Feminist Aesthetics

Edited by Peg Brand Weiser (Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis, University of Arizona)
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  1. On Justice as Dance.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture.
    This article is part of a larger project that explores how to channel people’s passion for popular arts into legal social justice, by reconceiving law as a kind of poetry and justice as dance, and exploring different possible relationships between said legal poetry and dancing justice. I begin by rehearsing my previous new conception of social justice as organismic empowerment, and my interpretive method of dancing-with. I then apply this method to the following four “ethico-political choreographies of justice”: (1) the (...)
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  2. Changing Perceptions of Beautiful Bodies: The Athletic Agency Model.Peg Brand Weiser - forthcoming - In Andrew Edgar & William Morgan (eds.), Somaesthetics and Sport. Leiden, Netherlands:
    I consider what draws us to perceiving beautiful bodies in art and athletics--repeatedly and over time--that is informed by viewers' changing perceptions derived from recent publications in fashion and sport, the philosophy of sport, feminist film theory and aesthetics under the ever-expanding umbrella of somaesthetics.
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  3. How Beauty Matters.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - forthcoming - In Lee B. Brown David Goldblatt (ed.), Aesthetics: A Reader in Philosophy of the Arts. Routledge.
    How do we view, understand and appreciate a complex and challenging work of visual art such as Leon Mostovoy's Transfigure and how, in our encounter with it, does beauty matter? Transfigure Project--a 2013 book, film and photographic installation that is now also an interactive website (http://transfigureproject.com/)--is "a project of corporal self-expression, presented as an experimental, visual feast" by which 'transfigure' means "to transform into something more beautiful or elevated." Photographs of fifty nude trans-identified figures can be playfully arranged in numerous (...)
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  4. Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.Ásta Sveinsdóttir & Kim Q. Hall (eds.) - 2021
    This exciting new Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary state of the field in feminist philosophy. The editors' introduction and forty-five essays cover feminist critical engagements with philosophy and adjacent scholarly fields, as well as feminist approaches to current debates and crises across the world. Authors cover topics ranging from the ways in which feminist philosophy attends to other systems of oppression, and the gendered, racialized, and classed assumptions embedded in philosophical concepts, to feminist perspectives on prominent subfields (...)
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  5. Afro-Latin Dance as Reconstructive Gestural Discourse: The Figuration Philosophy of Dance on Salsa.Joshua M. Hall - 2020 - Research in Dance Education 22:1-15.
    The Afro-Latin dance known as ‘salsa’ is a fusion of multiple dances from West Africa, Muslim Spain, enslaved communities in the Caribbean, and the United States. In part due to its global origins, salsa was pivotal in the development of the Figuration philosophy of dance, and for ‘dancing with,’ the theoretical method for social justice derived therefrom. In the present article, I apply the completed theory Figuration exclusively to salsa for the first time, after situating the latter in the dance (...)
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  6. The Banality of Anal: Safer Sexual Erotics in the Gay Men’s Health Crisis’ Safer Sex Comix and Ex Aequo’s Alex et la vie d’après.Jordana Greenblatt - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (1):33-51.
    Analyzing two harm reduction comics campaigns—one early in the AIDS crisis and one more recent, I explore tensions between queer safer sexual erotics and national discourses of sexual norms/deviation raised by Cindy Patton and William Haver at the height of AIDS discourse theory in 1996, approximately halfway between the comics. Using these theorists’ reflections on the history of AIDS activism/representation as a hinge, I explore the manifestation/transformation a decade later of the ethical, educational, and erotic issues they raise. Both foreground (...)
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  7. First-Personal Body Aesthetics as Affirmations of Subjectivity.Madeline Martin-Seaver - 2019 - Contemporary Aesthetics 17.
    This paper redirects some of the philosophical discussion of sexual objectification. Rather than contributing further to debates over what constitutes objectification and whether it is harmful, I argue that aesthetic experience is a useful tool for resisting objectification. Attending to our embodied experiences provides immediate evidence that we are subjects; aesthetically attending to that evidence is a way of valuing it. I consider the human body as an aesthetic site, then as an ethico-aesthetic site, and finally as a site of (...)
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  8. Resisting Hegemony Through Noise.Casey Robertson - 2019 - Assuming Gender 8 (7.1):50-73.
    This essay examines the cultural phenomena of noise in its perceived social constructions and demonstrates its emergence as a form of resistance against prevailing dominant hegemonic codes of culture. In particular, the paper explores the ability of noise to be enacted as a tool to escape the shackles of heteronormative constructions of sexuality and gender in the cultural landscape of the United States. Examined to support this argument are the contrasting works of two American artists: John Cage and Emilie Autumn. (...)
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  9. Beyond the Call of Beauty: Everyday Aesthetic Demands Under Patriarchy.Alfred Archer & Lauren Ware - 2018 - The Monist (1):114-127.
    This paper defends two claims. First, we will argue for the existence of aesthetic demands in the realm of everyday aesthetics, and that these demands are not reducible to moral demands. Second, we will argue that we must recognise the limits of these demands in order to combat a widespread form of gendered oppression. The concept of aesthetic supererogation offers a new structural framework to understand both the pernicious nature of this oppression and what may be done to mitigate it.
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  10. Dancing Feminist Conversations: Never Without Materiality.Dana Mills & Sarah Drews Lucas - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):241-249.
  11. Microbiopolitics in Art: Joyful Acts of Insurrection.Mariana Pérez Bobadilla - 2018 - Technoetic Arts 16 (3):303-313.
    This article explores projects of art and biology as joyful acts of insurrection. It presents critical and creative perspectives to generate alternative structures of subjec-tivity. These alternative structures gain relevance when intersectional variables of privilege and discrimination as political tools are set in crisis by a postanthropocen-tric awareness. The thesis of this article is that in order to understand and develop postanthropocentric intersectional positions, the microbial posthuman joins thecartographies of the posthuman as a material possibility from microscopic biologicalmatter and philosophical (...)
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  12. Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life.Marietta Radomska - 2018 - Somatechnics 8 (2):215-231.
    In the Western cultural imaginaries the monstrous is defined – following Aristotelian categorisations – by its excess, deficiency or displacement of organic matter. These characteristics come to the fore in the field of bioart: a current in contemporary art that involves the use of biological materials (various kinds of soma: cells, tissues, organisms), and scientific procedures, technologies, protocols, and tools. Bioartistic projects and objects not only challenge the conventional ideas of embodiment and bodily boundaries, but also explore the relation between (...)
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  13. Sexual Objectification, Objectifying Images, and 'Mind-Insensitive Seeing-As'.Kathleen Stock - 2018 - In Anna Berqvist & Robert Cowan (eds.), Evaluative Perception. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter defends a theory of objectification, conceiving of it as a species of what aestheticians have called ‘seeing‐as’, and more specifically, a kind of seeing‐as which to some degree is insensitive to the mind or mental aspects. An advantage of this view is that it covers both sexual and racial objectification, and can also explain how photographic images can objectify their subjects: namely, by encouraging the viewer to view in a way insensitive to the mind or mental aspects of (...)
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  14. Timing Problems: When Care and Violence Converge in Stephen King's Horror Novel Christine.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):397-414.
    Judith Butler, Joan Tronto, and Stephen King all hinge human experience on shared ontological vulnerability, but whereas Butler and Tronto use vulnerability to build ethical commitments, King exploits aging, disability, and death to frighten us. King's horror genre is provocative for the imaginative landscape of feminist theory precisely because he uses vulnerability to magnify the anxieties of mass culture. In Christine, the characters' shared susceptibility to psychic and physical injury blurs the boundary between care and violence. Like Butler, King depicts (...)
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  15. Trump is Gross: Taking the Politics of Taste (and Distaste) Seriously.Shelley M. Park - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):23-42.
    This paper advances the somewhat unphilosophical thesis that “Trump is gross” to draw attention to the need to take matters of taste seriously in politics. I begin by exploring the slipperiness of distinctions between aesthetics, epistemology, and ethics, subsequently suggesting that we may need to pivot toward the aesthetic to understand and respond to the historical moment we inhabit. More specically, I suggest that, in order to understand how Donald Trump was elected President of the United States and in order (...)
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  16. Reading Rainer Fassbinder’s Adaptation Fontane Effi Briest.Adile Aslan Almond - 2016 - Cultura 13 (2):83-102.
    Fontane Effi Briest by the German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder is arguably one of the greatest adaptations from literature to screen, and the best Effi Briest adaptation. Although the first reception of the movie, when it appeared in 1974, was not without unmixed reviews, most scholars nowadays share the conviction that it is a masterpiece. Elke Siegel defines the film as a success both at the Berlinale and at the box office. Kreft Wetzel, however, in an interview with Fassbinder in (...)
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  17. The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy.Ann Garry, Serene J. Khader & Alison Stone (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Feminist Philosophy_ is an outstanding guide and reference source to the key topics, subjects, thinkers, and debates in feminist philosophy. Fifty-six chapters, written by an international team of contributors specifically for the _Companion_, are organized into five sections: Engaging the Past Mind, Body, and World Knowledge, Language, and Science Intersections Ethics, Politics, and Aesthetics. The volume provides a mutually enriching representation of the several philosophical traditions that contribute to feminist philosophy. It also foregrounds issues of global (...)
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  18. Misleading Aesthetic Norms of Beauty: Perceptual Sexism in Elite Women's Sports.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Edward B. Weiser - 2016 - In Sherri Irvin (ed.), Body Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 192-221.
    The history of gender challenges faced by women in elite sports is fraught with controversy and injustice. These athletes' unique physical beauty creates what appears to be a paradox yet is, in fact, scientifically predictable. Intense training for the highest levels of competition leads to unique bodily strength and rare beauty associated with specific anatomic changes, leading top athletes to be singled out as exceptions from their gender and even excluded from competing. Authorities like the IOC and IAF, as well (...)
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  19. The Role of Luck in Originality and Creativity.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):31-55.
    In this article I explore the concept of originality from several viewpoints. Within the world of printmaking, I show that while print dealers may draw attention to originality in order to enhance economic value, artists emphasize the aesthetic value of a work based on the freedom to express artistic intent and to experiment with techniques of the medium. Within the worlds of philosophy and to some extent, psychology, “originality” has been misleadingly tied to the notions of “creativity” and “genius,” thereby (...)
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  20. Octavia Butler and the Aesthetics of the Novel.Therí A. Pickens - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):167-180.
    Octavia Butler depicts a character with physical or mental disability in each of her works. Yet scholars hesitate to discuss her work in terms that emphasize the intersection with disability. Two salient questions arise: How might it change Butler scholarship if we situated intersectional embodied experience as a central locus for understanding her work? Once we privilege such intersectionality, how might this transform our understanding of the aesthetics of the novel? In this paper, I reorient the criticism of Butler's work (...)
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  21. La Chiesa di San Menna a Sant’Agata de’Goti ,a Cura di Franco Iannotta, Salerno: Arci Postiglione, 2014; Nino Zchomelidse, Art, Ritual and Civic Identity in Medieval Southern Italy,University Park : The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2014.Elisabetta Scirocco - 2015 - Convivium 2 (2):156-164.
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  22. Josh Ellenbogen. Reasoned and Unreasoned Images: The Photography of Bertillon, Galton, and Marey. Xi + 265 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012. $74.95. [REVIEW]Kelley Wilder - 2015 - Isis 106 (2):469-471.
  23. Feminism: Feminisms and Tradition.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2014 - In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press. pp. 22-26.
    Feminism came to the discipline of philosophical aesthetics rather late--approximately 1990--in spite of advances made much earlier in the 1970s by feminist scholars in related fields such as literary theory, art history, art criticism, and film studies. This essay tracks notions of "tradition" within the history of aesthetics and subsequent feminist challenges to patriarchal traditions and existing philosophical practices. No one unitary feminist approach is sought; rather a multiplicity of feminisms have arisen within aesthetics that have brought new focus to (...)
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  24. Unfit Women.Talia Welsh - 2014 - Janus Head 13 (1):58-77.
    Feminist phenomenology has contributed significantly to understanding the negative impact of the objectification of women’s bodies. The celebration of thin bodies as beautiful and the demonization of fat bodies as unattractive is a common component of that discussion. However, when one turns toward the correlation of fat and poor health, a feminist phenomenological approach is less obvious. In this paper, previous phenomenological work on the objectification of women is paralleled to the contemporary encouragement to discipline one’s body in order to (...)
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  25. Rachel Poliquin. The Breathless Zoo: Taxidermy and the Cultures of Longing. 259 Pp., Illus., Index. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Hanson - 2013 - Isis 104 (3):599-600.
  26. Oppression, Privilege, & Aesthetics: The Use of the Aesthetic in Theories of Race, Gender, and Sexuality, and the Role of Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Philosophical Aesthetics.Robin James - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (2):101-116.
    Gender, race, and sexuality are not just identities; they are also systems of social organization – i.e., systems of privilege and oppression. This article addresses two main ways privilege and oppression are relevant topics in and for philosophical aesthetics: the role of the aesthetic in privilege and oppression, and the role of philosophical aesthetics, as a discipline and a body of texts, in constructing and naturalizing relations of privilege and oppression . The first part addresses how systems of privilege and (...)
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  27. The Fictional Character of Pornography.Shen-yi Liao & Sara Protasi - 2013 - In Hans Maes (ed.), Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 100-118.
    We refine a line of feminist criticism of pornography that focuses on pornographic works' pernicious effects. A.W. Eaton argues that inegalitarian pornography should be criticized because it is responsible for its consumers’ adoption of inegalitarian attitudes toward sex in the same way that other fictions are responsible for changes in their consumers’ attitudes. We argue that her argument can be improved with the recognition that different fictions can have different modes of persuasion. This is true of film and television: a (...)
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  28. Early Feminist Aesthetics in Japan: Murasaki Shikibu, Sei Shonagon, and A Thousand Years of the Female Voice.Mara Miller - 2013 - In Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art: Critical Visions, Creative Engagements. Springer Press.
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  29. Warburg’s “Goddess in Exile”: The “Nymph” Fragment Between Letter and Taxonomy, Read with Heinrich Heine.Sigrid Weigel - 2013 - Critical Horizons 14 (3):271-295.
    As regards Aby Warburg’s oeuvre, it is fascinating that three unfinished or unpublished projects have come to represent the very theorems now appearing of most interest for cultural historians and theorists: The Mnemosyne Atlas representing pictorial memory; the Serpent Ritual as theorem for a cultural-anthropological reading of pagan cultures; and the Nymph Fragment as a foundational figure of modern iconology. This essay undertakes an analysis of the fragmentary character of Warburg’s way of working, arguing that his search for an analytic (...)
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  30. ORLAN Revisited: Disembodied Virtual Hybrid Beauty.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2013 - In Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. pp. 306-340.
    I argued in 2000 that the French artist ORLAN may have moved away from her Reincarnation performances toward her Self-Hybridizations because she thought that in the latter she would be more transparently obvious in meaning and less frequently misunderstood. I may have overstated the ability of audiences to comprehend, however. In this essay I argue that the virtual beauty that ORLAN unfolds in her ongoing series Self-Hybridizations is not a real or actual beauty but rather a fake beauty, causally disembodied, (...)
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  31. The Aesthetics of Childbirth.Peg Brand & Paula Granger - 2012 - In Sheila Lintott & Maureen Sander-Staudt (eds.), Philosophical Inquiries into Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Mothering: Maternal Subjects. Routledge. pp. 215-236.
    Images abound of women throughout the ages engaging in various activities. But why are there so few representations of childbirth in visual art? Feminist artist Judy Chicago once suggested that depictions of women giving birth do not commonly occur in Western culture but can be found in other contexts such as pre-Columbian art or societies previously considered "primitive." Chicago's own exploration of the theme resulted in the creation of The Birth Project (1980-85): an unprecedented series of eighty handcrafted works of (...)
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  32. Affective Resonance: On the Uses and Abuses of Music in and for Philosophy.Robin James - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (2):59-95.
    Because music communicates extra-propositionally, philosophers often use musical concepts and metaphors to discuss implicit and/or affective knowledges. Music is a productive means to philosophically analyze affect, but only when these analyses are grounded in rigorous studies of actual musical works and practices. When we don’t ground our study of music in musical practices, works, and theories, “music” just becomes a mirror of whatever assumptions and biases we already have. I show how the overly-abstract treatment of music and sound in Jean-Luc (...)
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  33. Skin/Ned Politics: Species Discourse and the Limits of “The Human” in Nandipha Mntambo's Art.Ruth Lipschitz - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):546-566.
    In this paper I focus on recent artworks by South African artist Nandipha Mntambo. I read these for the ways in which the discourse of species works within and against the humanist sacrificial economy of the subject that Jacques Derrida calls “carno-phallogocentric”. Drawing on Derrida's “metonymy of ‘eating well,'” Achille Mbembe's analysis of colonial violence, and Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection, I argue that these works inscribe and disturb a speciesist, sexual, and racial politics of animalization, and do so by (...)
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  34. Art and Pornography: Philosophical Essays.Hans Maes & Jerrold Levinson (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Art and Pornography presents a series of essays which investigate the artistic status and aesthetic dimension of pornographic pictures, films, and literature, and explores the distinction, if there is any, between pornography and erotic art. Is there any overlap between art and pornography, or are the two mutually exclusive? If they are, why is that? If they are not, how might we characterize pornographic art or artistic pornography, and how might pornographic art be distinguished, if at all, from erotic art? (...)
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  35. Jenny Saville Remakes the Female Nude – Feminist Reflections on the State of the Art.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2012 - In Peg Brand (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press.
    Jenny Saville is a leading contemporary painter of female nudes. This paper explores her work in light of theories of gender and embodied agency. Recent work on the phenomenology of embodiment draws a distinction between the body image and the body schema. The body image is your representation of your own body, including your visual image of it and your emotional attitudes towards it. The body schema is comprised of your proprioceptive knowledge, your corporeally encoded memories, and your corporeal proficiency (...)
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  36. The Viability of the Philosophical Novel: The Case of Simone de Beauvoir's She Came to Stay.Ashley King Scheu - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):791-809.
    This article begins by asking if the project to write a philosophical novel is not inherently flawed; it would seem that the novelist must either write an ambiguous text, which would not create a strong enough argument to count as philosophy, or she must write a text with a clear argument, which would not be ambiguous enough to count as good fiction. The only other option available would be to exemplify a preexisting abstract philosophical system in the concrete literary world. (...)
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  37. Seductive Piety: Faith and Fashion Through Lipovetsky and Heidegger.Muhammad Velji - 2012 - Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 32 (1):147-155.
    Martin Heidegger broadened the meaning of art to a truth-disclosing event akin to seemingly disparate events such as the founding of a political state, Jesus’s sacrifice for all humankind, and the questioning of a philosopher. Art makes us pay attention to it by presenting the familiar in a new and unfamiliar context and unsettles our presuppositions and reconceptualizes our way of thinking. I begin by explicating the Heideggerian interpretation of the nature of art by looking at the key concepts that (...)
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  38. Ideas About Art.Kathleen Kadon Desmond - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements. -- List of Illustrations. -- Preface. -- 1. Public Opinion/Public Art. -- 2. Non-Western Ideas. -- 3. Western Ideas. -- 4. Beauty. -- 5. Expression & Aesthetic Experience. -- 6. Art & Ethics. -- 7. Political Art, Censorship & Pornography. -- 8. Art & Economics. -- 9. Feminist Art, Aesthetics & Art Criticism. -- 10. Postmodern Art & Attitudes. -- 11. Photography & New Media. -- 12. (Re)Discovering Design. -- 13. Art & Aesthetic Education. -- (...)
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  39. Iranian Cinema and Philosophy: Shooting Truth.Farhang Erfani - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Introduction -- How orphans believe: Deleuze, national cinema and Majidi's The color of paradise. Deleuze: on realism and movement-Image -- Deleuze: neorealism (and a brief analysis of Kiarostami's life and nothing more) -- Majidi: The color of paradise -- Deleuze and Majidi: the faith of Mohammad -- "What are filmmakers for in needy times?" On Heidegger and Kiarostami's Taste of cherry -- An overview of Kiarostami's Taste of cherry and the question of the medium -- Heidegger on art and truth (...)
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  40. Feminist Imperative(s) in Music and Education: Philosophy, Theory, or What Matters Most.Elizabeth Gould - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):130-147.
    A historically feminized profession, education in North America remains remarkably unaffected by feminism, with the notable exception of pedagogy and its impact on curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to describe characteristics of feminism that render it particularly useful and appropriate for developing potentialities in education and music education. As a set of flexible methodological tools informed by Gilles Deleuze's notions of philosophy and art, I argue feminism may contribute to education's becoming more efficacious, reflexive, and reflective of the (...)
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  41. Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life, Politics, and Art.Elizabeth Grosz - 2011 - Duke University Press.
    The inhuman in the humanities : Darwin and the ends of man -- Deleuze, Bergson, and the concept of life -- Bergson, Deleuze, and difference -- Feminism, materialism, and freedom -- The future of feminist theory : dreams for new knowledges -- Differences disturbing identity : Deleuze and feminism -- Irigaray and the ontology of sexual difference -- Darwin and the split between natural and sexual selection -- Sexual difference as sexual selection : Irigarayan reflections on Darwin -- Art and (...)
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  42. Motherhood and the Workings of Disgust.Sherri Irvin - 2011 - In Sheila Lintott & Maureen Sander-Staudt (eds.), Philosophical Inquiries into Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Mothering: Maternal Subjects. Routledge. pp. 79-90.
    I discuss two interrelated ways in which disgust functions in motherhood. First, relaxation of the mother’s sense of disgust allows her to nurture her child more effectively. Second, others’ responses of disgust are used to enforce social norms regarding the “good” mother. If the mother acquiesces, she must continually monitor and tidy her child, which may interfere with the child’s exploration of the world. If she does not, she is subject to ongoing signs that she is flawed or failing as (...)
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  43. Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'.Robin James - 2011 - In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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  44. Art, Self and Knowledge.Keith Lehrer - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Knowing the content of art -- Consciousness, exemplars, and art -- Aesthetic theory, feminist art ,and autonomy -- Value, expression, and globalization -- Artistic creation, freedom, and self -- Aesthetics, death, and beauty -- Aesthetic experience, intentionality, and the form of representation -- Theories of art, and art as theory of the world -- Self-trust, disagreement, and reasonable acceptance -- Social reason, aggregation, and collective wisdom -- Knowledge, autonomy, and art in loop theory.
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  45. Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art.L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.) - 2011 - Springer.
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  46. Addams's Philosophy of Art : Feminist Aesthetics and Moral Imagination at Hull House.L. Ryan Musgrave Bonomo - 2010 - In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  47. Allegro, Ma Non Troppo : On Feminist Becomings.Rosi Braidotti - 2010 - In Henk Oosterling & Ewa Płonowska Ziarek (eds.), Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics. Lexington Books.
  48. Between Poiesis and Praxis: Women and Art.Françoise Collin - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (1):83-92.
    If we think of artistic creation as a basic dimension of humanity we need to question the absence of female artists in history. We should also look at their gradual emergence in the late 20th century, an emergence that coincides with the feminist movement and a change in the conception of art itself, revealed chiefly by Duchamp. But does art by women have some specificity? Without giving a definite answer as far as subject matter is concerned, we note that the (...)
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  49. The (In) Visible Body: Feminism, Phenomenology, and the Case of Cosmetic Surgery.Luna Dolezal - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):357-375.
    This paper will examine the experience of and drive for bodily invisibility in women through the theoretical approaches of phenomenology and social constructionism. An examination of the social disruptions of bodily invisibility and the compulsive avoidance of such instances, particularly with respect to the fastidious maintenance of body comportment and appearance within the narrow parameters afforded by social norms, will lead to an exploration of the conflation of biomedicine with the beauty industry.
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  50. Feminist Art History and De Facto Significance.Susan Feagin - 2010 - In Peg Zeglin Brand & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State Press.
    In her excellent "Feminist Art History and De Facto Significance," for example, aesthetician Susan L. Feagin explains how her initial skepticism about Continental approaches-especially those drawing on Foucault, Marx, Levi-Strauss, Lacan, and "even Derrida and poststructuralist literary theory" - gave way to an appreciation of how these approaches encourage, in a way analytic aesthetics does not, "the trenchant analyses and acute observations that have emerged from feminist art historians" (305). And, indeed, although she goes on to suggest how traditional aesthetics (...)
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