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  1. Presidential Accountability in Wartime: President Bush, the Treatment of Detainees, and the Laws of War by Stuart Streichler.Steven D. Roper - forthcoming - Human Rights Review:1-3.
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  2. Political Gay Science: Nietzsche, Conservatism, and Nonbinary Identity.Alexander Sieber - 2024 - Gender Issues 41 (2).
    Why has modern American conservatism committed itself to gender binaries? Examining why this new categorizing unsettles conservatives (and how they have reacted against teacher unions and transgender influencers), this paper turns to Nietzschean analysis. It finds that the unsettling of heteronormative gender norms resulted in a pivot by conservatism to perpetuate a new gender identity politics in which nonbinary and especially transgender people are scapegoated. Imagining a nihilistic interpretation of gender, conservatives have made “transgender” a signifier of amorality and barbarism, (...)
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  3. Human rights and relativism.Bernard Williams - 2005 - In . pp. 62-74.
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  4. Human Rights and Tobacco Control.Marie Gispen (ed.) - 2020 - Edward Elgar Publishing.
    Large-scale adverse health and developmental outcomes related to tobacco affect millions of people across the world, raising serious questions from a human rights perspective. In response to this crisis, this timely book provides a comprehensive analysis of the promotion and enforcement of human rights protection in tobacco control law and policy at international, regional, and domestic levels.This thought-provoking book offers significant new insights to the topic, laying the foundations for a human rights based approach to tobacco control. Addressing the function (...)
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  5. The Non-Coherence Theory of Digital Human Rights.Mart Susi - 2024 - Cambridge University Press.
    Susi offers a novel non-coherence theory of digital human rights to explain the change in meaning and scope of human rights rules, principles, ideas and concepts, and the interrelationships and related actors, when moving from the physical domain into the online domain. The transposition into the digital reality can alter the meaning of well-established offline human rights to a wider or narrower extent, impacting core concepts such as transparency, legal certainty and foreseeability. Susi analyses the 'loss in transposition' of some (...)
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  6. Dogs and Monsters: Observations on the Evacuation of Afghanistan and the Intersection of Human Rights and the Anthropocene.K. M. Ferebee - 2023 - Intertexts 27 (2):52-77.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Dogs and MonstersObservations on the Evacuation of Afghanistan and the Intersection of Human Rights and the AnthropoceneK. M. Ferebee (bio)On August 28, 2021, former Royal Marine and charity worker Pen Farthing was evacuated from Afghanistan with almost two hundred dogs and cats that his Kabul animal charity, Nowzad Dogs, had rescued. The role of the British government in this evacuation remains hotly contested: At the time, the British Ministry (...)
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  7. Human Rights and Transitional Justice in the Maldives: Closing the Door, Once and For All?Renée Jeffery - forthcoming - Human Rights Review:1-24.
    In 2020, the Maldives instituted a transitional justice process to address decades of systematic human rights abuses including the widespread use of arbitrary arrest and detention, torture, and the forced depopulation of entire island communities. While the country’s decision to confront its violent past is not unusual, the institution it has established to undertake that task is. Rather than institute a truth and reconciliation commission (TRC), refer cases to its Human Rights Commission, or undertake criminal trials in its domestic judicial (...)
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  8. Fourth Generation Human Rights in View of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.Manuel Jesús López Baroni - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (2):39.
    We are at the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, characterised by the interaction of so-called disruptive technologies (biotechnology, synthetic biology, nanotechnology, neurotechnology and artificial intelligence). We believe that the challenges posed by technoscience cannot be met by the three generations of human rights that already exist. The need to create a fourth generation of human rights is, therefore, explored in this article. For that purpose, the state of the art will be analysed from a scientific and ethical perspective. We (...)
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  9. Proving Domestic Violence as Gender Structural Discrimination before the European Court of Human Rights.Katarzyna Sękowska-Kozłowska - forthcoming - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-13.
    Since Opuz v. Turkey (2009), the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) delivered over a dozen judgments in which it examined domestic violence through the prism of gender-based discrimination. Apart from the individual circumstances of the cases, the Court considered the general approach to domestic violence in the defendant states, searching for a large-scale structural gender bias. Hence, although the Court has not directly referred to the notion of “structural discrimination” in relation to domestic violence, it engaged in unveiling this (...)
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  10. The Basic Obligation to Not Destroy Heritage.Quince Pan - 2024 - Dissertation, King's College London
    Why is destroying heritage pro tanto wrong? Why does heritage destruction require justification, unlike the destruction of rubbish? The property rights view answers: heritage belongs to people, communities and cultures. The reverence view answers: we are obliged to respect things with non-instrumental value. The moral rights view answers: our predecessors, contemporaries and successors have rights to have their cherishings respected and cultural and epistemic goods protected. The moral harm view answers: destroying heritage causes morally significant harm. I argue that these (...)
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  11. Human Rights, Interpretivism, and the Semantic Sting.Gabriel Costa Val Rodrigues - 2024 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 37 (1):1-29.
    What are human rights? What makes a particular human rights claim ‘genuine’ or ‘valid’? These are difficult questions with which current philosophical literature on human rights is concerned. They are also the same kind of questions that legal philosophers asked about Law throughout the 20th century. Drawing from the similarities between the two fields, I attempt to do with the concept of human rights something similar to what Ronald Dworkin accomplished with that of Law in Law’s Empire. First, I offer (...)
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  12. Human Rights Violations Committed Against Human Rights Defenders Through the Use of Legal System: A Trend in Europe and Beyond.Aikaterini-Christina Koula - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):99-122.
    Human rights defenders (HRDs) fight for various human rights and address concerns related to corruption, employment, the environment, and other issues. They also challenge powerful state and private stakeholders and seek justice for human rights abuses. Therefore, HRDs are increasingly becoming targets of violent attacks and abuse with the aim of silencing them. This article begins by providing a brief definition of HRDs and then proceeds to outline the risks associated with their work in defending human rights. It also identifies (...)
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  13. The Significance of Sami Rights: Law, Justice, and Sustainability for the Indigenous Sami in the Nordic Countries by Dorothee Cambou and Oyvind Ravna, eds.Lavinia Stan - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):123-125.
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  14. Islam, Constitutional Law and Human Rights. Sexual Minorities and Freethinkers in Egypt and Tunisia, by Tommaso Virgili.Jaume Saura - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):127-129.
  15. The Principle of a Trial Within a Reasonable Time and JustTech: Benefits and Risks.Daniel Brantes Ferreira, Elizaveta Gromova & Elena V. Titova - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):47-66.
    The article addresses the pervasive global challenge of delayed justice, emphasizing its role as a catalyst for widespread judicial reforms. The study defines international and national court approaches to reasonable trial durations by employing systematic and comparative legal methods. It delves into essential technology courts and parties use to ensure timely proceedings, categorizing associated risks and problems. The authors advocate for the multi-door courthouse system, illustrating its efficacy in reducing delays. Furthermore, the article classifies technologies facilitating reasonable trial durations, acknowledging (...)
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  16. Academic Bullying and Human Rights: Is It Time to Take Them Seriously?Dora Kostakopoulou & Morteza Mahmoudi - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):25-46.
    Notwithstanding universities’ many laudable aims, incidents of serious bullying, academic harassment and sexual harassment in academic settings are reported with increasing regularity globally. However, the human rights violations involved in bullying and academic harassment have not received attention by the literature. In this article, we pierce the veil of silence surrounding university environments and provide a systematic account of the breaches of international and European human rights law involved in academic bullying and harassment. By adopting a socio-legal lens, we shed (...)
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  17. The Resurgence of Enforced Disappearances in the Aftermath of the July 15, 2016 Failed Coup Attempt in Turkey: A Systematic Analysis of Human Rights Violations. [REVIEW]Köksal Avincan - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):67-98.
    After the failed coup attempt on July 15, 2016, Turkey rapidly adjusted its national security strategies to align with the principles of a security state, resulting in a notable increase in human rights violations during the declared State of Emergency. Enforced disappearances, previously used by the State against Kurdish dissidents in the 1990s, resurfaced as a brutal method in the name of “State survival” following the failed coup attempt. This research examined the systematic and organized nature of these enforced disappearances, (...)
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  18. The Efficiency of Intersectionality: Labelling the Benefits of a Rights-Based Approach to Interpret Sexual and Gender-Based Crimes.Ana Martin - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):1-24.
    International criminal law (ICL) has traditionally overlooked sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and struggles to understand it. Prosecutions have been largely inefficient and not reflective of gender harms. The Rome Statute requires interpreting SGBV as a social construction (article 7(3)), in consistency with international human rights law (IHRL) and without discrimination (article 21(3)). There is, however, little guidance to implement these approaches. This article argues that intersectionality, an IHRL-based approach that reveals compounded discrimination, is an efficient tool to interpret SGBV (...)
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  19. Rancière, human rights, and the limits of politics of process.Tom Frost - 2016 - In Mónica López Lerma & Julen Etxabe (eds.), Ranciere and Law. Routledge.
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  20. Integrating Mental Privacy within Data Protection Laws: Addressing the Complexities of Neurotechnology and the Interdependence of Human Rights.Nadine Liv & Dov Greenbaum - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):151-153.
    Susser and Cabrera (2024) assess the role of bespoke neuro-privacy regulations including the creation of a novel right to mental privacy. They argue that focusing on what distinguishes mental priva...
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  21. Beyond Substance: Structural and Political Questions for Neurotechnologies and Human Rights.Walter G. Johnson - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):134-136.
    The last several years have seen vibrant debates among policymakers and scholars on whether to craft new human rights (or novel interpretations of existing ones) around neurotechnologies. These con...
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  22. What an International Declaration on Neurotechnologies and Human Rights Could Look like: Ideas, Suggestions, Desiderata.Jan Christoph Bublitz - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):96-112.
    International institutions such as UNESCO are deliberating on a new standard setting instrument for neurotechnologies. This will likely lead to the adoption of a soft law document which will be the first global document specifically tailored to neurotechnologies, setting the tone for further international or domestic regulations. While some stakeholders have been consulted, these developments have so far evaded the broader attention of the neuroscience, neurotech, and neuroethics communities. To initiate a broader debate, this target article puts to discussion twenty-five (...)
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  23. Algorithmic injustice and human rights.Denis Coitinho & André Luiz Olivier da Silva - 2024 - Filosofia Unisinos 25 (1):1-17.
    The central goal of this paper is to investigate the injustices that can occur with the use of new technologies, especially Artificial Intelligence (AI), focusing on the issues concerning respect to human rights and the protection of victims and the most vulnerable. We aim to study the impacts of AI in daily life and the possible threats to human dignity imposed by it, such as discrimination based on prejudices, identity-oriented stereotypes, and unequal access to health services. We characterize such cases (...)
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  24. Mind and rights: the history, ethics, law and psychology of human rights.Matthias Mahlmann - 2023 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    Mind and Rights combines historical, philosophical, and legal perspectives with research from psychology and the cognitive sciences to probe the justification of human rights in ethics, politics and law. Chapters critically examine the growth of the human rights culture, its roots in history and current human rights theories. They engage with the so-called cognitive revolution and investigate the relationship between human cognition and human rights to determine how insights gained from modern theories of the mind can deepen our understanding of (...)
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  25. The logic of human rights: from subject/object dichotomy to topo-logic.Ekaterina Yahyaoui Krivenko - 2023 - Northampton, MA, USA: EE | Edward Elgar Publishing.
    Conceptualizing the nature of reality and the way the world functions, Ekaterina Yahyaoui Krivenko analyzes the foundations of human rights law in the strict subject/object dichotomy. Seeking to dismantle this dichotomy using topo-logic, a concept developed by Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitaro, this topical book formulates ways to operationalize alternative visions of human rights practice. Subject/object dichotomy, Yahyaoui Krivenko demonstrates, emerges from and reflects a particular Western worldview through a quest for rationality and formal logic. Taking a metaphysical and epistemological perspective, (...)
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  26. Development and Human Rights in Africa: A Theoretical Proposal.Martin Ajei - 2023 - In Uchenna B. Okeja (ed.), Routledge Handbook of African Political Philosophy. Routledge.
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  27. Human Rights: Moral or Political?Jesse Tomalty - 2024 - Philosophical Quarterly 74 (2):701-703.
    This volume makes a welcome contribution to the burgeoning philosophical scholarship on human rights by foregrounding methodological and meta-philosophical issu.
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  28. The right of self-defense and the organic unity of human rights.David Little - 2024 - In Sumner B. Twiss, Bingxiang Luo & Benedict S. B. Chan (eds.), Warfare ethics in comparative perspective: China and the West. New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
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  29. Horton Hears a Who and International Human Rights Law.John Hursh - 2024 - In Montgomery McFate (ed.), Dr. Seuss and the art of war: secret military lessons. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
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  30. Heritable Genome Editing and International Human Rights.Kevin Doxzen & Jodi Halpern - 2024 - In Neal Baer (ed.), The promise and peril of CRISPR. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  31. The realisation of human rights in mental health law : Larry Gostin's 'the ideology of entitlement : the application of contemporary legal approaches to psychiatry'.Judy Laing - 2023 - In Sara Fovargue & Craig Purshouse (eds.), Leading works in health law and ethics. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  32. Sustainable development and human rights in safeguarding ICH under the 2003 Convention : positive goals or an internal contradiction?Janet Blake - 2024 - In Chiara Bortolotto & Ahmed Skounti (eds.), Intangible cultural heritage and sustainable development: inside a UNESCO Convention. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  33. Human rights in the natural law tradition.Jonathan Crowe - 2024 - In James Dominic Rooney & Patrick Zoll (eds.), Beyond Classical Liberalism: Freedom and the Good. New York, NY: Routledge Chapman & Hall.
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  34. Yuval Harari on Human Rights and Biology.Nick Zangwill - 2024 - Think 23 (67):59-63.
    Yuval Harari believes that humans make myths, and that these can be powerful engines for social change. One of these myths, claims Harari, is the existence of ‘liberal rights’. This article challenges that claim and defends the idea of grounding rights in human nature.
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  35. Ubuntu as a Moral Theory and Human Rights in South Africa (repr.).Thaddeus Metz - 2024 - In David Bilchitz, Thaddeus Metz & Oritsegbubemi Anthony Oyowe (eds.), Jurisprudence in an African Context, 2nd edn. Oxford University Press. pp. 361-363.
    An abridged version of an article published in 2011 focusing on its discussion of the ubuntu ethics of land reform.
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  36. Business interest in human rights regulation: shaping actors’ duties and rights.Doris Fuchs & Benedikt Lennartz - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (3):339-362.
    Business actors create and operate in global production networks that bring them in contact with regulatory frameworks across multiple levels and domains. Importantly, they also participate in shaping those regulatory frameworks. But what are the specific interests they pursue in their involvement in regulation? Traditionally, scholars tended to assume that the focus of business actors is primarily on avoiding (stringent) public regulation. Recent developments have highlighted a broader range of business interests, however. Accordingly, this paper investigates business positions on the (...)
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  37. Living alone under lockdown.Felix Pinkert - 2021 - In Fay Niker & Aveek Bhattacharya (eds.), Political Philosophy in a Pandemic: Routes to a More Just World. London, New York: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 123-135.
  38. From Text to Meaning: Unpacking the Semiotics of Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights.Giorgia Baldi - forthcoming - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-24.
    Through an analysis of the European Court of Human Rights’ decisions concerning the practice of veiling, this article problematises the semiotics-architectural structure of article 9 of the European Convention of Human Rights (Freedom of thought, conscience and religion), questioning which representation of the human and the female subject is recognised and therefore protected by secular/liberal and Human Rights law. It argues that the semiotics-architectural structure of article 9, which is based on the distinction between faith and its manifestation, not only (...)
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  39. Human Rights and Rights of War – Hobbes’ De Cive and De Homine.이준호 ) - 2018 - Modern Philosophy 12:5-33.
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  40. Derk Pereboom, Wrongdoing & the Human Emotions. New York: Oxford University Press. 224pp. ISBN: 978-0198903789. US $25.00 (Pbk). [REVIEW]Stephen Kershnar - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry.
    Derk Pereboom’s book, Wrongdoing & the Human Emotions, addresses how we ought to respond to wrongdoing given the lack of basic-desert moral responsibility, falsity of retributivism, and the metaphysical and moral problems with moral anger. The book is outstanding. Pereboom’s arguments are important, interesting, powerful, and very well-written. Despite this, his specific arguments fail because basic-desert responsibility-skepticism makes non-consequentialism is false.
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  41. Human Rights and Women's Rights.Angela Knobel - 2023 - Nova et Vetera 21 (1):275-285.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Human Rights and Women's RightsAngela KnobelMainstream feminists insist, with a degree of unanimity that is sometimes surprising, that access to abortion is an essential precondition of female equality. That feminism, which is in other respects so flexible, inclusive, and uncategorizable, should be so unyielding with respect to this particular issue seems surprising to many. It is especially surprising to those who, while sympathetic to other feminist goals, also oppose (...)
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  42. Global Health Impact: Human rights, access to medicines, and measurement.Nicole Hassoun - 2024 - Developing World Bioethics 24 (1):37-48.
    Should people have a legal human right to health? And, if so, what exactly does protecting this right require? This essay defends some answers to these questions recently articulated in Global Health Impact. It explains how these answers depend on a particular way of thinking about health and the minimally good life, how quality of life matters at and over time, what various agents should do to help people who are unable to live well enough, and many other things. Moreover, (...)
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  43. Legal and Ethical Dimensions in Addressing Human Rights in the Design and Implementation of Artificial Intelligence.Nikolaos Voudouris, Charalampos Patrikakis, Vasilka Sancin & Sorin Adam Matei - 2024 - In Mina Farmanbar, Maria Tzamtzi, Ajit Kumar Verma & Antorweep Chakravorty (eds.), Frontiers of Artificial Intelligence, Ethics, and Multidisciplinary Applications: 1st International Conference on Frontiers of AI, Ethics, and Multidisciplinary Applications (FAIEMA), Greece, 2023. Springer Nature Singapore. pp. 409-415.
    This doctoral research will address the legal requirements in AI system development, particularly those deriving from international human rights law, together with relevant ethical and technical issues. The aim is to identify their potential cumulative effects on AI design, development, and use and suggest some ideas for further consideration. It will analyze the technical landscape and assess the capacities of systems to conform to the dictations of Human Rights and Ethics and if not, how that might be achieved. This proposal (...)
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  44. Gendering the Pandemic: Women’s Health Disparities From a Human Rights Perspective.JhuCin Rita Jhang & Po-Han Lee - 2023 - Health Care Analysis 32 (1):15-32.
    As COVID-19 keeps impacting the world, its impact is felt differently by people of different sexes and genders. International guidelines and research on gender inequalities and women’s rights during the pandemic have been published. However, data from Taiwan is lacking. This study aims to fill the gap to increase our knowledge regarding this issue and provide policy recommendations. This study is part of a more extensive project in response to the fourth state report concerning the implementation of the Convention on (...)
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  45. Hessler’s New Feminist Approach to Human Rights Theorizing.Eric Scarffe - 2024 - Res Publica 30 (1):183-187.
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  46. Fixing bodies and shaping narratives: Epistemic injustice and the responses of medicine and bioethics to intersex human rights demands.Morgan Carpenter - 2024 - Clinical Ethics 19 (1):3-17.
    Children with innate variations of sex characteristics (also termed differences of sex development or intersex traits) are routinely subjected to medical interventions that aim to make their bodies appear or function more typically female or male. Many such interventions lack clear evidence of benefit, they have been challenged for thirty years, and they are now understood to violate children’s rights to bodily autonomy and bodily integrity. In this paper I argue that these persist in part due to epistemic injustices and (...)
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  47. Addressing Environmental Injustices Requires a Public Health Ethics and/or Human Rights Perspective.Audrey R. Chapman - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):33-34.
    Keisha Ray and Jane Falls Cooper’s article “Bioethics of Environmental Injustice: Ethical, Legal, and Clinical Implications of Unhealthy Environments” seeks to give environmental concerns greater p...
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  48. Sport governing bodies and the prioritization of human rights: a conceptual analysis of the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) dispute with Russia.Hans Erik Næss - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    This article addresses the moral and legal difficulties sport governing bodies encounter as human rights promoters. The case presented here is the 2023 decision by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to allow athletes from Russia and Belarus to compete in international sport under neutral colours, after recommending complete exclusion a year before due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. While IOC’s change of mind was influenced by UN experts on human rights, claiming that the ban discriminated against Russian athletes, the (...)
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  49. A Metaphysics of Dehumanization.Suzy Killmister - 2023 - Philosophers' Imprint 23.
    Most contemporary accounts of dehumanization construe it either as a psychological phenomenon of seeing the other as non-human, or as as an interpersonal phenomenon of failing to treat the other as they are entitled qua moral agent. In this paper I offer an alternative way of thinking about dehumanization. Drawing on recent work in social metaphysics, I argue that we can productively think of the human as a social kind, and correspondingly of dehumanization as a process of excommunication from that (...)
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  50. Economic Statecraft: Human Rights, Sanctions, and Conditionality, by Cécile Fabre.Christian Barry - 2024 - Mind 133 (529):286-294.
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