Death and Dying

Edited by Craig Paterson (Complutense University of Madrid)
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  1. The Ethics of Uncertainty: Entangled Ethical and Epistemic Risks in Disorders of Consciousness.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Disorders of Consciousness (DoCs) raise difficult and complex questions about the value of life for persons with impaired consciousness, the rights of persons unable to make medical decisions, and our social, medical, and ethical obligations to patients whose personhood has frequently been challenged and neglected. Recent neuroscientific discoveries have led to enhanced understanding of the heterogeneity of these disorders, and focused renewed attention on the medical and ethical problem of misdiagnosis. -/- This book examines the entanglement of epistemic and ethical (...)
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  2. Medical Ersatz Liturgies of Death: Anatomical Dissection and Organ Donation as Biopolitical Practices.Kimbell Kornu - 2020 - Heythrop Journal.
    The academic medical center provides a dramatic space for liturgies through various enactments of death and dying. I argue that anatomical dissection and organ transplantation are ersatz liturgies of death that parody the Eucharist – ‘this is my body given for you’ – and perpetuate a biopolitics of the sovereign subject. To this end, I employ two differing yet complementary conceptions of liturgy: James Smith’s concept of cultural liturgies and Giorgio Agamben’s notion of Christian liturgy as the paradigm for modernity’s (...)
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  3. Animated Persona: The Ontological Status of a Deceased Person Who Continues to Appear in This World.Masahiro Morioka - 2021 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 6:115-131.
    In this paper, I propose the concept of the “animated persona,” a soundless voice that says, “I am here” and appears on the surface of someone or something. This concept can bring clarity to the experience of perceiving a kind of personhood on a corpse, a wooden mask, or even a tree. In the first half of this paper, I will examine some Japanese literature and a work of Viktor Frankl’s that discuss these phenomena. In the second half, I will (...)
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  4. Dying for a Cause: Meaning, Commitment, and Self-Sacrifice.Antti Kauppinen - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 90:57-80.
    Some people willingly risk or give up their lives for something they deeply believe in, for instance standing up to a dictator. A good example of this are members of the White Rose student resistance group, who rebelled against the Nazi regime and paid for it with their lives. I argue that when the cause is good, such risky activities (and even deaths themselves) can contribute to meaning in life in its different forms – meaning-as-mattering, meaning-as-purpose, and meaning-as-intelligibility. Such cases (...)
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  5. La zarigüeya de Schrödinger: Cómo viven y entienden la muerte los animales.Susana Monsó - 2021 - Madrid, Spain: Plaza y Valdés.
    Cuando la zarigüeya se siente amenazada, se paraliza, con los ojos y la boca abiertos en una mueca petrificada, la temperatura corporal y respiración reducidas al mínimo, la lengua desplegando un tono azulado y sus glándulas anales oliendo a podrido. Pese a este disfraz de cadáver putrefacto, sigue pendiente de su entorno, lista para volver a la acción. Como el gato en la famosa paradoja de Schrödinger, la zarigüeya está viva y muerta al mismo tiempo. -/- En este libro exploraremos (...)
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  6. Philosophy of Death.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    In paleontology, the discovery of funeral rites is an important factor in determining the degree of social awakening of a hominid. This awareness of death is an engine of social cohesion (uniting to resist disasters and enemies) and action (to do something to leave a trace). It is an important element of metaphysical reflection. This is also what gives the symbolic power to acts such as homicide and suicide. According to Plato, death is the separation of soul and body. Finally (...)
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  7. The Paradox of Fear in Classical Indian Buddhism.Bronwyn Finnigan - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (5):913-929.
    The Buddhist Nikāya Suttas frequently mention the concept of fear (bhaya) and related synonyms. This concept does not receive much scholarly attention by subsequent Buddhist philosophers. Recent scholars identify a ‘paradox of fear’ in several traditions of classical Indian Buddhism (Brekke 1999, Finnigan 2019, Giustarini 2012). Each scholar points out, in their respective textual contexts, that fear is evaluated in two ways; one positive and the other negative. Brekke calls this the “double role” of fear (1999: 443). Each also identify (...)
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  8. Opioids, Double Effect, and the Prospects of Hastening Death.Philip A. Reed - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (5):505-515.
    The relevance of double effect for end-of-life decision-making has been challenged recently by a number of scholars. The principal reason is that opioids such as morphine do not usually hasten death when administered to relieve pain at the end of life; therefore, no secondary “double” effect is brought about. In my article, I argue against this view, showing how the doctrine of double effect is relevant to the administration of opioids at the end of life. I contend that the prevailing (...)
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  9. Grieving Our Way Back to Meaningfulness.Michael Cholbi - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 90:235-251.
    The deaths of those on whom our practical identities rely generate a sense of disorientation or alienation from the world seemingly at odds with life being meaningful. In the terms put forth in Cheshire Calhoun’s recent account of meaningfulness in life, because their existence serves as a metaphysical presupposition of our practical identities, their deaths threaten to upend a background frame of agency against which much of our choice and deliberation takes place. Here I argue for a dual role for (...)
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  10. Of Blood Transfusions and Feeding Tubes: Anorexia-Nervosa and Consent.Samuel Director - forthcoming - Public Affairs Quarterly:1-26.
    Individuals suffering from anorexia-nervosa experience dysmorphic perceptions of their body and desire to act on these perceptions by refusing food. In some cases, anorexics want to refuse food to the point of death. In this paper, I answer this question: if an anorexic, A, wants to refuse food when the food would either be life-saving or prevent serious bodily harm, can A’s refusal be valid? I argue that there is compelling reason to think that anorexics can validly refuse food, even (...)
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  11. Making Death Not Quite as Bad for the One Who Dies.Kirsten Egerstrom - 2021 - In Michael Cholbi & Travis Timmermann (eds.), Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 93-100.
    One popular rival to Epicureanism is deprivationism, which maintains that a person’s death at a given time is bad for her to the extent that, and because, it prevents her from having a longer life that would have been, on the whole, good. Deprivationism has the surprising implication that we can lessen how bad a person’s death is for them by changing the life they would have had if they lived longer (for example, by convincing a person’s favorite author to (...)
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  12. Viral Queerings, Amplified Vulnerabilities.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - In Jussi Koitela & Yvonne Billimor (eds.), Rehearsing Hospitalities Companion 2. Berlin: pp. 155-172.
    From Editors' Introduction: "With our invitation to turn over (re-turn) hospitality in these times Marietta Radomska’s response combines her own research within the emerging field of Queer Death Studies6 with a detailed reading of the coronavirus disease pandemic. In her essay, “Viral queerings, amplified vulnerabilities”, Marietta seeks to subvert normative and simplified understandings of our present. Following the thread that the pandemic affects some bodies more than others, Marietta highlights how “the exploitation and degradation of nature mixed with intensifying socio-economic (...)
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  13. Abortion and the Veil of Ignorance: A Response to Minehan.Joona Räsänen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In a recent JME paper, Matthew John Minehan applies John Rawls’ veil of ignorance against Judith Thomson’s famous violinist argument for the permissibility of abortion. Minehan asks readers to ‘imagine that one morning you are back to back in bed with another person. One of you is conscious and the other unconscious. You do not know which one you are’. Since from this position of ignorance, you have an equal chance of being the unconscious violinist and the conscious person attached (...)
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  14. Life and Death Without the Present.Daniel Story - forthcoming - The Journal of Ethics:1-15.
    In this paper, I explore the connection between certain metaphysical views of time and emotional attitudes concerning one’s own death and mortality. I argue that one metaphysical view of time, B-theory, offers consolation to mortals in the face of death relative to commonsense and another metaphysical view of time, A-theory. Consolation comes from three places. First, B-theory implies that time does not really pass, and as a result one has less reason to worry about one’s time growing short. Second, B-theory (...)
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  15. Detached From Humanity: Artificial Gestation and the Christian Dilemma.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - forthcoming - Christian Bioethics.
    The development of artificial womb technology is proceeding rapidly and will present important ethical and theological challenges for Christians. While there has been extensive secular discourse on artificial wombs in recent years, there has been little Christian engagement with this topic. There are broadly two primary uses of artificial womb technology—ectogestation as a form of enhanced neonatal care, where some of the gestation period takes place in an artificial womb, and ectogenesis, where the entire gestation period is within an artificial (...)
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  16. Vices in Autonomous Paternalism: The Case of Advance Directives and Persons Living with Dementia.Sungwoo Um - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Advance directives are intended to extend patient autonomy by enabling patients to prospectively direct the care of their future incapacitated selves. There has been much discussion about issues such as whether the future incompetent self is identical to the agent who issues the advance directives or whether advance directives can legitimately secure patient autonomy. However, there is another important question to ask: to what extent and in what conditions is it ethically appropriate for one to limit the liberty or agency (...)
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  17. Withholding Information to Protect a Loved One.Todd J. Kilbaugh, Daniel Groll, Nabina Liebow, Wynne Morrison & John D. Lantos - 2016 - Pediatrics 6 (136).
    Parents respond to the death of a child in very different ways. Some parents may be violent or angry, some sad and tearful, some quiet and withdrawn, and some frankly delusional. We present a case in which a father’s reaction to his daughter’s death is a desire to protect his wife from the stressful information. The wife is in the second trimester of a high-risk pregnancy and so is particularly fragile. We asked pediatricians and bioethicists to discuss the ways in (...)
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  18. Conditioned for Death: Analysing Black Mortalities From Covid-19 and Police Killings in the United States as a Syndemic Interaction.Tommy J. Curry - 2021 - Comparative American Studies An International Journal 17 (3-4):257-270.
    The Covid-19 pandemic has been analysed as a distinct from, but concurrent with, more typical racist events, such as police killings in the United States. This article argues that one can conceptualise these two events as inter-related and synergistically enhanced. Anti-Black racism is a dynamic that utilises different social inequalities and violent events to manage the Black population within the United States. This article suggests that theorists would benefit from a syndemic analysis of disease and anti-Black violence in future theorisations (...)
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  19. If Fetuses Are Persons, Abortion is a Public Health Crisis.Bruce Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (5):465-472.
    Pro-life advocates commonly argue that fetuses have the moral status of persons, and an accompanying right to life, a view most pro-choice advocates deny. A difficulty for this pro-life position has been Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, in which she argues that even if the fetus is a person, abortion is often permissible because a pregnant woman is not obliged to continue to offer her body as life support. Here, we outline the moral theories underlying public health ethics, and examine (...)
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  20. Psychiatric Euthanasia and the Ontology of Mental Disorder.Hane Htut Maung - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (1):136-154.
    In the Netherlands and Belgium, it is lawful for voluntary euthanasia to be offered on the grounds of psychiatric suffering. A recent case that has sparked much debate is that of Aurelia Brouwers, who was helped to die in the Netherlands on account of her suffering from borderline personality disorder. It is sometimes claimed that whether or not a mentally ill person’s wish to die is valid hinges on whether or not that wish is a symptom of the person’s mental (...)
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  21. Hindu Response to Dying and Death in the Time of COVID-19.Purushottama Bilimoria - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    We wake each morning to news on the glaring statistics of people infected by COVID-19 and others reportedly dying from complications thereto; the numbers are not receding in at least a number of countries across the world. It is hard to imagine a moment such as this that most of us have lived through in our life-time; but it is a reality and public challenge that we can neither ignore nor look away from. In what follows I will explore perspectives (...)
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  22. Twin Pregnancy, Fetal Reduction and the 'All or Nothing Problem’.Joona Räsänen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106938.
    Fetal reduction is the practice of reducing the number of fetuses in a multiple pregnancy, such as quadruplets, to a twin or singleton pregnancy. Use of assisted reproductive technologies increases the likelihood of multiple pregnancies, and many fetal reductions are done after in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer, either because of social or health-related reasons. In this paper, I apply Joe Horton’s all or nothing problem to the ethics of fetal reduction in the case of a twin pregnancy. I argue (...)
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  23. Near-Death Experiences: To the Edge of the Universe.J. M. Fischer - 2020 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 27 (11-12):166-191.
    Most discussions of near-death experiences (NDEs) in both the academic and popular literature contend that they establish ('prove') supernaturalism (about NDEs): they show that the mind is not the brain (and can continue after the brain stops functioning), and they bring us into contact with non-physical realms. I believe that the evidence provided by NDEs for supernaturalism is not persuasive, but I offer an alternative, naturalistic interpretation of these phenomena. On this interpretation, NDEs are 'real' in both senses of the (...)
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  24. Equality, Mortality and Community in “At a Graveside”.Tomer Raudanski - 2020 - In Mélissa Fox-Muraton (ed.), Kierkegaard and Issues in Contemporary Ethics. De Gruyter. pp. 169-192.
    Kierkegaard’s notions of mood and earnestness are underlined by two understandings of equality. Mood conceives of our equality in mortality as the fate common to all human beings, where existence is comprehended in natural or biological thought categories. On such a view, man’s essence is to be regarded as a corporal substance that can be fully appropriated or posited; consequently, our common humanity is reduced to formal equality in annihilation that ignores individual distinctiveness and differences. Earnestness, by contrast, understands human (...)
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  25. Death, and the Human Preference for the Future.Britton Watson - manuscript
    I briefly discuss the philosophical reasons for preferring the future over the present.
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  26. Viața și moartea în pandemie.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    O scurtă retrospectivă a virusul COVID-19 care a cauzat actuala pandemie, a cilului său de viață și a istoriei sale. Reacții, măsuri și efecte ale pandemiei COVID-19. O prezentare a diverselor abordări filosofice, cu accent pe filosofia morții, ecopsihanaliză, și apel la filosofiile lui Sigmund Freud și Albert Camus. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.17900.59528.
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  27. ERISA Reform as Health Reform: The Case for an ERISA Preemption Waiver.Elizabeth Y. McCuskey - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):450-461.
    If federal health reforms continue to rely on employer-sponsored health care coverage, ERISA preemption reform should be part of the next steps. State-level reform has acquired greater urgency, while the justifications for preempting that source of reform has eroded. This article recommends a statutory waiver for ERISA preemption as a feasible way to adapt to these circumstances. It offers proposed statutory text for reformers inclined to pursue ERISA reform as health reform.
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  28. Reflections on the Ethics of End-Stage Kidney Disease Care in the U.S.Fredric O. Finkelstein & Alan S. Kliger - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):535-537.
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  29. The Unrealized Eschatology of Michel Henry: Theological Gestures From His Phenomenological Aesthetics.Christopher C. Rios - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (4):843-864.
  30. Der Unterschied zwischen Töten und Sterbenlassen und die Bedeutung von Handlungssphären.Ralf Stoecker - 2020 - In Jan Christoph Bublitz, Jochen Bung, Anette Grünewald, Dorothea Magnus, Holm Putzke & Jörg Scheinfeld (eds.), Recht - Philosophie - Literatur. Festschrift für Reinhard Merkel zum 70. Geburtstag. Berlin, Deutschland: Duncker & Humblot. pp. 649-666.
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  31. Anya Bernstein. The Future of Immortality: Remaking Life and Death in Contemporary Russia. Xv + 270 Pp., Bibl., Index. Princeton, N.J./Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2019. $75 (Paper). Hardcover and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Yvonne Howell - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):693-694.
  32. N. T. Wright, History and Eschatology.Andrew I. Shepardson - 2020 - Philosophia Christi 22 (1):180-184.
  33. The Meaning of Life and Death: Ten Classic Thinkers on the Ultimate Question, Michael Hauskeller, 2020. London, Bloomsbury Academic. Xv + 236 Pp. £ 45.50 (Hb) £ 13.99. [REVIEW]Lantz Fleming Miller - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):681-683.
    This book is at once incisive and exploratory, interpretive and historic scholarship. It appeals to both general and specialized readers. It uniquely takes a common philosophical theme, the meaning of life, and traces it through many philosophers’ and novelists' works. Sometimes the theme is buried and implicit, and offers a plausible distillation of each author's view. The result is a title that may sound like a self-help book’s—except the contents expand in manifold directions rather than narrow to easy advice. The (...)
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  34. Rebranding Death.Angela Wentz Faulconer - 2017 - BYU Journal of Public Law 31 (2):313-332.
    In this paper, I will argue that efforts to legalize aid-in-dying or physician-assisted suicide are attempts to rebrand this sort of death as a good choice. It is common to justify physician-assisted suicide through arguments for a) relieving suffering or b) allowing individual autonomy, but I will show that the problem with these justifications is that once this type of death is judged as acceptable, it is difficult to justify limiting it to a narrow group such as the mentally competent, (...)
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  35. The Value of Longevity.Greg Bognar - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (3):229-247.
    Longevity is valuable. Most of us would agree that it’s bad to die when you could go on living, and death’s badness has to do with the value your life would have if it continued. Most of us would also agree that it’s bad if life expectancy in a country is low, it’s bad if there is high infant mortality and it’s bad if there is a wide mortality gap between different groups in a population. But how can we make (...)
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  36. On the Verge of Subjectivity: Phenomenologies of Death.Christian Sternad - 2020 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Springer. pp. 231-243.
    This article analyzes various phenomenological approaches to death and articulates how these approaches affect their respective conceptions of subjectivity. Since death interrupts the correlation between the subject and the object, it puts into question the fundamental premises of the phenomenological method. If a phenomenon can only appear for a subject, then how can phenomenology deal with a phenomenon that ends subjectivity? By going through classical positions, I seek to demonstrate that one can only gain a full picture of human mortality (...)
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  37. Two Arguments for Animal Immortality.Blake Hereth - 2018 - In Simon Cushing (ed.), Heaven and Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 171-200.
    Some, like the Scholastics, held that nonhuman animals could not survive bodily death and would therefore be absent in any afterlife. Against them, I argue that all sentient animals lacking moral agency are immortal and that their immortality is good for them. Call this thesis Animal Immortalism. This paper offers two arguments for Animal Immortalism: the Faultless Harm Argument and the Just Compensation Argument. According to the former, because death and eternal misery are harms to sentient animals to which they (...)
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  38. Saving the Babies or the Elderly in a Time of Crisis?Joona Räsänen - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):180-182.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 180-182.
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  39. Coronavirus and Value Pluralism : A Robust Ethical Perspective on a Pandemic.Ignace Haaz - 2020 - Journal of Dharma 45 (2):261-280.
    The fear of the largely unknown consequences of being exposed to coronavirus should have brought a more dynamic interplay of beliefs and opinions for those who in the footsteps of J.S. Mill believe that the limits of power, which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual, is to prevent harm to others. It is surprising that not much debate or critical interaction has taken place on the choice of locking down most of the populace in 185 countries after (...)
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  40. Ireneusz Ziemiński, Tod, Unsterblichkeit, Sinn des Lebens. Existentielle Dimension der Philosophie von Ludwig Wittgenstein [Śmierć, niesmiertelność, sens życia. Egzystencjalny wymiarfilozofii Ludwiga Wittgensteina] by Józef Bremer.Józef Bremer - 2008 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 13 (1):154-157.
  41. Tot, unsterblich.Sarah Kofman - 1991 - Die Philosophin 2 (3):111-112.
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  42. Navigating the Regulatory Framework for HIV Prevention Research in Adolescents.Quianta Moore & Zeinab Bakhiet - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):202-204.
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  43. Dead People and the All‐Affected Principle.Andreas Bengtson - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (1):89-102.
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  44. Conversation From Beyond the Grave? A Neo‐Confucian Ethics of Chatbots of the Dead.Alexis Elder - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (1):73-88.
  45. Urbis Et Orbis: Non-Euclidean Space of History.Alex V. Halapsis - 2015 - The European Philosophical and Historical Discourse 1 (2):37-42.
    Social space is superimposed on the civilization map of the world whereas the social time is correlated with the duration of civilization existence. Within own civilization the concept space is non-homogeneous, there are “singled out points” — “concept factories”. As social structures, cities may exist rather long, sometimes during several millennia, but as concept centres they are limited by the duration of civilization existence. If civilization is a “concept universe”, nobody and nothing may cross the boundaries, which include cities as (...)
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  46. Societal-Level Ethical Responsibilities Regarding Active Euthanasia: An Analysis Using the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists.Carole Sinclair - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (1):14-27.
    Using the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists as an ethical framework, some of the major successes, challenges and needs that psychology has regarding its responsibilities to society in the area of end-of-life decision making and active euthanasia are outlined in this paper. Four particular responsibilities are highlighted: increase professional and scientific knowledge; use psychological knowledge for beneficial purposes; adequately train its members: and encourage beneficial social structures and policies. For each responsibility, some of the major societal-level ethical issues (...)
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  47. Ethical Issues When Working with Terminally Ill People Who Desire to Hasten the Ends of Their Lives: A Western Perspective.Alfred Allan & Maria M. Allan - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (1):28-44.
    Terminally ill people might want to discuss the options they have of hastening their deaths with their psychologists who should therefore know the law that regulates euthanasia in the jurisdictions where they practice. The legal, and therefore ethical, situation that influences psychologists’ position and terminally ill people’s options, however, differs notably across jurisdictions. Our aim is to provide a brief moral-legal historical context that explains how the law reform processes in different jurisdictions created these different legal contexts and options that, (...)
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  48. The Guide to Gethsemane: Anxiety, Suffering, Death by EmmanuelFalque, Translated by George Hughes , Xxx + 159 Pp. [REVIEW]Barnabas Aspray - 2020 - Modern Theology 36 (1):230-232.
  49. From Dusk Till Dawn: Bioethical Insights Into the Beginning and the End of Life.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: Logos Verlag.
    From Dawn till Dusk embraces the conceptual challenges often associated with Bioethics by taking the reader on a journey that embodies the circle of life and what it means to be human. The beginning and the end of life have always been an impossible riddle to humans. Bioethics does not aspire to unveil utter truths regarding the purpose of our existence; on the contrary, its task is to settle controversial issues that arise within this finite, very fragile and vulnerable life, (...)
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  50. Demystifying the Negative René Girard’s Critique of the “Humanization of Nothingness”.Andreas Wilmes - 2019 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 24 (1):91-126.
    This paper will address René Girard’s critique of the “humanization of nothingness” in modern Western philosophy. I will first explain how the “desire for death” is related to a phenomenon that Girard refers to as “obstacle addiction.” Second, I will point out how mankind’s desire for death and illusory will to self-divinization gradually tend to converge within the history of modern Western humanism. In particular, I will show how this convergence between self-destruction and self-divinization gradually takes shape through the evolution (...)
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