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  1. Is It Bad to Prefer Attractive Partners?William D'Alessandro - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    Philosophers have rightly condemned lookism—that is, discrimination in favor of attractive people or against unattractive people—in education, the justice system, the workplace and elsewhere. Surprisingly, however, the almost universal preference for attractive romantic and sexual partners has rarely received serious ethical scrutiny. On its face, it’s unclear whether this is a form of discrimination we should reject or tolerate. I consider arguments for both views. On the one hand, a strong case can be made that preferring attractive partners is bad. (...)
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  2. Best Practices for Fostering Diversity in Tenure-Track Searches.Amy Olberding, Sherri Irvin & Steve Ellis - 2014 - Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 13 (2):26-35.
    In this essay, we describe practices developed by the philosophy department at the University of Oklahoma to promote fair and inclusive recruitment, application review, and hiring for faculty positions.
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  3. Supreme Confusion About Causality at the Supreme Court.Robin Dembroff & Issa Kohler-Hausmann - forthcoming - CUNY Law Review.
    Twice in the 2020 term, in Bostock and Comcast, the Supreme Court doubled down on the reasoning of “but-for causation” to interpret antidiscrimination statutes. According to this reasoning, an outcome is discriminatory because of some status—say, sex or race—just in case the outcome would not have occurred “but-for” the plaintiff’s status. We think this reasoning embeds profound conceptual errors that render the decisions deeply confused. Furthermore, those conceptual errors tend to limit the reach of antidiscrimination law. In this essay, we (...)
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  4. (What) Are Stereotyping and Discrimination? (What) Do We Want Them to Be?Alex Madva - 2021 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 10 (11):43-51.
    Comment on Beeghly, Erin. 2021. “Stereotyping as Discrimination: Why Thoughts Can Be Discriminatory.” Social Epistemology 35 (6): 547–63. -/- Beeghly’s “Stereotyping as Discrimination” is—characteristically—clear, thorough, and persuasive, rich with incisive arguments and thought-provoking case studies. In defending the view that stereotyping often constitutes discrimination, she makes a powerful case that, “Living ethically means cultivating a certain kind of ‘inner’ life and avoiding pernicious habits of thought, no matter how culturally pervasive” (Beeghly 2021b, 13). Support for such claims is traced back (...)
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  5. Free to Be You and Me: An Introduction to Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Patti Tamara Lenard - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1048-1055.
  6. The Significance of Being Gay in Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Kerri Woods - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1076-1082.
  7. On Being Good Gay: ‘Covering’ and the Social Structure of Being LGBT+.Annamari Vitikainen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1083-1090.
  8. Patterned Inequality, Compounding Injustice, and Algorithmic Prediction.Benjamin Eidelson - 2021 - American Journal of Law and Equality 1 (1):252-276.
    If whatever counts as merit for some purpose is unevenly distributed, a decision procedure that accurately sorts people on that basis will “pick up” and reproduce the pre-existing pattern in ways that more random, less merit-tracking procedures would not. This dynamic is an important cause for concern about the use of predictive models to allocate goods and opportunities. In this article, I distinguish two different objections that give voice to that concern in different ways. First, decision procedures may contribute to (...)
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  9. Discrimination and Equality of Opportunity.Carl Knight - 2018 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. London, UK: pp. 140-150.
    Discrimination, understood as differential treatment of individuals on the basis of their respective group memberships, is widely considered to be morally wrong. This moral judgment is backed in many jurisdictions with the passage of equality of opportunity legislation, which aims to ensure that racial, ethnic, religious, sexual, sexual-orientation, disability and other groups are not subjected to discrimination. This chapter explores the conceptual underpinnings of discrimination and equality of opportunity using the tools of analytical moral and political philosophy.
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  10. Exactly Why Are Slurs Wrong?Thaddeus Metz - 2021 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 84:13-29.
    This article, part of a special issue on 'Expressing Hatred', seeks to provide a comprehensive and fundamental account of why racial epithets and similar slurs are immoral, whenever they are. It considers three major theories, roughly according to which they are immoral because they are harmful (welfarism), because they undermine autonomy (Kantianism), or because they are unfriendly (an under-considered, relational approach informed by ideas from the Global South). This article presents new objections to the former two theories, and concludes in (...)
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  11. The Limits of Liberal Integrity.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):635-641.
  12. Prioritizing the Prevention of Early Deaths During Covid‐19.Govind Persad - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (2):42-43.
    In this Correspondence, I argue that given that scarcity has existed both for critical care resources and for vaccines, allocating critical care resources to prioritize the prevention of early COVID-19 deaths (i.e. COVID-19 deaths among younger patients) could valuably counterbalance the disproportionate exclusion of minority patients and those with life shortening disabilities that age-based vaccine allocation produces. -/- Covid-19 deaths early in life have overwhelmingly befallen minorities and people with life-shortening disabilities. Policies preventing early deaths prevent an outcome widely recognized (...)
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  13. What Makes Epistemic Injustice an “Injustice”?Morten Fibieger Byskov - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):114-131.
  14. Rights as weapons: Instruments of conflict, tools of power.Nicola Perugini - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):41-44.
  15. Righting Domestic Wrongs with Refugee Policy.Matthew Lindauer - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-18.
    Discriminatory attitudes towards Muslim refugees are common in liberal democracies, and Muslim citizens of these countries experience high rates of discrimination and social exclusion. Uniting these two facts is the well-known phenomenon of Islamophobia. But the implications of overlapping discrimination against citizens and non-citizens have not been given sustained attention in the ethics of immigration literature. In this paper, I argue that liberal societies have not only duties to discontinue refugee policies that discriminate against social groups like Muslims, but remedial (...)
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  16. Hate Speech as Antithetical to Free Speech: The Real Polarity.Tiffany Elise Montoya - forthcoming - In Jennifer Kling & William Barnes (eds.), In Politics Polarity and Peace. Leiden, Netherlands:
    I claim that hate speech is actually antithetical to free speech. Nevertheless, this claim invokes the misconception that one would be jeopardizing free speech due to a phenomenon known as "false polarization" – a “tendency for disputants to overestimate the extent to which they disagree about whatever contested question is at hand.” The real polarity does not lie between hate speech (as protected free speech) vs. censorship. Rather, hate speech is censorship. It is the censorship of entire sectors of the (...)
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  17. De-Moralizing Gay Rights: A Reply to My Critics.Cyril Ghosh - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-9.
  18. De-Moralizing Gay Rights – an Overview.Cyril Ghosh - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-5.
  19. Covering and the Moral Duty to Resist Oppression.Peter Higgins - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-8.
    Do LGBT+ persons have a moral duty of some form to resist heterosexist oppression by refusing to “cover” (i.e., “to ‘disattend,’ or tone down, their (despised) sexuality in an effort to fit into and be accepted by the mainstream” (Ghosh 2018, 273))? Writing in response to Kenji Yoshino (Yoshino 2002 and 2006), Cyril Ghosh argues that such a duty would itself be oppressive. In this reply to Ghosh’s new book, I wish to argue that while Ghosh demonstrates that Yoshino’s critique (...)
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  20. Education, Epistemic Virtues, and the Power of Toleration.Johannes Drerup - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-24.
  21. Toleration and Modus Vivendi.John Horton - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):45-63.
  22. The Politics and Ethics of Toleration: Introduction.Johannes Drerup & Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):1-4.
  23. Can a Value-Neutral Liberal State Still Be Tolerant?Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):25-44.
  24. Pluralism and the Authority of Groups to Discriminate.Avigail Eisenberg - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
  25. Differentiating Hate Speech: A Systemic Discrimination Approach.Katharine Gelber - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
    In this paper I develop a systemic discrimination approach to defining a narrowly construed category of ‘hate speech’, as speech that harms to a sufficient degree to warrant government regulation. This is important due to the lack of definitional clarity, and the extraordinarily wide usage, of the term. This article extends current literature on how hate speech can harm by identifying under what circumstances speakers have the capacity to harm, and under what circumstances targets are vulnerable to harm. It also (...)
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  26. Theorizing White Racial Domination and Racial Justice: A Reply to Christopher Lebron.Charles W. Mills - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy.
  27. Radical Republicanism and Solidarity.Margaret Kohn - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory 21 (1):25-46.
    This article explains how 19th-century radical republicans answered the following question: how is it possible to be free in a social order that fosters economic dependence on others? I focus on th...
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  28. “Nothing Much Had Happened”: Settler Colonialism in Hannah Arendt.David Myer Temin - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511989307.
    Hannah Arendt’s account of imperialism has become an unlikely source of inspiration for scholars invested in anti-colonial and postcolonial critique. However, the role of settler colonialism in her thought has come under far less scrutiny. This essay reconstructs Arendt’s account of settler-colonization. It argues that Arendt’s republican analysis of imperialism hinges on her notion of the boomerang effect, which is absent in settler-colonial contexts. Arendt recognized some of the distinctive features of settler expansionism but reproduced many of the ideologies that (...)
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  29. Engaging Vulnerabilities: An Outline for a Responsive and Responsible Theory.Mihaela Mihai - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (4):583-607.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  30. A Moral Framework for Understanding of Fair ML Through Economic Models of Equality of Opportunity.Hoda Heidari - 2019 - Proceedings of the Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency 1.
    We map the recently proposed notions of algorithmic fairness to economic models of Equality of opportunity (EOP)---an extensively studied ideal of fairness in political philosophy. We formally show that through our conceptual mapping, many existing definition of algorithmic fairness, such as predictive value parity and equality of odds, can be interpreted as special cases of EOP. In this respect, our work serves as a unifying moral framework for understanding existing notions of algorithmic fairness. Most importantly, this framework allows us to (...)
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  31. Species-being for whom? The five faces of interspecies oppression.Mathieu Dubeau - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):596-620.
    There is now an awakening to and recognition of the emotionally complex lives of some non-human animals. While their forms of consciousness may vary, some are indeed conscious and deserve political consideration. What that political consideration ought to be is the central topic of this article. First, I argue that interspecies justice must be understood in terms of the relationships that foster individual flourishing of all concerned. The obstacles to such flourishing are the five faces of oppression famously identified by (...)
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  32. Disabled Lives in Deliberative Systems.Afsoun Afsahi - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (6):751-776.
    This essay argues that the systemic turn in deliberative democracy has opened up avenues to think about disabled citizenship within discursive processes. I highlight the systemic turn’s recognition of the interdependence of individuals and institutions upon each other in a system as key to this project. This recognition has led to three transformations: a more generous account of deliberative speech acts and behaviors; recognition of the role of enclaves; and incorporating the role of discursive representatives. These changes normalize the participation (...)
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  33. Racial Conflation: Agency, Black Action, and Criminal Intent.Alisa Bierria - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy.
  34. Capability Without Dignity?Joseph J. Fischel & Claire McKinney - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3):404-429.
    Dignity may just be the most promiscuous normative abstraction. This article, informed by dignity’s historical variability, political theoretic multipurpose, and conflicting jurisprudence, focuses on a particular but influential invocation of the term: dignity as the normative ground for the ‘capabilities approach’ model of social justice. We ask whether or not the CA, in particular the influential version propounded by philosopher Martha Nussbaum, requires dignity as its foundational premise, and whether or not dignity may be more costly than beneficial for the (...)
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  35. The Value of Longevity.Greg Bognar - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (3):229-247.
    Longevity is valuable. Most of us would agree that it’s bad to die when you could go on living, and death’s badness has to do with the value your life would have if it continued. Most of us would also agree that it’s bad if life expectancy in a country is low, it’s bad if there is high infant mortality and it’s bad if there is a wide mortality gap between different groups in a population. But how can we make (...)
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  36. Lack of Pluralism and Post‐Secularism in Catholic Countries.Sebastián Rudas - 2020 - Constellations 27 (2):258-272.
  37. Whose Lives Matter? The Black Lives Matter Movement and the Contested Legacy of Philosophical Humanism.Andrew J. Pierce - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):261-282.
  38. Democracy’s History of Inegalitarianism: Symposium on Michael Hanchard, The Spectre of Race: How Discrimination Haunts Western Democracy, Princeton University Press, 2018.Robert Gooding-Williams, David Theo Goldberg, Juliet Hooker & Michael G. Hanchard - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (3):357-377.
  39. Extending Voice and Autonomy Through Participatory Action Research: Ethical and Practical IssuesReflections on a Workshop Held at Durham University, November 2018.Sui Ting Kong, Sarah Banks, Toby Brandon, Stewart Chappell, Helen Charnley, Se Kwang Hwang, Danielle Rudd, Sue Shaw, Sam Slatcher & Nicki Ward - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-10.
  40. The Arrogant Eye and the French Prohibition of the Veil.Daniel Alejandro Restrepo - 2019 - [email protected] - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 18 (2):159-174.
    Evânia Reich presents the argument that the veil laws in France—the banning of the full-face coverings in public and the banning of the headscarf in public schools—are consistent with the emancipatory project of French Laïcité. According to this argument, the veils that Muslim women wear are symbols of their oppression, whereas French education seeks to liberate each individual and Laïcité serves as a bulwark against the creeping oppressive influence of religion. Unveiling Muslim women, then, is an act of emancipation. In (...)
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  41. Book Review: The Enigma of Clarence Thomas, by Corey Robin. [REVIEW]Brandon M. Terry - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (1):109-121.
  42. On Liberalism’s Religion.Jean L. Cohen - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):48-67.
  43. Religion and Discrimination: Extending the ‘Disaggregative Approach’.Daniel Sabbagh - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):109-118.
  44. A Recognition-Sensitive Phenomenology of Hate Speech.Suzanne Whitten - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-21.
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  45. Three Cheers for Liberal Modesty.Cécile Laborde - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-17.
  46. Laborde’s Religion.Sune Lægaard - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-12.
  47. Individual Integrity, Freedom of Association and Religious Exemption.Peter Jones - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-15.
  48. Religion and Discrimination: Extending the ‘Disaggregative Approach’.Daniel Sabbagh - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-10.
  49. Categorical Injustice.Ásta Sveinsdóttir - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
  50. Ethical Issues of Insider/Outsider Interviewing: Qualitative Research in Grenada, A Caribbean Island.Rena Kydd-Williams - 2019 - Ethics and Social Welfare 13 (4):424-433.
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