About this topic
Summary

Philosophers working on the emotions are interested in answering the following kinds of questions:

What are emotions? Are they thoughts, feelings, perceptual or quasi-perceptual states, or something else? Or perhaps they are combination of all these things? Do emotions form a natural class? Are emotions natural kinds? Are emotions in some sense ‘socially constructed’?

What emotions are there? Is love an emotion? How about Schadenfreude? Are moods emotions? What about so-called moral or aesthetic or religious emotions? Are these emotions proper? Again, how are different emotions to be characterized? What distinguishes them from one another?

What is the relationship between emotion and reason? Can emotions be evaluated for their rationality? Or are emotions non-rational mental states? Do we need emotions in order to be ‘rational’?

Closely related to the last few questions, what is the nature of the relationship between emotion and morality? Are emotions needed to have insight into the evaluate realm? Can a person who lacks certain emotional capacities be a moral agent? How might emotion be important for understanding character, vice and virtue? How might emotion be a hindrance to morality?

Each of the emotion subcategories contains details of work on the emotions that is devoted to answering and shedding light on the above sorts of questions, along with many others.

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  1. Profession of Revulsion: Subjective Science and the Mobilization of Emotions in Late Nineteenth-Century Russian Public Medicine.Maria Pirogovskaya - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):105-125.
    This essay explores the rhetoric used by Russian zemstvo physicians, scholars of medicine, and sanitary inspectors to share their expertise with regard to health problems in the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Borrowing the conceptual framework of emotional practices introduced by Monique Scheer, it interprets an appeal to revulsion and sensorial evidence, employed as “templates of language and gesture,” that medical practitioners produced both to mobilize the emotions of their audience and to support their own professional stature. The (...)
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  2. Linking Work Events with Work Engagement: Mediating Role of Emotions and Moderating Role of Psychological Capital.Aleksandra Penza & Agata Gasiorowska - forthcoming - Polish Psychological Bulletin:289-308.
    We examined the role of work-related emotions and personal resources operationalised as psychological capital (PsyCap) in the relationship between events occurring at work and employees’ work engagement. Using affective events theory and broaden-and-build theory as theoretical frameworks, we theorise that the perceived frequency of positive and negative events at work and work engagement is mediated by positive and negative work-related emotions and moderated by PsyCap. The results of path analysis on a sample of US and Polish employees showed that PsyCap (...)
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  3. What could come before time? Intertwining affectivity and temporality at the basis of intentionality.Juan Diego Bogotá - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2024:1-21.
    The enactive approach to cognition and the phenomenological tradition have in common a wide conception of ‘intentionality’. Within these frameworks, intentionality is understood as a general openness to the world. For classical phenomenologists, the most basic subjective structure that allows for such openness is time-consciousness. Some enactivists, while inspired by the phenomenological tradition, have nevertheless argued that affectivity is more basic, being that which gives rise to the temporal flow of consciousness. In this paper, I assess the relationship between temporality (...)
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  4. The Spiritual Coping Model of Patients with Chronic Back Pain According to Mood/Anxiety Symptoms Mediating by Emotional Schemas.Ali Akbar Ebrahimbai Salami, Fatemeh Shahabizadeh, Qasim Ahi & Jalil Jarhiri Fariz - 2022 - Health, Spirituality and Medical Ethics 9 (4):241-248.
    Background and Objectives: Spiritual coping strategies of patients are influenced by their mood/anxiety symptoms and emotional schemas. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a conceptual model of spiritual coping in patients with chronic back pain, considering the role of mood/anxiety symptoms and emotional schemas. Methods: The research method was descriptive correlational. The statistical population included all women and men 25 to 55 years old with chronic back pain referring to the orthopedic and neurology clinics of Torbat Heydarieh City, Iran, (...)
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  5. An Artificial Neural Network to Predict Depression Symptoms Through Emotional Divorce and Spiritual Beliefs in Married University Students.Soheila Zakizadeh, Alireza Heidari, Behnam Makvandi & Parviz Asgari - 2023 - Health, Spirituality and Medical Ethics 10 (1):19-26.
    Background and Objectives: Spirituality and spiritual beliefs are among the factors playing key roles in preventing psychological disorders. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between depression symptoms with emotional divorce and spiritual beliefs using artificial neural networks (ANN) in married university students. Methods: The statistical population of this descriptive-correlational study included all married students at the Islamic Azad University of Ahvaz (Khuzestan Province, Iran) during the 2021–22 academic year. The convenience sampling technique was adopted to select 301 married (...)
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  6. Introduction: Emotions Towards Future Generations.Tiziana Andina & Giulio Sacco - 2024 - Topoi 43 (1):1-3.
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  7. The Paradox of the Future: Is it Rational to Feel Emotions for Future Generations?Carola Barbero - 2024 - Topoi 43 (1):75-84.
    According to some, there is a problem concerning the emotions we feel toward fictional entities such as Anna Karenina, Werther and the like. We feel pity, fear, and sadness toward them, but how is that possible? “We are saddened, but how can we be? What are we sad about? How can we feel genuinely and involuntarily sad, and weep, as we do know that no one has suffered or died?” (Radford, in: Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 1975). This is the (...)
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  8. Feeling Emotions for Future People.Tiziana Andina & Giulio Sacco - 2024 - Topoi 43 (1):5-15.
    It is more difficult to feel emotions for future generations than for those who currently exist, and this seems to be one of the reasons why we struggle to care for the future. According to a number of authors, who have recently focused on the psychological flaws that prevent us from dealing with transgenerational issues, the main problem is “future discounting”. Challenging this common view, we argue that the main reason we struggle to care about future generations lies in two (...)
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  9. Taking Maimonides personally - emotional reading of the Guide.Alexander Khait - manuscript
    While most literature on Maimonides’ Guide for the Perplexed is written by professional scholars, most readers of the treatise are “laymen”. The perspective of a reader from the latter category is typically different from that of the former. This division was expected by the author: the Guide addresses multiple categories of readers. Traditionally the Guide is considered either as a philosophical text or as exegesis of difficult places in Scripture. My claim is that between long passages devoted to philosophy and (...)
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  10. Hope: A Solution to the Puzzle of Difficult Action.Catherine Rioux - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Pursuing difficult long-term goals typically involves encountering substantial evidence of possible future failure. If decisions to pursue such goals are serious only if one believes that one will act as one has decided, then some of our lives’ most important decisions seem to require belief against the evidence. This is the puzzle of difficult action, to which I offer a solution. I argue that serious decisions to φ do not have to give rise to a belief that one will φ, (...)
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  11. Mme de Staël's Philosophy of Imagination.Arthur Krieger - 2023 - Cahiers Staëliens 73:77-100.
    In "De l’Allemagne", Mme de Staël develops a sophisticated philosophical psychology that centers not on reason, but imagination. She does this by bringing French Enlightenment philosophy, particularly Rousseau and Diderot, into dialogue with German thinkers, including Kant and Herder. For Mme de Staël, imagination transcends the epistemic limits of sensibility and reason by incorporating sentiment.
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  12. The Philosophy of Emotion in Buddhist Philosophy (and a Close Look at Remorse and Regret).Maria Heim - 2019 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 5 (1):2-25.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Philosophy of Emotion in Buddhist Philosophy (and a Close Look at Remorse and Regret)Maria HeimIt is an honor to guest-edit a special issue for the Journal of Buddhist Philosophy for its inaugural issue, and even more to be invited to write a somewhat longer article than is typically the privilege of the guest editor. It was thought that something of a broader statement of the state of the (...)
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  13. The Covid-19 Vaccine on TikTok: A Study of Emotional Expression in The Brazilian Contexto.Geilson Fernandes-de-Oliveira, Luisa Massarani, Thaiane Oliveira, Graziele Scalfi & Marcelo Alves-dos-Santos-Junior - forthcoming - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture:28-45.
    In this article, our objective was to analyze the emotions expressed regarding the Covid-19 vaccine in content published in Brazilian Portuguese on TikTok, a video sharing platform that has recently experienced global popularity. Our data set for this investigation was comprised of posts including the hashtag #vacina (vaccine), extracted using the Python TikTokAPI library. Emotions were identified and classified using standardized descriptors from the Human-Machine Interaction Network on Emotion (HUMAINE) and the Core Affect Model. Given the diversity of content on (...)
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  14. Emotion in motion: perceiving fear in the behaviour of individuals from minimal motion capture displays.Matthew T. Crawford, Christopher Maymon, Nicola L. Miles, Katie Blackburne, Michael Tooley & Gina M. Grimshaw - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion.
    The ability to quickly and accurately recognise emotional states is adaptive for numerous social functions. Although body movements are a potentially crucial cue for inferring emotions, few studies have studied the perception of body movements made in naturalistic emotional states. The current research focuses on the use of body movement information in the perception of fear expressed by targets in a virtual heights paradigm. Across three studies, participants made judgments about the emotional states of others based on motion-capture body movement (...)
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  15. The emotional impact of baseless discrediting of knowledge: An empirical investigation of epistemic injustice.Laura Niemi, Natalia Washington, Clifford Workman, de Brigard Felipe & Migdalia Arcila-Valenzuela - 2024 - Acta Psychologica 244.
    According to theoretical work on epistemic injustice, baseless discrediting of the knowledge of people with marginalized social identities is a central driver of prejudice and discrimination. Discrediting of knowledge may sometimes be subtle, but it is pernicious, inducing chronic stress and coping strategies such as emotional avoidance. In this research, we sought to deepen the understanding of epistemic injustice’s impact by examining emotional responses to being discredited and assessing if marginalized social group membership predicts these responses. We conducted a novel (...)
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  16. Populism’s challenges to political reason: Reconfiguring the public sphere in an emotional culture.Ana Marta González & Alejandro Néstor García Martínez - 2024 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 50 (3):419-446.
    Populism’s Challenges to Political Reason can be seen as a consequence of social and cultural trends, the so called ‘emotional culture’, that have been accentuated in recent decades. By considering those trends, this article aims at shedding light on some distinctive marks of contemporary populism in order to argue for a reconfiguration of the public sphere that, without ignoring emotion, recovers argumentation and persuasion based on facts and reason.
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  17. Populism’s challenges to political reason: Reconfiguring the public sphere in an emotional culture.Ana Marta González & Alejandro Néstor García Martínez - 2024 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 50 (3):419-446.
    Populism’s Challenges to Political Reason can be seen as a consequence of social and cultural trends, the so called ‘emotional culture’, that have been accentuated in recent decades. By considering those trends, this article aims at shedding light on some distinctive marks of contemporary populism in order to argue for a reconfiguration of the public sphere that, without ignoring emotion, recovers argumentation and persuasion based on facts and reason.
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  18. ‘Take your unseen heart and make it into art’: Aesthetic Transformation and Emotional Democracy.Josef Früchtl - 2024 - Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 3 (1):85-96.
    This article wants to answer three questions: first, why is not only sensibility but visibility important for modern democracy? Second, why is art or aesthetic experience important for both democracy and visibility? And third, how is it possible that aesthetic experience generates effects that conduce to democracy? Answering these questions aims at highlighting an inner connection between democracy, feelings and aesthetics. For a democratic community, on the one hand, cannot exclude feelings from political discourse, but, on the other hand, cannot (...)
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  19. How Public Statues Wrong: Affective Artifacts and Affective Injustice.Alfred Archer - forthcoming - Topoi:1-11.
    In what way might public statues wrong people? In recent years, philosophers have drawn on speech act theory to answer this question by arguing that statues constitute harmful or disrespectful forms of speech. My aim in this paper will be add a different theoretical perspective to this discussion. I will argue that while the speech act approach provides a useful starting point for thinking about what is wrong with public statues, we can get a fuller understanding of these wrongs by (...)
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  20. Emotions and the Action Analogy: Prospects for an Agential Theory of Emotions.Hichem Naar - 2024 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 10 (1):64-78.
    According to the action analogy, emotions and actions have certain structural and normative similarities that no theory of emotions should ignore. The action analogy has recently been used in an objection against the so-called perceptual theory of emotions, often defended by means of an analogy between emotion and perception. Beyond the dialectical significance of the action analogy, one might wonder whether it can support a picture of emotions as fundamentally action-like—what I call an agential theory. This article is a first (...)
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  21. The Role of Emotions in the Capabilities Approach: A Critical Analysis.Giulio Sacco - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    The capabilities approach is the theory according to which, in order to assess people's quality of life and reflect on the basic political entitlements, we should consider what people are capable of doing and being. Focusing mostly on Nussbaum's account, a number of scholars analysed the metaethical structure underlying the approach, showing her Aristotelian and Kantian sources. This article explores another aspect of Nussbaum's theory which has so far been somewhat overlooked: the role of emotions in the justification and motivational (...)
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  22. Reason, Emotion, and the Crisis of Democracy in British Philosophy of the 1930s.Matthew Sterenberg - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (1):22.
    This article examines how British philosophers of the 1930s grappled with the relationship between reason, emotion, and democratic citizenship in the context of a perceived “crisis of democracy” in Europe. Focusing especially on Bertrand Russell, Susan Stebbing, and John Macmurray, it argues that philosophers working from diverse philosophical perspectives shared a sense that the crisis of democracy was simultaneously a crisis of reason and one of emotion. They tended to frame this crisis in terms of three interrelated concerns: first, as (...)
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  23. The Neural Basis of Our Responses to Reading Novels: On Being Moved, the Motion in Emotion.Michael Trimble, Dale Hesdorffer & Robert Letellier - 2024 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 31 (1):204-226.
    Telling tales and reading have been a part of human activity for a very long time. We review in brief the anthropological evidence, then the emergence of the 'modern novel'. This explores in narratives the psychological reflections of the characters concerned with life circumstances including loss, abandonment, despair, illness, dying, and death. We report findings that the response of crying to a novel occurs as often as to music, not reported before: both 'move us'. We note what several critics and (...)
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  24. Introspection in Emotion Research: Challenges and Insights.Leiszle Lapping-Carr, Alek E. Krumm, Cody Kaneshiro & Christopher L. Heavey - 2024 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 31 (1):76-109.
    Introspection, or looking inward to observe one's experience, is inherent in many methods used to study feelings, the experiential component of emotion. Challenges of introspection make faithful, high-fidelity descriptions of feelings difficult to attain. A method that (1) cleaves to a specific moment, (2) cleaves to pristine inner experience, (3) brackets presuppositions, and (4) utilizes an iterative process may be particularly well suited to this task. We review some contemporary introspective methods from the perspective of these four methodological constraints, finding (...)
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  25. Grant Bollmer, The Affect Lab: The History and Limits of Measuring Emotion Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2023. Pp. 290. ISBN 978-1-5179-1546-9. $28.00 (paperback). [REVIEW]Riana Betzler - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Science:1-2.
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  26. La vérité émotionnelle. [REVIEW]Hichem Naar - 2011 - RÉPHA, revue étudiante de philosophie analytique 4:93-104.
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  27. Adaptation of Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale: Its Relationship with Loneliness, Emotional Flexibility and Resilience Among Adolescents.Yakup İme - forthcoming - Polish Psychological Bulletin:201-206.
    Understanding and measuring mental well-being among adolescents has recently become a priority. The validity and reliability study of the 7-item short version of the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (SWEMWBS) has not been examined in Turkish adolescents. Therefore, this study aims to adapt the 7-item Warwick Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale to Turkish and examine the relationships between loneliness, emotional flexibility, resilience, and mental well-being. The data were collected by convenience sampling method from 820 adolescents aged 14-18 from 73 city of (...)
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  28. Self-esteem and emotional reactivity of actors and magicians: a comparative study.Wojciech Napora & Vebjørn Ekroll - forthcoming - Polish Psychological Bulletin:229-244.
    Self-esteem and emotional reactivity may be important personality determinants of human functioning in situations of social exposure. In this study, we compared the levels of these personality variables in a group of professional theater actors and a group of professional illusionists with a control group of participants who were neither actors nor illusionists and had no artistic education. We also examined the correlations between emotional reactivity and self-esteem in the three groups. For emotional reactivity, we found (1) very strong evidence (...)
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  29. Do Psychopathic Traits, Sexual Victimisation Experiences and Emotional Intelligence Predict Attitudes Towards Rape? Examining the Psychosocial correlates of Rape Myth Beliefs among a cross-sectional community sample.Alexander Ioannides & Dominic Willmott - forthcoming - Polish Psychological Bulletin:217-228.
    Vast research has sought to better understand the origins and development of rape myth beliefs given the problematic influence of such misconceptions throughout global societies and criminal justice pathways. The current research aims to build on this body of literature by examining the contribution that psychopathic personality traits (affective responsiveness, cognitive responsiveness, interpersonal manipulation, egocentricity) and emotional intelligence may have upon rape myth beliefs. Furthermore, this study will investigate the extent to which sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity, education), and prior (...)
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  30. Religious Philosophy and Music: Seeing the Religious Emotions in German and Austrian Art Songs From Bach and gounod's "Ave Maria".Wei Hou - 2023 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):201-215.
    This article sheds light on the relationship between religious philosophy and music to emphasize the formulation of religious emotions in art songs. This study's theoretical framework is based on the "Theory of Religious Philosophy and Music" Using these concepts, this paper explores the religious feelings associated with German and Austrian Art Songs by Bach and Gounod's "Ave Maria." The religious emotions of connectedness with God, serenity and love, faith in the heavens and angels, and the assistance of Christ and the (...)
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  31. How doing Philosophy with Children enhances Proprioception of Thinking and Emotional Intelligence.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2020 - Sotsium I Vlast 1:90-95.
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  32. Emotions and body: the possibility of creating unity of we-relationship.A. P. Nazarenko - 2017 - Sociology of Power 29 (3):59-81.
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  33. Psychopharmacologyconstructing emotions: Prozacversus mind-body dualism.S. M. Bardina - 2017 - Sociology of Power 29 (3):41-58.
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  34. Emotions Differentiate Opportunities: Investigating Emotions as a Component in Social Sustainability in Primary School.Lotte Galløe - 2023 - In Jo Krøjer & Luise Li Langergaard (eds.), Social Sustainability in Unsustainable Society: Concepts, Critiques and Counter-Narratives. Springer Verlag. pp. 33-49.
    This chapter focuses on emotionality in primary schools as a dimension of social sustainability. The chapter contributes to the discussion of social sustainability by elucidating how emotionality has significant influence on children’s engagement in primary school. Because emotions tend to be neglected in the general striving for an equal and just school system, this chapter advocates for the need of an increased focus on emotional sustainability within primary schools. By unfolding an empirical example of a testing situation in a Danish (...)
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  35. Emotional and Relational Impoverishment: Social Unsustainability in the Welfare State.Jo Krøjer & Susanne Ekman - 2023 - In Jo Krøjer & Luise Li Langergaard (eds.), Social Sustainability in Unsustainable Society: Concepts, Critiques and Counter-Narratives. Springer Verlag. pp. 15-31.
    Nordic welfare states are often considered to be good examples of social sustainability due to progressive taxing policies, a generous provision of social security and general access to a relatively high standard of welfare services, not least professional care in welfare state institutions like nurseries, kindergartens, and hospital. But if we examine how care is provided and what care giving demands from professional care workers in these welfare state institutions, the picture looks different. In this thorough, empirical analysis of care (...)
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  36. Healthy and Happy? An Ethical Investigation of Emotion Recognition and Regulation Technologies (ERR) within Ambient Assisted Living (AAL).Kris Vera Hartmann, Giovanni Rubeis & Nadia Primc - 2024 - Science and Engineering Ethics 30 (1):1-17.
    Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) refers to technologies that track daily activities of persons in need of care to enhance their autonomy and minimise their need for assistance. New technological developments show an increasing effort to integrate automated emotion recognition and regulation (ERR) into AAL systems. These technologies aim to recognise emotions via different sensors and, eventually, to regulate emotions defined as “negative” via different forms of intervention. Although these technologies are already implemented in other areas, AAL stands out by its (...)
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  37. A Spark Of Emotion: The Impact of Electrical Facial Muscle Activation on Emotional State and Affective Processing.Themis N. Efthimiou - unknown
    Facial feedback, which involves the brain receiving information about the activation of facial muscles, has the potential to influence our emotional states and judgments. The extent to which this applies is still a matter of debate, particularly considering a failed replication of a seminal study. One factor contributing to the lack of replication in facial feedback effects may be the imprecise manipulation of facial muscle activity in terms of both degree and timing. To overcome these limitations, this thesis proposes a (...)
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  38. A Comparative Study of Emotion in Indian and Western Philosophy.Prasasti Pandit & William Krieger - 2024 - Comparative Philosophy: An International Journal of Constructive Engagement of Distinct Approaches Toward World Philosophy 15 (1).
    This paper aims to develop a comparative analysis of the place of emotion from Indian and Western philosophical perspectives. Both Eastern and Indian philosophy consider three mental states as being involved with the arousal of emotions, i.e., cognitive (epistemic), conative (desire), and affective. In Indian philosophy, there is no such single term or specific equivalent definition to the Western term ‘emotion.’ Further, there is no clear dichotomy (cognitive & non-cognitive) between reason and emotion in Indian culture. In Indian scriptures, there (...)
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  39. Response to Focus Issue: Buddhist Moral Emotions.Maria Heim - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):805-814.
    Heim responds to the five articles by anthropologists concerned with contemporary Buddhist practices and ideologies of emotions, arguing that a history of emotions approach that attends to the centrality of emotions and their evaluations can be important for ethics. She submits that while sometimes studies of moral psychology in Buddhist ethics have focused on individuals, these articles suggest how emotions can have a very public and collective impact on social, economic, and political life. She is also interested in how these (...)
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  40. Introduction to the Special Issue on Buddhist Moral Emotions.Jessica Starling & Sara Ann Swenson - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):691-700.
    This introduction to the special issue on “Buddhist Moral Emotions” explains the need for analyzing affect and emotion for a full understanding of Buddhist ethics. The introduction surveys major works in the turn to affect and advocates for ethnographic research on Buddhism as a lived religion in order to address the role of emotion in Buddhist ethics.
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  41. Reappraisal as a means to self-transcendence: Aquinas’s model of emotion regulation informs the extended process model.Anne Jeffrey, Catherine Marple & Sarah Schnitker - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology.
    Recent work in positive psychology demonstrates the importance of self-transcendence: understanding oneself to be part of something greater than the self, such as a family, community, or tradition of sacred practice. Self-transcendence is positively associated with wellbeing and a sense of meaning and purpose. Philosophers have argued that self-transcendent motivation has a central role in good character, or virtue. Positive psychologists are just now beginning to integrate the aim of developing such motivation in character interventions. In this paper we draw (...)
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  42. Teaching Moral Emotions in advance.Amy McKiernan & Daniel Haggerty - forthcoming - Teaching Ethics.
    In this paper, we argue for the value of two complementary pedagogical tools for teaching moral emotions: (1) taxonomies and (2) normative case studies. The paper proceeds in four parts. Section One discusses our motivations for teaching moral emotions. Section Two introduces envy as the central example we use to demonstrate the value of developing a scaffolded approach to teaching moral emotions that moves from taxonomy to normative case studies. Specifically, we engage with Sara Protasi’s The Philosophy of Envy (2021). (...)
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  43. Public goods and public spirit : reflections on and beyond Nussbaum's Political emotions. Des Gasper & Flavio Comim - 2019 - In Lori Keleher & Stacy Kosko (eds.), Agency and Democracy in Development Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  44. Slave Emotion. Anger, Reason and Moral Responsibility in Aristotelian Ethics.Esteban Bieda - 2023 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 33:03322-03322.
    In the present work, I will review how Aristotle understood the connection between reason and emotion - particularly, angry actions - in order to demonstrate that it is due to the presence of intellectual factors that emotions become ethically relevant and not merely an uncontrolled reaction. Then, I will summarize Aristotle's repeated analogies between reason as the master and anger as the slave to explain their connection. My specific contribution to the topic will be to reverse this analogy and, instead (...)
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  45. Beliefs, values and emotions: An interactive approach to distrust in science.Katherine Furman - 2024 - Philosophical Psychology 37 (1):240-257.
    Previous philosophical work on distrust in science has argued that understanding public distrust in science and scientific interventions requires that we pay careful attention not only to epistemic considerations (that is, beliefs about science), but also to values, and the emotional contexts in which assessments of scientific credibility are made. This is likely to be a truncated list of relevant factors for understanding trust/distrust, but these are certainly key areas of concern. The aim of this paper is not to further (...)
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  46. Perceiving the event of emotion.Rebecca Rowson - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    I argue that the direct perception of emotion (DP) is best conceived in terms of event perception, rather than fact perception or object perception. On neither of these two traditional models can the perception of emotion be as direct as its counterpart in ordinary perception; the proponent of DP must either drop the ‘direct’ claim or embrace a part-whole model of emotion perception and its problems. But our best account of how we perceive events directly can be applied to emotion (...)
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  47. Emotions and Mahābhārata: A Phenomenological Study of Yudhiṣṭhira’s Grief in Śānti Parva.Saurabh Todariya - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):93-102.
    The complexity and fluidity of emotions in the epic of Mahābhārata present before us an interesting case for delving into the phenomenology of emotions. In the rationalist tradition of Kant, emotions are considered as an impediment to moral discernment. The rationalist account of emotions considers it as an animal instinct which needs to be controlled through the exercise of Reason. The paper problematizes the rationalist interpretation of emotions mainly on two counts. First, it ignores the evaluative content of the emotions (...)
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  48. Interpersonal Emotions as Emergent Phenomena: Social Neuroscience Beyond Western Cultural Constructions.Kaitlyn Penchina - unknown
    Because science as it exists today is a cultural construction of the West, studies of neuroscience have often been limited by Western perspectives. In particular, the Western proclivity towards individualism has led to a field of neuroscience which has historically focused on studying single individuals, as opposed to social or collective neuroscience. For the most part, it has just been assumed that collective phenomena such as interpersonal emotions must be able to be reduced in terms of individual phenomena such as (...)
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  49. The Influence of Metaphorical Framing on Emotions and Reasoning About the COVID-19 Pandemic.India M. S. Roberts & Marianna M. Bolognesi - 2024 - Metaphor and Symbol 39 (1):55-74.
    Metaphors can provide a conceptual framework for understanding complex topics and as such, they have frequently been used in COVID-19 discourse. As previous research indicates that conceptual metaphors can influence how people reason about complex topics, the metaphors used to communicate about the pandemic can influence how it is understood and how people respond. This paper investigates the influence of metaphorical framing on emotions and reasoning. An experimental study compares BATTLE and JOURNEY metaphor frames in a hypothetical text (adapted from (...)
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  50. True or False? Viewer Perceptions of Emotional Staff and Stock Photos in the News.Tara Marie Mortensen, Colin Piacentine, Taylor Wen, Nora Bost & Brian McDermott - 2024 - Journal of Media Ethics 39 (1):16-32.
    The phenomenon of multi-used stock photography in the news contradicts the photojournalism professional values of truthful and emotional depictions. This reality echoes other false images increasingly appearing in the media, including deepfakes and artificial intelligence. In the present study, a two (stock and staff photo) by two (positive and negative valence) quasi-experiment is conducted. The dependent variables include: 1) credibility; 2) self-reported arousal level; 3) emotional valence perceptions; 4) fixation duration; and 5) fixation count. Participants viewed staff photos as more (...)
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