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Summary

Continental feminist philosophy refers to feminist thought emerging from various continental philosophical and intellectual traditions. In France in particular, movements such as existentialism, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and deconstruction have been taken up by feminist thinkers, making central questions of gender, sexual difference, women’s sexuality, women’s language, and the presence, or more accurately the absence, of women in the dominant Western philosophical tradition. In the Anglophone context, new areas of continental feminism have emerged including gender theory, feminist race theory, feminist phenomenology, post/de-colonial feminist theory, and queer theory.  Continental feminism includes all these, plus continentally informed critical-feminist approaches to knowledge and science, economic and political structures, cultural practices (arts, popular culture, practices of everyday life), and approaches to and engagements with contemporary and historical figures in the continental philosophical tradition.

Key works Simone de Beauvoir’s insight that “one is not born, but becomes a woman” in de Beauvoir & Parshley 1952 arguably marks the inception of contemporary continental feminism. Other foundational texts for French feminist philosophy include Cixous 1976Irigaray 1985, and Kristeva 1984. Other key figures are Michèle Le Doeuff, Sarah Kofman, and Monique Wittig. For a key text in Italian feminist philosophy, see Cavarero 2002. In the Anglophone context, Butler 1989 has been vastly influential. Butler synthesizes insights from thinkers as diverse as Michel Foucault, Friedrich Nietzsche, J.L. Austin, de Beauvoir, and Wittig among others; this text more or less gave birth to the fields of gender theory and queer theory. Spivak 1981 provides a postcolonial and deconstructive context for French feminism. Cornell 1991 melds deconstruction and Lacanian psychoanalysis into a feminist critique of law. Grosz 1994, takes up the thought of Irigaray and Deleuze along with phenomenology to forge work on the body that became foundational to the confluence of feminism and “new materialisms,” while Young 2004 stands as a key example of feminist phenomenology in the lineage of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.
Introductions

Cahill & Hansen 2003: A fine introductory reader in continental feminism. Davidson et al 2010: Excellent introduction to black feminist continental philosophy. Irigaray 1985: Irigaray's foundational collection of essays and interviews explains her philosophical methodology and early positions on a variety of issues. Olkowski 2000: Offers a slew of recent feminist engagements with French philosophy. Le Dœuff 1990: Essays on being a woman in philosophy in France, rereading the history of Western philosophy as a feminist.

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  1. Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.Ásta Sveinsdóttir & Kim Q. Hall (eds.) - 2021
    This exciting new Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary state of the field in feminist philosophy. The editors' introduction and forty-five essays cover feminist critical engagements with philosophy and adjacent scholarly fields, as well as feminist approaches to current debates and crises across the world. Authors cover topics ranging from the ways in which feminist philosophy attends to other systems of oppression, and the gendered, racialized, and classed assumptions embedded in philosophical concepts, to feminist perspectives on prominent subfields (...)
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  2. Normate.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2020 - In Gail Weiss, Ann V. Murphy & Gayle Salamon (eds.), 50 Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology. Evanston, IL, USA: pp. 243-48.
    This short encyclopedia entry defines the concept of the normate.
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  3. Matricentric Feminism and Mythology in Umaru Landan and Dexter Lyndersay’s Shaihu Umar.Chinyere Lilian Okam - 2020 - International Journal of Current Research in the Humanities 24:354-365.
    This article examines the portrayal of matricentric feminism as well as expounds the issues of mythology and how both informed each other in Umaru Landan and Dexter Lyndersay’s Shaihu Umar. It argues that Fatima’s sojourn in search of her son, Shaihu, is propelled by a will borne out of motherhood and given strength by supernatural forces. The methodological base of the study is qualitative in nature appropriating the concepts of matricentric feminism and mythology as structural scaffoldings while Jacques Derrida’s concept (...)
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  4. Self-Constructions: An Existentialist Approach to Self and Social Identity.Mariam Thalos - 2012 - In Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (ed.), Out from the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 451–92.
    Social relations are the core of a human self. Affiliations shape our social world, and ultimately alliances are the large players on the stage of human history. In the process of forging social links, human beings are sometimes lucky enough to enjoy the exercise of genuine existential freedom. These axioms are at the heart of the feminist account of self and social identity presented in this essay.
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  5. The #MeToo Movement, the Repression of Rape, and Otto Gross.Philip Højme - 2018 - Clio’s Psyche 25 (1):47-50.
    This paper briefly describes the life of Otte Gross and his thoughts on sexuality, society, and repression. This provides the basis to interpret the #MeToo movement as functioning in the same way as a repressed memory that breaks through to consciousness. Gross' suggestion that society "rapes" individuals and his assertion of a primordial matriarchal society are useful insights in understanding the #Metoo movement.
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  6. Methodologies of Kelp: On Feminist Posthumanities, Transversal Knowledge Production and Multispecies Ethics in an Age of Entanglement.Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt & Marietta Radomska - 2020 - In N. Cahoon H. Mehti (ed.), The Kelp Congress. Svolvær, Norway: pp. 11-23.
    We take kelp as material entities immersed in a multitude of relations with other creatures (for whom kelp serves as both nourishment and shelter) and inorganic elements of the milieu it resides in, on the one hand, and as a figuration: a material-semiotic “map of contestable worlds” that encompasses entangled threads of “knowledge, practice and power” (Haraway 1997, 11) in its local and global sense, on the other. While drawing on our field notes from the congress and feminist posthumanities and (...)
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  7. MacCormack, Patricia (Ed.), The Animal Catalyst: Towards Ahuman Theory, Bloomsbury, London and New York, 2014. ISBN: 9781472534446 (Paperback) / 9781472526847 (Cloth), 224 Pp., US$ 34.95 (Paperback) / US$ 104 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Marietta Radomska - 2015 - Somatechnics 5:255-258.
    The ‘Animal Question’ has occupied Western philosophy for more than a decade now. Whether inspired by the rising urgency of the problem of violence towards and exploitation of nonhuman animals perpetuated by science, technology and culture broadly speaking, or by an enthralment with otherness, an increasing number of theorists engage with the concepts of the animal and human–nonhuman relations. These notions become an incessant impetus for creative and critical inquiry and the exploration of philosophical, political, ethical and artistic thinking. What, (...)
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  8. Posthuman Ecologies of the Corpse. [REVIEW]Marietta Radomska - 2019 - Women, Gender and Research 28:124-126.
    Erin E. Edwards’ "The Modernist Corpse: Posthumanism and the Posthumous" offers a unique study of the critical and creative potential of the corpse in the context of (primarily) American modernist literature and other media. Dead bodies, oftentimes “radically dehumanized” (p. 1) and depicted en masse in direct relation to atrocities of colonialism, slavery and World War I, populate modernist literature and art. While many literary theorist whose work focuses on American modernism (as Edwards herself notes), looks at death and corpses (...)
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  9. Unfit Women.Talia Welsh - 2014 - Janus Head 13 (1):58-77.
    Feminist phenomenology has contributed significantly to understanding the negative impact of the objectification of women’s bodies. The celebration of thin bodies as beautiful and the demonization of fat bodies as unattractive is a common component of that discussion. However, when one turns toward the correlation of fat and poor health, a feminist phenomenological approach is less obvious. In this paper, previous phenomenological work on the objectification of women is paralleled to the contemporary encouragement to discipline one’s body in order to (...)
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  10. Non/Living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Techno-Ecologies of Bioart.Marietta Radomska - 2017 - Australian Feminist Studies 32 (94):377-394.
    Bioart is a form of hybrid artistico-scientific practices in contemporary art that involve the use of bio-materials (such as living cells, tissues, organisms) and scientific techniques, protocols, and tools. Bioart-works embody vulnerability (intrinsic to all beings) and depend on (bio)technologies that allow these creations to come into being, endure and flourish but also discipline them. This article focuses on ‘semi-living’ sculptures by The Tissue Culture and Art Project (TC&A). TC&A’s artworks consist of bioengineered mammal tissues grown over biopolymer scaffoldings of (...)
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  11. Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life.Marietta Radomska - 2018 - Somatechnics 8 (2):215-231.
    In the Western cultural imaginaries the monstrous is defined – following Aristotelian categorisations – by its excess, deficiency or displacement of organic matter. These characteristics come to the fore in the field of bioart: a current in contemporary art that involves the use of biological materials (various kinds of soma: cells, tissues, organisms), and scientific procedures, technologies, protocols, and tools. Bioartistic projects and objects not only challenge the conventional ideas of embodiment and bodily boundaries, but also explore the relation between (...)
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  12. From Intersectionality to Interference: Feminist Onto-Epistemological Reflections on the Politics of Representation.Evelien Geerts & Iris van der Tuin - 2013 - Women's Studies International Forum 3 (41).
    This article reviews the debate on ‘intersectionality’ as the dominant approach in gender studies, with an emphasis on the politics of representation. The debate on intersectionality officially began in the late 1980s, though the approach can be traced back to the institutionalization of women's studies in the 1970s and the feminist movement of the 1960s. Black and lesbian feminists have long advocated hyphenated identities to be the backbone of feminist thought. But in recent years, intersectionality has sustained criticism from numerous (...)
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  13. Materialist Philosophies Grounded in the Here And Now: Critical New Materialist Constellations & Interventions in Times Of Terror(Ism).Evelien Geerts - 2019 - Dissertation, University of California, Santa Cruz
    This dissertation, located at the crossroads of Continental political philosophy, feminist theory, critical theory, intellectual history, and cultural studies, provides a critical cartography of contemporary new materialist thought in its various constellations and assemblages, while using diffractive theorizing to examine two Continental terror(ist) events. It is argued that such a critical cartography is not only a novel but also much needed undertaking, as we, more than almost two decades after the Habermas-Derrida dialogues on terror(ism), are in need of a Zeitgeist-adjusted (...)
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  14. Book Review: Vulnerable Futures, Transformative Pasts: On Vulnerability, Temporality, and Ethics by Miri Rozmarin. [REVIEW]Evelien Geerts - 2020 - Redescriptions: Political Thought, Conceptual History and Feminist Theory 23:2.
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  15. Being Haunted by—and Reorienting Toward—What ‘Matters’ in Times of (the COVID-19) Crisis: A Critical Pedagogical Cartography of Response-Ability.Evelien Geerts - 2021 - In Higher Education Hauntologies Living with Ghosts for a Justice-to-come.
    Recent new materialist and posthumanist research in curriculum and pedagogy studies is focusing more and more on the intertwinement between social justice, fairness, and accountability, and how to put these ideals to use to create inclusive, consciousness-raising canons, curricula, and pedagogies that take the dehumanized and the more-than-human into account. Especially pedagogical responsibility, often rephrased as ‘response-ability’ to accentuate the entanglements that this notion engenders versus forgotten or forcefully eradicated knowledges, and between teacher and student as intra-active learners, is highlighted (...)
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  16. Responsibility in Cases of Structural and Personal Complicity: A Phenomenological Analysis.Charlotte Knowles - 2021 - The Monist 104 (2):224-237.
    In cases of complicity in one’s own unfreedom and in structural injustice, it initially appears that agents are only vicariously responsible for their complicity because of the roles circumstantial and constitutive luck play in bringing about their complicity. By drawing on work from the phenomenological tradition, this paper rejects this conclusion and argues for a new responsive sense of agency and responsibility in cases of complicity. Highlighting the explanatory role of stubbornness in cases of complicity, it is argued that although (...)
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  17. Continental Feminism.Dilek Huseyinzadegan, Jana McAuliffe, Marie Draz, Tamsin Kimoto, Erika Brown, Jameliah Shorter Bourhanou & Ege Selin Islekel - 2020 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  18. Modern European Philosophy.George S. Tomlinson - 2019 - The Year's Work in Critical and Cultural Theory 27 (1):220–241.
    This chapter reviews four books published in 2018 which are not readily categorized as works in ‘modern European philosophy’: Gurminder K. Bhambra, Kerem Nişancloğlu, and Dalia Gebrial’s edited volume Decolonising the University, Chantal Mouffe’s For a Left Populism, Cinzia Arruzza, Tithi Bhattacharya, and Nancy Fraser’s Feminism for the 99%, and Andreas Malm’s The Progress of this Storm. Yet their uneasy relationship to this philosophy is precisely the reason they constitute a significant contribution to it. The philosophical originality and critical purchase (...)
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  19. Deterritorialising Death: Queerfeminist Biophilosophy and Ecologies of the Non/Living in Contemporary Art.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - Australian Feminist Studies 35 (104).
    In the contemporary context of environmental crises and the degradation of resources, certain habitats become unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and species extinction. Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency and relationality as crucial characteristics of life shared by all organisms, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between humans and nonhumans, particularly evident in the context of death. On the one hand, death appears as a process common to all forms of life; on the other, as an (...)
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  20. Feminisms and Challenges to Institutionalized Philosophy of Religion.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2018 - Religions 9 (4):113.
    For my invited contribution to this special issue of Religions on “Feminisms and the Study of ‘Religions,’” I focus on philosophy of religion and contestations over its relevance to the academic field of Religious Studies. I amplify some feminist philosophers’ voices—especially Pamela Sue Anderson—in corroboration with recent calls from Religious Studies scholars to diversify philosophy of religions in the direction of locating it properly within the current state of Religious Studies. I want to do this by thinking through two proposals (...)
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  21. Ain’T We All “Looking at the World Through a Keyhole”? Science, Magic, and Bias.Carina Pape - 2018 - In Marc D. White (ed.), Doctor Strange and Philosophy. Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: pp. 78-87.
    Marvel Comics legends Stan Lee and Steve Ditko first introduced Doctor Stephen Strange to the world in 1963—and his spellbinding adventures have wowed comic book fans ever since. Over fifty years later, the brilliant neurosurgeon-turned-Sorcerer Supreme has finally travelled from the pages of comics to the big screen, introducing a new generation of fans to his mind-bending mysticism and self-sacrificing heroics. In Doctor Strange and Philosophy, Mark D. White takes readers on a tour through some of the most interesting and (...)
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  22. Comments on Johanna Oksala’s Feminist Experiences. [REVIEW]Andreea Aldea - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (1):125-134.
  23. Book Review: Agape, Eros, Gender: Towards a Pauline Sexual Ethics WatsonFrancisCambridge University Press, New York, 2000. 268 Pp. $59.95 . ISBN 0-521-66263-X. [REVIEW]Deborah F. Sawyer - 2001 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 55 (2):204-206.
  24. Quantifier Vs. Poetry: Stylistic Impoverishment and Socio-Cultural Estrangement of Anglo-American Philosophy in the Last Hundred Years. Aranyosi - 2012 - The Pluralist 7 (1):94.
    Recent discussion, both in the academia-related popular media and in some professional academic venues, about the current state and role of mainstream Anglo-American analytic philosophy among the humanities, has revealed a certain uneasiness expressed by both champions of this approach and traditional adversaries of it regarding its perceived isolation from the other fields of humanities. The fiercer critics go as far as to claim that the image of this type of philosophizing in the contemporary world is one of a discipline (...)
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  25. After the Kantian Analytic/Synthetic Contrast: Social Epistemology From Hegel to Derrida and Fricker.Victoria I. Burke - 2017 - Social Epistemology 31 (5):484-496.
    In this article, I lend support to Miranda Fricker's work in social epistemology from a post-Kantian point of view. In Epistemic Injustice: Power and The Ethics of Knowing, Fricker writes that, at times, social power, rather than the actual possession of knowledge, determines whether a speaker is believed (Fricker, 2007, 1-2). I will develop Miranda Fricker's project in feminist epistemology by examining the post-Kantian linguistic sign with a view to showing how G.W.F. Hegel and Jacques Derrida transform the Kantian analytic/synthetic (...)
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  26. Timing Problems: When Care and Violence Converge in Stephen King's Horror Novel Christine.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):397-414.
    Judith Butler, Joan Tronto, and Stephen King all hinge human experience on shared ontological vulnerability, but whereas Butler and Tronto use vulnerability to build ethical commitments, King exploits aging, disability, and death to frighten us. King's horror genre is provocative for the imaginative landscape of feminist theory precisely because he uses vulnerability to magnify the anxieties of mass culture. In Christine, the characters' shared susceptibility to psychic and physical injury blurs the boundary between care and violence. Like Butler, King depicts (...)
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  27. From the Love Studio.Asma Abbas - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):199-204.
  28. Feminist Fears In Ethics.Nel Noddings - 1990 - Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):59-65.
  29. Feminist Interpretations of Immanuel Kant. Edited by Robin May Schott. University Park: Pennsylvania State Press, 1997.Mechthild Nagel - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):169-172.
  30. Patterns of Dissonance: A Study of Women in Contemporary Philosophy.Rosi Braidotti - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):208-211.
  31. The Philosopher Queen: Feminist Essays on War, Love, and Knowledge.Alison Bailey - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):218-221.
  32. Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity.Sunera Thobani - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):221-224.
  33. Just Cause: Freedom, Identity, and Rights.Linda Alcoff - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):225-228.
  34. Critique, Norm, and Utopia: A Study of the Foundations of Critical Theory.Iris Marion Young - 1986. - Ethics 98 (2):410-411.
  35. Von Netzen Und Anderen Versponnenen Wünschen. Die (Virtuelle) Internationale Frauenuniversität Als Cyborgbaustelle? - Eine Innenperspektive.Eva Hartmann - 2001 - Die Philosophin 12 (24):115-123.
  36. Honoring Gertrude Ezorsky: The Society for Women in Philosophy’s 1997 Distinguished Woman Professor.Nanette Funk & Andrew Wengraf - 1998 - Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):126-132.
    The paper included here was presented by Nanette Funk in Honor of Gertrude Ezorsky, the famed philosopher, feminist, and antiracism activist, at the 1997 Meeting of the Society for Women in Philosophy. It is published here as presented. Thus, although it is a coauthored talk the “I” refers to Nanette Funk.
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  37. Feminist Justice.James P. Sterba - 1991 - Social Philosophy Today 5:343-356.
  38. On Orientation in Thought: Hannah Arendt and Michèle Le Dœuff.Marguerite La Caze - 2007 - International Studies in Philosophy 39 (4):77-102.
    Immanuel Kant, in ‘What is Orientation in Thinking?’ focuses on reason as the touchstone for speculative thought. The question of how to orient ourselves in thinking is still pressing, particularly if one does not take reason as providing principles for judgment. Hannah Arendt and Michèle Le Dœuff focus on this problem of orientation from a practical point of view and build up a compelling picture of how we can orient our thought. Both take imagination to be central to good judgment, (...)
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  39. Introduction: Performance, Medial Innovation and Culture.Asunción López-Varela Azcárate - 2016 - Cultura 13 (2):7-12.
  40. The Dancing Woman Is the Woman Who Dances Into the Future: Rancière, Dance, Politics. Mills - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (4):482-499.
    The dancer is not a woman dancing, for these juxtaposed reasons; that is not a woman, but a metaphor summing up one of the elementary aspects of our form: knife, goblet, flower etc., and that she is not dancing, but suggesting through the miracle of bends and leaps, a kind of corporal writing, what it would take pages of prose, dialogue and description to express. In this article I examine the problematic position Jacques Rancière holds in his political philosophy with (...)
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  41. Sexuality and Convention: On the Situation of Psychoanalysis.Stephen W. Melville - 1986 - Substance 15 (2):75.
  42. Post/Card/Match/Book/"Envois"/Derrida.David Wills - 1984 - Substance 13 (2):19.
  43. The Flight to Woman.J. E. Stewart - 1966 - New Blackfriars 47 (555):591-593.
  44. Review: S. Benhabib, J. Butler, D. Cornell, N. Fraser: Der Streit um Differenz. Feminismus und Postmoderne in der Gegenwart.Martina Bernasconi - 1994 - Die Philosophin 5 (9):110-113.
  45. Ihrsinn (1990-2004) - "lesbisch-feministische" Klänge con affeto.Franka Fieseler - 2005 - Die Philosophin 16 (32):91-106.
  46. Review: Claudia Honegger: Die Ordnung der Geschlechter. Die Wissenschaften vom Menschen und das Weib.Bettina Schmitz - 1991 - Die Philosophin 2 (4):73-77.
  47. Can the Subaltern Speak?Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak - 2003 - Die Philosophin 14 (27):42-58.
  48. Transgender-Formation in der Literatur: Geschlechterdiskurs, Identität und Körpererfahrung.Eveline Kilian - 2003 - Die Philosophin 14 (28):67-78.
  49. Neuerscheinungen: Herta Nagl-Docekal/Herlinde Pauer-Studer (Hrsg.): Denken der Geschlechterdifferenz. Neue Fragen Und Perspektiven der Feministischen Philosophie.Andrea Schröder - 1991 - Die Philosophin 2 (4):85-94.
  50. Review: Susanne Schröter: FeMale. Über Grenzverläufe zwischen den Geschlechtern.Esther Kilchmann - 2003 - Die Philosophin 14 (28):97-99.
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