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  1. Another Other: The Foreigner.Gabriel Furmuzachi - manuscript
  2. Religious Melancholia.Rajinder Bali - unknown - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 16.
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  3. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva.Emma Borg - forthcoming - Hypatia.
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  4. Kelly Oliver, Reading Kristeva.M. De Gaynesford - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  5. Julia C. Spring Works for The.Lawrence Diller & Rebecca Dresser - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  6. Julia Kristeva, The Sense and Non-Sense of Revolt: The Powers and Limits of Psychoanalysis; Dominique Lecourt, The Mediocracy: French Philosophy Since the Mid-1970s.D. Macey - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  7. Figural Space: Semiotics and the Aesthetic Imaginary.William D. Melaney - 2021 - London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is concerned with the continuing viability of both Freud and Hegel to the reading of modern literature. The book begins with Julia Kristeva’s attempts to relate Hegelian thought to a psychoanalytically informed conception of semiotics that was first explored in her influential study, The Revolution of Poetic Language, and then modified in later books that develop semiotics in new directions. Kristeva’s agreements and disagreement with Hegel are important to the book’s argument, which ultimately defends Hegel against familiar, poststructuralist (...)
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  8. Suspension of a Conflict in a Darkened Son.Chandler D. Rogers - 2020 - Diakrisis 3: 19-37.
    Antithetical desires displayed throughout Kierkegaard’s authorship indicate the disjunctive assumption that the individual exists either in a state of increasing autonomy, expressed negatively as striving for freedom from divine constraint, or in a state of self-annihilating submission, expressed positively in terms of kenotic unification. Proximity to the divine thereby entails forfeiture of individuality, contrary to the explicit aim of Kierkegaard’s authorial project, and aversion to materiality. This essay enunciates the conflict (I), traces the crescendo of loss that births the pseudonymous (...)
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  9. Killing in the Name of Care.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Levinas Studies 12:141-164.
    On 26 July 2016, Satoshi Uematsu murdered 19 and injured 26 at a caregiving facility in Sagamihara, Japan, making it the country’s worst mass killing since WWII. In this article, I offer an analysis of the Sagamihara 19 massacre. I draw on the work of Julia Kristeva and Emmanuel Levinas to argue that claims about disability experience are insufficient to justify normative projects. In short, disability is normatively ambiguous.
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  10. "Patient Interpretation: Kristeva's Model for the Caregiver".Melinda C. Hall - 2017 - In Sarah Hansen & Rebecca Tuvel (eds.), New Forms of Revolt: Essays on Kristeva's Intimate Politics. Albany, New York: SUNY Press. pp. 107-125.
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  11. Alterity and Criticism: Tracing TIme in Modern Literature.William D. Melaney - 2017 - London: Rowman and Littlefield.
    How does the theme of the other–-as person, experience or alternative conceptual scheme—allow us to reassess the role of the self in literary texts? This book employs phenomenology and semiotics to argue that modern literature is strongly concerned with the role of time in the construction of the self. Romantic poetry from Goethe to Shelley and the modern prose tradition from Flaubert to Butor constitute different traditions but also indicate, on a textual basis, how alterity performs a crucial role in (...)
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  12. Review of Julia Kristeva's This Incredible Need to Believe. [REVIEW]Chatterjee Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2017 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 122 (10):720-21.
    This reviewer had read Kristeva in October, 2016 in this Journal (and the review is freely available online and had garnered some small publicity). Over the last one year this reviewer has taken a very short view of her tautological work. Having read her carefully this reviewer has decided that she should be rejected as a psychoanalyst, notwithstanding her huge popularity as a feminist. But this reviewer through a nuanced critique of theoretical psychoanalysis find her and her ilk lacking caritas.
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  13. Book Review: Rousseau Among the Moderns: Music, Aesthetics, Politics, by Julia SimonRousseau Among the Moderns: Music, Aesthetics, Politics, by SimonJulia. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2013, X + 240 Pp. [REVIEW]Alexandra Cook - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (3):437-442.
  14. Disability as Abject: Kristeva, Disability, and Resistance.Josh Dohmen - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):762-778.
    In this essay, I develop an account of disability exclusion that, though inspired by Julia Kristeva, diverges from her account in several important ways. I first offer a brief interpretation of Kristeva's essays “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and … Vulnerability” and “A Tragedy and a Dream: Disability Revisited” and, using this interpretation, I assess certain criticisms of Kristeva's position made by Jan Grue in his “Rhetorics of Difference: Julia Kristeva and Disability.” I then argue that Kristeva's concept of abjection, especially as (...)
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  15. Ugly, Creepy, Disgusting, and Other Modes of Abjection.Jela Krečič & Slavoj Žižek - 2016 - Critical Inquiry 43 (1):60-83.
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  16. Psychoanaliza życia, czyli Gaston Bachelard czyta Pieśni Maldorora.Marta Ples-Bęben - 2016 - Diametros 49:84-102.
    In 1939 Gaston Bachelard published a book Lautréamont on the poem The Songs of Maldoror by Isidore Ducasse. Bachelard’s Lautréamont was inspired by the method of psychoanalysis. The purpose of this article is to analyze Bachelard’s interpretation of the Chants, to compare his version of psychoanalysis with the versions of Freud and Jung, and to show its meaning in the historical and philosophical context.
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  17. The Return of Mythic Voice in the Aporias of Narcissism: Pleshette DeArmitt’s Ethical Idea.Sara Beardsworth - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):14-27.
    The ordeal of mourning, being so much harder than any thought its experience may deliver, bears out the impression developed in Julia Kristeva’s opening to The Severed Head —that thought is swift. She has recognized as well as anyone the interplay of blindness and insight. Nothing brings all this into starker evidence than the premature death of a loved other, a friend, or a true assistant in life and thought. There is a reminder in this that the new narratives of (...)
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  18. The Severed Head: Capital Visions.Marja Härmänmaa - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (4):416-417.
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  19. From Narcissus to Genius Through the Work of Pleshette DeArmitt.Marygrace Hemme - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):59-66.
    Through my reading of the section of Pleshette Dearmitt’s book The Right to Narcissism, entitled “Kristeva: the Rebirth of Narcissus,” I illustrate the way in which DeArmitt’s reading of Narcissus is reflected in Julia Kristeva’s conception of genius. DeArmitt describes narcissism as a structure through which subjectivity, language, self-love, and love for the other come about. Narcissism develops through a metaphorical relation of identification with a “loving third” in which the subject-in-formation is transferred to the site of the other, to (...)
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  20. The Significance of Narcissism.Claire Elise Katz - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):50-58.
    This essay briefly reviews the significance of Pleshette DeArmitt's book, The Right to Narcissism. The essay, originally presented at the 2015 Kristeva Circle, was part of a panel celebrating the work of Pleshette.
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  21. Eating Well with Pleshette DeArmitt.Sarah Kathryn Marshall - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):45-49.
    Written from a student’s perspective, this essay focuses on Pleshette’s engagement with Derrida in The Right to Narcissism: The Case for an Im-possible Self-Love and attests to the manner in which she lived this influence through her teaching and writing.
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  22. Echoes of Beauty: In Memory of Pleshette DeArmitt.Elaine P. Miller - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):67-75.
    There is a special poignancy to the fact that Pleshette DeArmitt's essay "Sarah Kofman's Art of Affirmation" foregrounds Freud's essay "On Transience," in which he muses on the fact that beauty seems to be inextricably linked to a fleeting existence. As DeArmitt writes, "beauty, even in full flowering, foreshadows its own demise, causing what Freud describes as 'a foretaste of mourning.'" Such a transience, in Freud's mind, increases rather than decreases the worth of all that is beautiful. In her essay, (...)
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  23. Psychoanalysis and Deconstruction, A Love Story.Kelly Oliver - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):35-44.
    In The Right to Narcissism: A Case for Im-Possible Self-Love, Pleshette DeArmitt opens the space for an alternative to origin story so popular with political philosophers, namely, the social contract, which assumes a rational and self-identical subject. She does this obliquely by deconstructing narcissism as love of the self-same, or, love of what Kristeva might call “the clean and proper self.” Like Echo interrupting Narcissus’s soliloquy of deadly self-absorbed pleasure and his solitary auto-affection upon seeing his own reflection, Pleshette interrupts (...)
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  24. Reading Kristeva Through the Lens of Edusemiotics: Implications for Education.Inna Semetsky - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (10):1069-1081.
    There are two focal points to this article. One is to address Julia Kristeva’s theoretical corpus in the context of philosophy of education. Kristeva’s notion of subject in process problematises education with its habitual emphasis on ‘product’. Another is to consider her impact from the perspective of edusemiotics. Edusemiotics is a new direction in educational philosophy and theory, and Kristeva represents one contemporary French intellectual who implicitly inspired the creation, research and development of edusemiotics. The article will briefly address the (...)
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  25. A Revolt Against Intermediary Bodies.Nadia Urbinati - 2015 - Constellations 22 (4):477-486.
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  26. Narcissism and Abject Aesthetics.Florentina C. Andreescu & Michael J. Shapiro - 2014 - Journal for Cultural Research 18 (1):44-59.
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  27. Lyotard and the 'Figural' in Performance, Art and Writing.Kiff Bamford - 2014 - London, UK: Continuum.
    This original study offers a timely reconsideration of the work of French philosopher Jean-François Lyotard in relation to art, performance and writing. How can we write about art, whilst acknowledging the transformation that inevitably accompanies translations of both media and temporality? That is the question that persistently dogs Lyotard's own writings on art, and to which this book responds through reference to artists from the recently-formed canon of performance art history, including the myths of seminal figures Marina Abramovic and Vito (...)
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  28. Martyrdom Redefined: Self-Destructive Killers and Vulnerable Narcissism.Leonardo Bobadilla - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):364-365.
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  29. “When China Meets China”: Sinéad Morrissey’s Figurations of the Orient, or the Function of Alterity in Julia Kristeva and Paul Ricoeur.Grzegorz Czemiel - 2014 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 4 (4):116-131.
    This article attempts to investigate the potential resonances between Paul Ricoeur’s and Julia Kristeva’s theories of otherness as applied to the study of poetry by the Northern-Irish poet Sinéad Morrissey. In all of her five poetry books she explores various forms of otherness and attempts to sketch them in verse. She confronts alterity in many ways, approaching such subjects as the relationship with the body and children, encounters with foreigners, and coming to terms with what is foreign within us. This (...)
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  30. Abjection and Sexually Specific Violence in Doris Lessing’s The Cleft.Dorota Filipczak - 2014 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 4 (4):161-172.
    The article applies selected concepts from the writings of Julia Kristeva to the analysis of a novel by Doris Lessing entitled The Cleft. Published in 2007, The Cleft depicts the origin of sexual difference in the human species. Its emergence is fraught with anxiety and sexually specific violence, and invites comparison with the primal separation from the mother and the emancipation of the subject in process at the cost of relegating the maternal to the abject in the writings of Julia (...)
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  31. Kristeva, Ethics and Intellectual Practice.Sylvie Gambaudo - 2014 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 4 (4):145-160.
    The aim of this article is to revisit the work of the French philosopher Julia Kristeva and ask what place we might give her conceptual framework today. I will focus on one key aspect of Kristeva’s work, sexual difference, as that which ties most, if not all, aspects of Kristeva’s work. I am hoping to present a concise, yet wide-ranging view on Kristeva’s critical contribution to the fields of politics and ethics. My objective will be threefold. First, I will present (...)
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  32. The Severed Head: Capital Visions.Jody Gladding (ed.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Informed by a provocative exhibition at the Louvre curated by the author, _The Severed Head_ unpacks artistic representations of severed heads from the Paleolithic period to the present. Surveying paintings, sculptures, and drawings, Julia Kristeva turns her famed critical eye to a study of the head as symbol and metaphor, as religious object and physical fact, further developing a critical theme in her work-- _the power of horror_--and the potential for the face to provide an experience of the sacred. Kristeva (...)
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  33. Pedagogies of Revolt, Politics of the Self.Sarah K. Hansen - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):56-61.
    In "New Forms of Revolt," Julia Kristeva maintains that intimate revolt is a necessary, if imperiled, mode of contemporary resistance. This essay reflects on the pedagogical dimensions of intimate revolt and its fate in university contexts, especially in the United States. I argue that a Kristevan pedagogical revolt involves upheavals of thought supported by loving listening relationships.
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  34. Taking Sides on Severed Heads: Kristeva at the Louvre.Alison Jasper - 2014 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 4 (4):173-183.
    The theorist and philosopher Julia Kristeva is invited to curate an exhibition at the Louvre in Paris as part of a series-Parti Pris - and to turn this into a book, The Severed Head: Capital Visions. The organiser, Régis Michel, wants something partisan, that will challenge people to think, and Kristeva delivers in response a collection of severed heads neatly summarising her critique of the whole of western culture! Three figures dominate, providing a key to making sense of the exhibition: (...)
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  35. Spartakus: The Symbology of Revolt.Furio Jesi & Andrea Cavaletti - 2014 - Seagull Books.
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  36. New Forms of Revolt.Julia Kristeva - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):1-19.
    Popular uprisings, indignant youth, toppled dictators, oligarchic presidents dismissed, hopes dashed, liberties crushed in prisons, fixed trials, and bloodbaths. How are we to read these images? Could revolt, or what is called “riot” on the Web, be waking humanity from its dream of hyperconnectedness? Or could it just be a trick played on us so that the culture of spectacle can last longer? But what “revolt” are we talking about? Is it even possible?
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  37. Inner Experience and Worldly Revolt: Arendt’s Bearings on Kristeva’s Project.Noëlle McAfee - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):26-35.
    What is at stake when political revolt depends upon radical inner experience? Is the only route to cultural and political change, as Kristeva seems to argue, through personal introspection and revolt? If we want more from life than the freedom to channel surf, as she says, need the direction of inquiry be primarily inward? Need there be an either/or of psychical versus public life? Is the only answer to social and political dead ends really found by turning inward? Is the (...)
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  38. Investing in a Third: Colonization, Religious Fundamentalism, and Adolescence.Elaine P. Miller - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):36-45.
    In her keynote address to the Kristeva Circle 2014, Julia Kristeva argued that European Humanism dating from the French Revolution paradoxically paved the way for “those who use God for political ends” by promoting a completely and solely secular path to the political. As an unintended result of this movement this path has led, in the late 20 th and early 21 st centuries, to the development of a new form of nihilism that masks itself as revolutionary but in fact (...)
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  39. Head Cases: Julia Kristeva on Philosophy and Art in Depressed Times.Elaine P. Miller - 2014 - Columbia University Press.
    Focusing on specific artworks that illustrate KristevaÕs ideas, from ancient Greek tragedy to early photography, contemporary installation art, and film, Miller positions creative acts as a form of Òspiritual inoculationÓ against the ...
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  40. Motherhood and the Machine.Miglena Nikolchina - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):62-69.
    In her conceptualization of the human as defined by the capacity for revolt Kristeva unavoidably touches upon issues of robotization, technology, and the virtual. The concepts of animal and machine, however, although they do appear occasionally and in important ways, are never at the focus of her inquiries and are absent in her “New Forms of Revolt.” Yet these two concepts to a large extent define the field of contemporary philosophical debates of the human giving rise to three major theoretical (...)
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  41. Kristeva's Reformation.Kelly Oliver - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):20-25.
    In my brief remarks, I consider what it means to return and rebind—that is to say, the significance of the re for Kristeva’s thought. Kristeva does not just talk about binding or birth, or unbinding or death, but rather rebinding and rebirth, suggesting that it is a retrospective return rather than an original moment that is crucial. The most significant moment, then, is not the moment of imaginary plenitude, nor the moment of originary loss, but rather the moment of rebirth (...)
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  42. The Unblest Room: Kristeva’s Chora in Sophocles’s Antigone.Beccie Puneet Randhawa - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (2):293-313.
  43. Kristeva: The Individual, the Symbolic and Feminist Readings of the Biblical Text.Joshua Roe - 2014 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 4 (4):132-144.
    The aim of this study is to develop from Kristeva’s account of time and semiotics the conditions of possibility for a new approach to interpreting the Bible. This will be set against the background of feminist biblical criticism, beginning from Esther Fuchs’s assessment of deception. She bases her comparison on the concept of deceptiveness but I will argue, using Lacan, that the aporia of desire undermines this comparison. Through Kristeva’s framework of the phases of feminism it will be shown that (...)
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  44. Teresa My Love: An Imagined Life of the Saint of Avila.Lorna Scott Fox (ed.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Mixing fiction, history, psychoanalysis, and personal fantasy, Teresa, My Love turns a past world into a modern marvel, following Sylvia Leclercq, a French psychoanalyst, academic, and incurable insomniac, as she falls for the sixteenth-century Saint Teresa of Avila and becomes consumed with charting her life. Traveling to Spain, Leclercq, Julia Kristeva's probing alter ego, visits the sites and embodiments of the famous mystic and awakens to her own desire for faith, connection, and rebellion. One of Kristeva's most passionate and transporting (...)
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  45. Understanding Through Fiction: A Selection From Teresa, My Love: An Imagined Life of the Saint of Avila.Lorna Scott Fox (ed.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Born in 1515, Teresa of Avila survived the Spanish Inquisition and was a key reformer of the Carmelite Order. Her experience of ecstasy, which she intimately described in her writings, released her from her body and led to a complete realization of her consciousness, a state Julia Kristeva explores as it was expressed in Teresa's writing. Incorporating notes from her own psychoanalytic practice, as well as literary and philosophical references, Kristeva builds a fascinating dual diagnosis of contemporary society and the (...)
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  46. Timely Revolutions: On the Timelessness of the Unconscious.Fanny Söderbäck - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):46-55.
    Julia Kristeva’s work on the concept of revolt is marked by a temporal analysis that takes revolt to be a movement of return into the past that makes possible change, rebirth, and an open future. Such temporal revolt is, according to Kristeva, intimate, in that it touches on unconscious psychic structures and operates on the level of thought and creativity. But Kristeva simultaneously inherits Freud’s notion that the unconscious is timeless. How, I ask, can revolt be defined as a temporal (...)
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  47. Spartakus: The Symbology of Revolt.Alberto Toscano (ed.) - 2014 - Seagull Books.
    On December 29, 1918, the Spartakus League, a Marxist revolutionary movement, rose up in Germany calling for an end to class rule by the bourgeoisie. Massive demonstrations followed and more than 500,000 Berliners took to the streets in January—only to be crushed by police and anticommunist paramilitary troops. Several leaders of the League were killed and the revolt was quashed. Through a detailed reconstruction of the events of that bloody winter, historian and critic Furio Jesi recasts our understanding of a (...)
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  48. Keeping It Intimate: A Meditation on the Power of Horror.Sara Beardsworth - 2013 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):127-131.
    The paper is a reading of Julia Kristeva, The Severed Head . It first interprets a dual historical element in Kristeva's text on "capital visions," her selection of exemplars of the artistic representation of severed heads. On the one hand, there are the aesthetic trajectories themselves, from skull art to artistic modernism. On the other hand, there is an implicit history of "horror" in psychoanalysis in this text, going from Freud through Lacan to Kristeva. The paper then indicates the tone (...)
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  49. Kristeva's Thérèse: Mysticism and Modernism.Carol Mastrangelo Bové - 2013 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):105-115.
    This essay focuses on Julia Kristeva’s recent volume Thérèse mon amour: Sainte Thérèse d’Avila (2008) , describing and placing this blend of novel, play, psychoanalytic cultural theory, and case history in the context of her work. I argue that the volume contributes to an understanding of religion’s impact—especially Catholic mysticism--on Western categories of women. I address in particular Thérèse ’s mysticism and modernist use of a feminine figure to subvert practices threatening the vitality of the psyche and of social relations. (...)
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  50. Julia Kristeva’s The Severed Head.Pleshette DeArmitt - 2013 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):116-119.
    This paper was presented as part of a roundtable on Kristeva’s The Severed Head at the inaugural meeting of the Kristeva Circle on October 13, 2012.
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