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  1. Ableism and Ageism: Insights From Disability Studies for Aging Studies.Joel Michael Reynolds & Anna Landre - manuscript
    [This piece is written for those working in social gerontology and aging studies, with the aim of bringing insights from disability studies and philosophy of disability to bear on enduring debates in those fields.] The guiding question of humanistic age-studies—What does it mean to grow old?—cannot be answered without reflecting on disability. This is not simply because growing old invariably means becoming impaired in various ways, but also because the discriminations and stigmas involved in ageism are often rooted in ableism. (...)
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  2. Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability in Advance.Andria Bianchi - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  3. Jo Campling Essay Prize, Postgraduate Winner, 2019Whose Knowledge Counts? Rewriting the Literature Review to Include Marginalised Voices.Francesca Ribenfors - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-8.
  4. Knowing Disability, Differently.Shelley Tremain - forthcoming - In Ian James Kidd, Jose Medina & Pohlhaus Jr (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice. Routledge.
  5. Theory of Disability.Susan Wendell - forthcoming - Bioethics: Basic Writings on the Key Ethical Questions That Surround the Major, Modern Biological Possibilities and Problems.
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  6. Food Choices and Gut Issues.Jane Dryden - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    People with gut issues are often constrained in the foods they are able to eat. The choices they are able to make about food, however, are shaped not merely by specific medical and dietary needs but also by social, relational, and environmental factors such as the presence of trusted and supportive others who take their needs seriously. Drawing on work in disability theory and relational autonomy, as well as interviews undertaken in summer 2019, the paper explores the ways that choices (...)
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  7. Disability, Impairment, and Marginalised Functioning.Katharine Jenkins & Aness Kim Webster - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99 (4):730-747.
    One challenge in providing an adequate definition of physical disability is unifying the heterogeneous bodily conditions that count as disabilities. We examine recent proposals by Elizabeth Barnes (2016), and Dana Howard and Sean Aas (2018), and show how this debate has reached an impasse. Barnes’ account struggles to deliver principled unification of the category of disability, whilst Howard and Aas’ account risks inappropriately sidelining the body. We argue that this impasse can be broken using a novel concept: marginalised functioning. Marginalised (...)
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  8. Oppressive Things.Shen-yi Liao & Bryce Huebner - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):92-113.
    In analyzing oppressive systems like racism, social theorists have articulated accounts of the dynamic interaction and mutual dependence between psychological components, such as individuals’ patterns of thought and action, and social components, such as formal institutions and informal interactions. We argue for the further inclusion of physical components, such as material artifacts and spatial environments. Drawing on socially situated and ecologically embedded approaches in the cognitive sciences, we argue that physical components of racism are not only shaped by, but also (...)
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  9. Cracks Filled with Images: Mental Disability, Trauma, and Crip Rhetoric in Cereus Blooms at Night.Jennifer Marchisotto - 2021 - In Jina B. Kim, Joshua Kupetz, Crystal Yin Lie & Cynthia Wu (eds.), Sex, Identity, Aesthetics: The Work of Tobin Siebers and Disability Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. pp. 58-76.
  10. The Message in the Microaggression: Epistemic Oppression at the Intersection of Disability and Race.Zara Bain & Jeanine Weekes Schroer - 2020 - In Jeanine Weekes Schroer & Lauren Freeman (eds.), Microaggressions and Philosophy. New York:
    This chapter articulates how people understand “microaggression” and offers a clarifying augmentation of that account. It attempts to define disability, and then talk through how analysis connects with the very few discussions of microaggressions within the context of disability. The chapter introduces the case of “Disabled But Not Really.” It leverages previous analysis to show how microaggressions’ mixed legibility is crucial to their role in maintaining an epistemology that polices disability in general and disabled people in particular. The chapter discusses (...)
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  11. Community Care: The Ethics of Care in a Residential Community.Marian Barnes - 2020 - Ethics and Social Welfare 14 (2):140-155.
  12. Depression’s Threat to Self-Governance.August Gorman - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (2):277-297.
    Much of the literature on impairment to self-governance focuses on cases in which a person either lacks the ability to protect herself from errant urges or cases in which a person lacks the capacity to initiate self-reflective agential processes. This has led to frameworks for thinking about self-governance designed with only the possibility of these sorts of impairments in mind. I challenge this orthodoxy using the case of melancholic depression to show that there is a third way that self-governance can (...)
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  13. Field Notes on the Naturalization and Denaturalization of Disability in (Feminist) Philosophy: What They Do and How They Do It.Shelley Lynn Tremain - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (3).
    Abstract In this article, I offer an account of how the individualized and medicalized conception of disability that prevailsin philosophy is naturalized in bioethics, cognitive science, feminist philosophy, political philosophy, and other subfields of the discipline. By the end of the article, I will have both indicated how disabled people are constituted in philosophical discourse as a problem to be rectified or eliminated and explained how the prevalence in philosophy of this naturalized conceptionof disability contributes to and reinforces the exclusion (...)
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  14. Untitled Review: E.F.Kittay, Learning from My Daugther. [REVIEW]Christoph P. Trueper - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 74:313-316.
  15. Looking Back to Look Forward: Disability, Philosophers, and Activism.Robert A. Wilson - 2020 - Diversity and Inclusion Section, APA Blog.
    How have and how might philosophers contribute to linking disability and activism in these peri-COVID-19 times, especially in forms of public engagement that go beyond podcasted talks and articles aimed at a public audience? How do we harness philosophical thinking to contribute positively to those living with disability whose vulnerabilities are heightened by this pandemic and the ableism highlighted by collective responses to it?
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  16. An Intersectional Feminist Theory of Moral Responsibility.Michelle Ciurria - 2019 - Routledge.
    This book develops an intersectional feminist approach to moral responsibility. It accomplisheses four main goals. First, it outlines a concise list of the main principles of intersectional feminism. Second, it uses these principles to critique prevailing philosophical theories of moral responsibility. Third, it offers an account of moral responsibility that is compatible with the ethos of intersectional feminism. And fourth, it uses intersectional feminist principles to critique culturally normative responsibility practices. -/- This is the first book to provide an explicitly (...)
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  17. “‘The Atlas of Our Skin and Bone and Blood’: Disability, Ablenationalism, and the War on Drugs".Andrea Pitts - 2019 - Genealogy 4 (3):1-16.
  18. Resisting Hegemony Through Noise.Casey Robertson - 2019 - Assuming Gender 8 (7.1):50-73.
    This essay examines the cultural phenomena of noise in its perceived social constructions and demonstrates its emergence as a form of resistance against prevailing dominant hegemonic codes of culture. In particular, the paper explores the ability of noise to be enacted as a tool to escape the shackles of heteronormative constructions of sexuality and gender in the cultural landscape of the United States. Examined to support this argument are the contrasting works of two American artists: John Cage and Emilie Autumn. (...)
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  19. Feminist Philosophy of Disability: A Genealogical Intervention.Shelley L. Tremain - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):132-158.
    This article is a feminist intervention into the ways that disability is researched and represented in philosophy at present. Nevertheless, some of the claims that I make over the course of the article are also pertinent to the marginalization in philosophy of other areas of inquiry, including philosophy of race, feminist philosophy more broadly, indigenous philosophies, and LGBTQI philosophy. Although the discipline of philosophy largely continues to operate under the guise of neutrality, rationality, and objectivity, the institutionalized structure of the (...)
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  20. Towards Including End-Users in the Design of Prosthetic Hands: Ethical Analysis of Survey of Australians with Upper-Limb Difference.Mary Jean Walker, Eliza Goddard, Benjamin Stephens-Fripp & Gursel Alici - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics (2):1-27.
    Advances in prosthetic design should benefit people with limb difference. But empirical evidence demonstrates a lack of uptake of prosthetics among those with limb difference, including of advanced designs. Non-use is often framed as a problem of prosthetic design or a user’s response to prosthetics. Few studies investigate user experience and preferences, and those that do tend to address satisfaction or dissatisfaction with functional aspects of particular designs. This results in limited data to improve designs and, we argue, this is (...)
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  21. Revisiting Feminist Matters in the Post-Linguistic Turn: John Dewey, New Materialisms, and Contemporary Feminist Thought.Clara Fischer - 2018 - In Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.), New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment. London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 83-102.
    In this chapter, I sketch some recent developments in feminist thought and present these alongside John Dewey’s work to assess what place pragmatism might assume in debates on contemporary, post-linguistic turn feminism. My task for this chapter is threefold: I redress the elision of pragmatism in the conversation around affect theory, new materialisms, and contemporary feminist theorising; I trace some of the confluences between Dewey’s work on nature and materiality, and the new materialist work of Stacy Alaimo and Karen Barad; (...)
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  22. Sharing Care Responsibilities Between Professionals and Personal Networks in Mental Healthcare: A Plea for Inclusion.Elleke Landeweer - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (2):147-159.
    This positional paper explores the role of personal networks (family and friends) in caring for people with mental health problems. Since the eighties, major changes have been made in the organization and focus of professional mental healthcare. Correspondingly, new expectations and changes in the division of care responsibilities between people with mental health problems, their personal networks and their professional care providers were created. In this paper, I investigate how the transition in mental healthcare changed the allocation of care responsibilities (...)
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  23. Interdependency: The Fourth Existential Insult to Humanity.Tom Malleson - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):160-186.
    Sigmund Freud famously described three existential insults to humanity stemming from heliocentrism, evolution, and psychoanalysis. In recent years we are, perhaps, beginning to see the emergence of a fourth: interdependency. Over the last several centuries, Anglo-American culture has modelled itself on a vision of the independent individual – strong, autonomous, and self-sufficient. Yet from feminist theory, communitarianism, disability theory, institutionalist economics, and elsewhere, the evidence mounts that independence is, in most contexts, a myth. We are, in fact, fundamentally social beings: (...)
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  24. Dangerous Discourses of Disability, Subjectivity and Sexuality by Margrit Shildrick. [REVIEW]Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (1):162-167.
    [Excerpt]: In the nonideal world against which philosophical ideas and ideals are tried, suffering is distributed unequally. A central, if not defining, question for many late-twentieth-century feminist ethicists is how and why so many forms of suffering are distributed by virtue of bodily difference. For over four decades, disability studies, a multidisciplinary field spanning the humanities and social sciences, has principally revolved around a basic question: is the concept of "disability" constructed like "race," "gender," or "sexuality"? In other words, is (...)
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  25. Should Pregnancy Be Considered a Disability?Devora Shapiro - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (1):91-105.
    Individuals with disabilities face significant challenges, both physically and socially. To claim a disability, therefore, is not something one ought to do lightly. Pregnancy, however, presents a very difficult and interesting case. Pain, discomfort, and inconvenience are often daily aspects of pregnancy, and pregnancy itself can cause physical, as well as social, impediments that can substantially interfere with one's day-to-day work and life. In practice, based on our current laws concerning family leave, ailments brought on by pregnancy can be cited (...)
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  26. Disabled Bodies and Norms of Flourishing in the Human Engineering Debate.Tom Sparrow - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):36-62.
    The debate over human genetic engineering and enhancement has evolved to the point where dismissive critics have yielded some ground to proponents of engineering programs and their vision of our posthuman future. This is not to say that either human engineering programs or posthumanism has become mainstream but that we have reached a point in history where it is not genetic engineering that conjures dystopian futures in our moral imaginations but the absence of human genetic enhancement. As Ingmar Persson and (...)
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  27. The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability, by Elizabeth Barnes: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, Pp. Xxii + 200, £25. [REVIEW]Shelley Tremain - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):203-203.
  28. Philosophy and the Apparatus of Disability.Shelley Tremain - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Abstract and Keywords Mainstream philosophers take for granted that disability is a prediscursive, transcultural, and transhistorical disadvantage, an objective human defect or characteristic that ought to be prevented, corrected, eliminated, or cured. That these assumptions are contestable, that it might be the case that disability is a historically and culturally specific, contingent social phenomenon, a complex apparatus of power, rather than a natural attribute or property that certain people possess, is not considered, let alone seriously entertained. This chapter draws on (...)
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  29. Timing Problems: When Care and Violence Converge in Stephen King's Horror Novel Christine.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):397-414.
    Judith Butler, Joan Tronto, and Stephen King all hinge human experience on shared ontological vulnerability, but whereas Butler and Tronto use vulnerability to build ethical commitments, King exploits aging, disability, and death to frighten us. King's horror genre is provocative for the imaginative landscape of feminist theory precisely because he uses vulnerability to magnify the anxieties of mass culture. In Christine, the characters' shared susceptibility to psychic and physical injury blurs the boundary between care and violence. Like Butler, King depicts (...)
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  30. Are We Prosaic Deep Inside?: Depression Memoirs, Resourceful Narratives, and the Biomedical Model of Depression.Anne E. Johnson - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):299-301.
    In “Prozac or Prosaic Diaries?”, Ginger Hoffman and Jennifer Hansen examine gendered messages in popular depression memoirs, using narrative self-constitution theory to emphasize the damaging effects such messages can have on women readers. In doing so, they bring a welcome feminist perspective to matters of mental health, as well as raising thought-provoking questions about depression memoirs, a genre that can have a far-reaching impact on public opinions about mental illness. Overall, Hoffman and Hansen do an excellent job of explaining the (...)
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  31. Em“Body”Ment and Disability: On Taking the “Body” Out of Em“Body”Ment.Julie E. Maybee - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):297-320.
  32. Depression Memoirs in the Circuits of Culture: Sexism, Sanism, Neoliberalism, and Narrative Identity.Bradley Lewis - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):303-306.
    Ginger Hoffman and Jennifer Hansen’s study of gender dynamics in psychiatric disability memoirs makes several fruitful moves for the study of psychic diversity. Perhaps the most important is that the article encourages analytic philosophers to contribute to understanding how individual mental life is affected by the larger cultural context—which we can think of as the “mind/culture” problem. This is an important move because, for the most part, analytic philosophers have paid more attention to the mind/body problem than they have to (...)
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  33. Book Review of The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability by Elizabeth Barnes. [REVIEW]Sara Protasi - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):892-894.
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  34. Being Better Bodies. [REVIEW]Joel Michael Reynolds - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (6):46-47.
    [Excerpt]: Bioethics has an uneasy relationship with embodiment. Only with vigilance does knowledge of the body as it is lived counterbalance the momentous inertia of knowledge of the body as an object brought about by modern medical sciences. As a field tethered to detached, technical ways of knowing the world, bioethics must toil to treat the body as more than mere material and machine. To be more is, among other things, to be social—to live in the thickets of interdependence and (...)
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  35. Feminism and Disability.Joel Michael Reynolds & Anita Silvers - 2017 - In Carol Hay (ed.), Philosophy: Feminism. Macmillan Reference USA. pp. 295-316.
    The article introduces readers to the study of disability, both with respect to the interdisciplinary field of disability studies and the field of philosophy of disability. We then offer an overview of three central areas of philosophical inquiry where feminist work in philosophy and disability has made significant contributions: (1) metaphysics and ontology, (2) epistemology and phenomenology, and (3) ethical, social, and political philosophy.
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  36. Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability (Winner of the Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities for 2016).Shelley Tremain - 2017 - Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press.
  37. Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability.Andria Bianchi - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:107-121.
    Respect for autonomy grounds common ethical judgments about why people should be allowed to make decisions for themselves. Under this assumption, it is concerning that a number of feminist conceptions of autonomy present challenges for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores some of the most philosophically influential feminist accounts of autonomy and demonstrates how these accounts exclude persons with intellectual disabilities. As a possible solution to these accounts, Laura Davy’s inclusive design approach is presented, which is a revised conception (...)
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  38. Feminist Approaches to Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):541-553.
    This essay explores various philosophical approaches to cognitive disability within feminist philosophy. In doing so, it addresses three broad questions: What positive contributions can feminist philosophy make to the philosophy of cognitive disability? How have feminist philosophers critiqued the presence and absence of cognitive disability in philosophy? And what challenges does cognitive disability pose to feminist philosophy itself? The essay begins with definitions and models of disability and then turns to feminist work on cognitive disability in moral and political philosophy, (...)
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  39. Justifying an Adequate Response to the Vulnerable Other.Kavanagh Chandra - 2016 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 7 (7):57-70.
    Is it possible to justify requiring that I respond adequately to the other’s vulnerability? I contend that insofar as I value my own personal identity it is consistent to respond adequately to the vulnerability of the other. Part one provides a break down of vulnerability in terms of its fundamental indeterminacy. Part two illustrates how the ability to respond either adequately or inadequately to the other’s vulnerability is implied by the fundamental co-constitution of personal identity. I understand myself as a (...)
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  40. "A Little of Her Language": Epistemic Injustice and Mental Disability.Josh Dohmen - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (4):669-691.
    In this essay, I argue that certain injustices faced by mentally disabled persons are epistemic injustices by drawing upon epistemic injustice literature, especially as it is developed by Miranda Fricker. First, I explain the terminology and arguments developed by Fricker, Gaile Pohlhaus, Jr., and Kristie Dotson that are useful in theorizing epistemic injustices against mentally disabled people. Second, I consider some specific cases of epistemic injustice to which mentally disabled persons are subject. Third, I turn to a discussion of severely (...)
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  41. Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror.Melinda Hall - 2016 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 36 (1).
    Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, which typically (...)
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  42. The Pain of Endo Existence: Toward a Feminist Disability Studies Reading of Endometriosis.Cara E. Jones - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):554-571.
    Disability scholars have critiqued medical models that pathologize disability as an individual flaw that needs treatment, rehabilitation, and cure, favoring instead a social-constructionist approach that likens disability to other identity categories such as gender, race, class, and sexuality. However, the emphasis on social constructionism has left chronic illness and pain largely untheorized. This article argues that feminist disability studies must attend to the common, chronic gynecological condition endometriosis when theorizing pain. Endo is particularly important for FDS analysis because the highly (...)
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  43. Remembering and Loving in Relationships Involving Dying, Death, and Grief.Christine M. Koggel - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4).
  44. Toward a Critical Theory of Harm: Ableism, Normativity, and Transability (BIID).Joel Michael Reynolds - 2016 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 16 (1):37-45.
    Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a very rare condition describing those with an intense desire or need to move from a state of ability to relative impairment, typically through the amputation of one or more limbs. In this paper, I draw upon research in critical disability studies and philosophy of disability to critique arguments based upon the principle of nonmaleficence against such surgery. I demonstrate how the action-relative concept of harm in such arguments relies upon suspect notions of biological (...)
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  45. Vital Wheels: Disability, Relationality, and the Queer Animacy of Vibrant Things.Julia Watts Belser - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (1):5-21.
    This article probes the philosophical and political significance of the relationships between wheelchair activists and their wheelchairs. Analyzing disability memoirs and the work of a professional wheelchair dancer, I argue that wheelers frequently experience complex relationality and queer kinships with their wheels. By bringing the artistry of disabled writers and dancers into conversation with the notions of human–material relations in the work of Donna Haraway, Jane Bennett, Stacy Alaimo, and Mel Chen, I show how alternative animacies shape wheelers’ conceptions of (...)
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  46. My Two Moms: Disability, Queer Kinship, and the Maternal Subject.Harold Braswell - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):234-250.
    Dominant Western discourses of motherhood have depicted disabled women as incapable of being mothers. In contrast to these representations, recent literature in disability studies has argued that disabled women can provide maternal care and should therefore retain custody over their children. This literature is commendable, but its emphasis on custodial rights excludes from the category of “mother” those disabled women who cannot maintain child custody. In this article, I challenge this exclusion via an account of my experience with my two (...)
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  47. Care, Disability, and Violence: Theorizing Complex Dependency in Eva Kittay and Judith Butler.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):217-233.
    How do we theorize the experiences of caregivers abused by their children with autism without intensifying stigma toward disability? Eva Kittay emphasizes examples of extreme vulnerability to overturn myths of independence, but she ignores the possibility that dependents with disabilities may be vulnerable and aggressive. Instead, her work over-emphasizes caregivers' capabilities and the constancy of disabled dependents' vulnerability. I turn to Judith Butler's ethics and her conception of the self as opaque to rethink care amid conflict. Person-centered planning approaches, pioneered (...)
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  48. New Conversations in Feminist Disability Studies: Feminism, Philosophy, and Borders.Kim Q. Hall - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):1-12.
  49. Continental Approaches in Bioethics.Melinda C. Hall - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (3):161-172.
    Bioethics influences public policy, scientific research, and clinical practice. Thinkers in Continental traditions have increasingly contributed scholarship to this field, and their approaches allow new insights and alternative normative guidance. In this essay, examples of the following Continental approaches in bioethics are presented and considered: phenomenology and existentialism; deconstruction; Foucauldian methodologies; and biopolitical analyses. Also highlighted are Continental feminisms and the philosophy of disability. Continental approaches are importantly diverse, but those I focus upon here reveal embedded models of individualized autonomy (...)
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  50. Bad Romance: A Crip Feminist Critique of Queer Failure.Merri Lisa Johnson - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):251-267.
    This article critiques Jack Halberstam's concept of queer failure through a feminist cripistemological lens. Challenging Halberstam's interpretation of Erika Kohut in The Piano Teacher as a symbol of postcolonial angst rather than a figure of psychosocial disability, the article establishes a critical coalition between crip feminist theory and queer-of-color theory to promote a materialist politics and literal-minded reading practice designed to recognize minority subjectivities rather than exploiting them for their metaphorical resonance. In asserting that Erika Kohut is better understood as (...)
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