Devora Shapiro - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (1):91-105.
    Individuals with disabilities face significant challenges, both physically and socially. To claim a disability, therefore, is not something one ought to do lightly. Pregnancy, however, presents a very difficult and interesting case. Pain, discomfort, and inconvenience are often daily aspects of pregnancy, and pregnancy itself can cause physical, as well as social, impediments that can substantially interfere with one's day-to-day work and life. In practice, based on our current laws concerning family leave, ailments brought on by pregnancy can be cited (...)
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  34. Kant's Moral Theory and Feminist Ethics: Women, Embodiment, Care Relations, and Systemic Injustice.Helga Varden - 2018 - In Pieranna Garavaso (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Academic Feminism. pp. 459-482.
    By setting the focus on issues of dependence and embodiment, feminist work has and continues to radically improve our understanding of Kant’s practical philosophy as one that is not (as it typically has been taken to be) about disembodied abstract rational agents. This paper outlines this positive development in Kant scholarship in recent decades by taking us from Kant’s own comments on women through major developments in Kant scholarship with regard to the related feminist issues. The main aim is to (...)
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  35. Timing Problems: When Care and Violence Converge in Stephen King's Horror Novel Christine.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):397-414.
    Judith Butler, Joan Tronto, and Stephen King all hinge human experience on shared ontological vulnerability, but whereas Butler and Tronto use vulnerability to build ethical commitments, King exploits aging, disability, and death to frighten us. King's horror genre is provocative for the imaginative landscape of feminist theory precisely because he uses vulnerability to magnify the anxieties of mass culture. In Christine, the characters' shared susceptibility to psychic and physical injury blurs the boundary between care and violence. Like Butler, King depicts (...)
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  36. Property in the Body: Feminist Perspectives, Second Edition.Donna Dickenson - 2017 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  37. Othered Body, Obscene Self(Ie): A Sartrean Reading of Kim Kardashian-West.Elese Dowden - 2017 - Hecate 43 (2):117-130.
    In this existential reading of Kim Kardashian-West's International Women's Day selfie of 2016, I focus on the rise of selfie culture and public discourse around emerging digital representations of women's bodies. The selfie is a relatively new phenomenon, and is particularly curious because of the subject/object paradox it creates; in taking a selfie, a person asserts control over their own image, but at the same time, becomes object in their own gaze. My argument is that selfies, like other assertions of (...)
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  38. Resisting Body Oppression: An Aesthetic Approach.Sherri Irvin - 2017 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 3 (4):1-26.
    Open Access: This article argues for an aesthetic approach to resisting oppression based on judgments of bodily unattractiveness. Philosophical theories have often suggested that appropriate aesthetic judgments should converge on sets of objects consensually found to be beautiful or ugly. The convergence of judgments about human bodies, however, is a significant source of injustice, because people judged to be unattractive pay substantial social and economic penalties in domains such as education, employment and criminal justice. The injustice is compounded by the (...)
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  39. Remembering and Loving in Relationships Involving Dying, Death, and Grief.Christine M. Koggel - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):193-198.
  40. Depression Memoirs in the Circuits of Culture: Sexism, Sanism, Neoliberalism, and Narrative Identity.Bradley Lewis - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):303-306.
    Ginger Hoffman and Jennifer Hansen’s study of gender dynamics in psychiatric disability memoirs makes several fruitful moves for the study of psychic diversity. Perhaps the most important is that the article encourages analytic philosophers to contribute to understanding how individual mental life is affected by the larger cultural context—which we can think of as the “mind/culture” problem. This is an important move because, for the most part, analytic philosophers have paid more attention to the mind/body problem than they have to (...)
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  41. Bodies in Politics.Lawrie Balfour, Falguni A. Sheth, Heath Fogg Davis, Shatema Threadcraft & Jemima Repo - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (1):80-118.
  42. Our Bodies, Whose Property?Laura Brace - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (2):e8-e10.
  43. Should Feminists Defend Self-Defense?Ann J. Cahill & Grayson Hunt - 2016 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):172-182.
    —Grayson Hunt1In 2015, I visited Lake Cumberland in Kentucky for a day of boating and swimming with friends. At one end of the lake was an amazing waterfall. As I was swimming near it, I looked up and saw a man thirty feet above in the bushes on top of the falls. He waved. I waved back. Only he wasn’t boating; he was just standing there. So I stared at him, wondering what he was doing up there. Then I realized (...)
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  44. Digestion, Habit, and Being at Home: Hegel and the Gut as Ambiguous Other.Jane Dryden - 2016 - PhaenEx 11 (2):1-22.
    Recent work in the philosophy of biology argues that we must rethink the biological individual beyond the boundary of the species, given that a key part of our essential functioning is carried out by the bacteria in our intestines in a way that challenges any strictly genetic account of what is involved for the biological human. The gut is a kind of ambiguous other within our understanding of ourselves, particularly when we also consider the status of gastro-intestinal disorders. Hegel offers (...)
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  45. Gender, Nation, and the Politics of Shame: Magdalen Laundries and the Institutionalization of Feminine Transgression in Modern Ireland.Clara Fischer - 2016 - Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 41 (4):821-843.
    In this article, I trace the politics of shame in the context of the problematization of women’s bodies as markers of sexual immorality in modern Ireland. I argue that the post-Independence project of national identity formation established women as bearers of virtue and purity and that sexual transgression threatening this new identity came to be severely punished. By hiding women, children, and all those deemed to be dangerous to national self-representations of purity, the Irish state, supported by Catholic moral values (...)
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  46. The Normative Importance of Pregnancy Challenges Surrogacy Contracts.Anca Gheaus - 2016 - Analize. Journal of Gender and Feminist Studies 6 (20):20-31.
    Birth mothers usually have a moral right to parent their newborns in virtue of a mutual attachment formed, during gestation, between the gestational mother and the fetus. The attachment is formed, in part, thanks to the burdens of pregnancy, and it serves the interest of the newborn; the gestational mother, too, has a powerful interest in the protection of this attachment. Given its justification, the right to parent one's gestated baby cannot be transferred at will to other people who would (...)
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  47. Remembering and Loving in Relationships Involving Dying, Death, and Grief.Christine M. Koggel - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4).
  48. The Dancing Woman Is the Woman Who Dances Into the Future: Rancière, Dance, Politics. Mills - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (4):482-499.
    The dancer is not a woman dancing, for these juxtaposed reasons; that is not a woman, but a metaphor summing up one of the elementary aspects of our form: knife, goblet, flower etc., and that she is not dancing, but suggesting through the miracle of bends and leaps, a kind of corporal writing, what it would take pages of prose, dialogue and description to express. In this article I examine the problematic position Jacques Rancière holds in his political philosophy with (...)
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  49. Doctor's Orders: Menopause, Weight Change, and Feminism.Kathryn J. Norlock - 2016 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):190-197.
    “I am still in despair over losing my identity,” said a blog comment in a discussion about post-menopause weight gain. Instead of recovering an identity, for some of us, as women age, our attitudes toward fitness may require forging new identities. But the challenge in coming to desire fitness, post-menopause, is a project of actually changing my desires. Habituating a good practice can lead to a change in our appetites, so that instead of losing our identities, we may become the (...)
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  50. Choose Your Battles: Agonism and Identity in Narratives of Feminist Fitnesses.Michelle Parrinello-Cason - 2016 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):141-171.
    Can feminist fitness exist? Before we can begin to answer that question, we must first examine what is at stake in asking it and why it’s a question in the first place. Ultimately, what we wonder when we question the coexistence of feminism and fitness is whether individuals can read themselves into narratives of feminism while simultaneously reading themselves into narratives of fitness. Of course, this task is made much more difficult by the fact that narratives of feminism and fitness (...)
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