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  1. How Beauty Matters.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - forthcoming - In Lee B. Brown David Goldblatt (ed.), Aesthetics: A Reader in Philosophy of the Arts. Routledge.
    How do we view, understand and appreciate a complex and challenging work of visual art such as Leon Mostovoy's Transfigure and how, in our encounter with it, does beauty matter? Transfigure Project--a 2013 book, film and photographic installation that is now also an interactive website (http://transfigureproject.com/)--is "a project of corporal self-expression, presented as an experimental, visual feast" by which 'transfigure' means "to transform into something more beautiful or elevated." Photographs of fifty nude trans-identified figures can be playfully arranged in numerous (...)
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  2. Material Girls: Why Reality Matters for Feminism. [REVIEW]Julian Baggini - 2021 - The Philosophers' Magazine 94:111-115.
  3. Escaping the Natural Attitude About Gender.Robin Dembroff - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (3):983-1003.
    Alex Byrne’s article, “Are Women Adult Human Females?”, asks a question that Byrne treats as nearly rhetorical. Byrne’s answer is, ‘clearly, yes’. Moreover, Byrne claims, 'woman' is a biological category that does not admit of any interpretation as (also) a social category. It is important to respond to Byrne’s argument, but mostly because it is paradigmatic of a wider phenomenon. The slogan “women are adult human females” is a political slogan championed by anti-trans activists, appearing on billboards, pamphlets, and anti-trans (...)
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  4. The Trangender Reader: Language, Law, Sport & Reality.Miroslav Imbrisevic - 2021 - In THE TRANSGENDER READER: Language, Law, Sport & Reality. A Collection of Essays. Worthing, UK: pp. 1-64.
    Contents: 1. Testosterone is not the only Game in Town: The Transgender Woman Athlete 2. Queer Language Lessons: The Confusion over ‘My Pronouns’ 3. Legal Fictions: Changing Sex by Changing Gender 4. More than a Feeling: Rock Stars, Heroines and Transwomen 5. To Compete, or not to Compete, that is the Question: Which is Nobler for Transwomen Athletes? 6. The Power of Words 7. Feminism, Conceptual Engineering, and Trans Identit.
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  5. Feminismo e identidades de género en Japón.Montserrat Crespin Perales (ed.) - 2021 - Barcelona, España: Edicions Bellaterra.
    Desde un enfoque multidisciplinar y plural, "Feminismo e identidades de género en Japón" reúne una colección de ensayos que permiten conocer los debates intelectuales del feminismo japonés contemporáneo, así como las vigentes discusiones sobre las identidades de género y las orientaciones sexuales en aquel país. Los temas tratados desvelan, por un lado, la riqueza de la historia y del presente del feminismo en Japón, tanto en la voz de pensadoras y activistas pioneras, como a través del giro colectivo y radical (...)
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  6. Beyond Binary: Genderqueer as Critical Gender Kind.Robin Dembroff - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (9):1-23.
    We want to know what gender is. But metaphysical approaches to this question solely have focused on the binary gender kinds men and women. By overlooking those who identify outside of the binary–the group I call ‘genderqueer’–we are left without tools for understanding these new and quickly growing gender identifications. This metaphysical gap in turn creates a conceptual lacuna that contributes to systematic misunderstanding of genderqueer persons. In this paper, I argue that to better understand genderqueer identities, we must recognize (...)
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  7. Beyond Binary: Genderqueer as Critical Gender Kind [Chinese].Robin Dembroff - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (9):1-23.
    Chinese translation courtesy of Zhuanxu Xu. We want to know what gender is. But metaphysical approaches to this question solely have focused on the binary gender kinds men and women. By overlooking those who identify outside of the binary–the group I call ‘genderqueer’–we are left without tools for understanding these new and quickly growing gender identifications. This metaphysical gap in turn creates a conceptual lacuna that contributes to systematic misunderstanding of genderqueer persons. In this paper, I argue that to better (...)
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  8. Cisgender Commonsense and Philosophy's Transgender Trouble [Chinese].Robin Dembroff - 2020 - TSQ 3 (7).
    Chinese translation by Zhuanxu Xu. Analytic philosophy has transgender trouble. In this paper, I explore potential explanations for this trouble, focusing on the notion of 'cisgender commonsense' and its place in philosophical methodology.
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  9. Why We Shouldn't Compare Transracial to Transgender Identity.Robin Dembroff & Dee Payton - 2020 - Boston Review.
    Unlike gender inequality, racial inequality primarily accumulates across generations. In this article, Dembroff and Payton argue that transracial identification undermines collective reckoning with that injustice.
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  10. Ending Sex-Based Oppression: Transitional Pathways.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2020 - Philosophia 49 (3):1021-1041.
    From a radical feminist perspective, gender is a cage. Or to be more precise, it’s two cages. If genders are cages, then surely we want to let people out. Being less constrained in our choices is something we all have reason to want: theorists in recent years have emphasized the importance of the capability to do and be many different things. At the very least, we should want an end to sex-based oppression. But what does this entail, when it comes (...)
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  11. Real Kinds in Real Time: On Responsible Social Modeling.Theodore Bach - 2019 - The Monist 102 (2):236-258.
    There is broad agreement among social researchers and social ontologists that the project of dividing humans into social kinds should be guided by at least two methodological commitments. First, a commitment to what best serves moral and political interests, and second, a commitment to describing accurately the causal structures of social reality. However, researchers have not sufficiently analyzed how these two commitments interact and constrain one another. In the absence of that analysis, several confusions have set in, threatening to undermine (...)
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  12. Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny, by Kate Manne. [REVIEW]Nora Berenstain - 2019 - Mind 128 (512):1360-1371.
    Kate Manne’s Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny combines traditional conceptual analysis and feminist conceptual engineering with critical exploration of cases drawn from popular culture and current events in order to produce an ameliorative account of misogyny, i.e., one that will help address the problems of misogyny in the actual world. A feminist account of misogyny that is both intersectional and ameliorative must provide theoretical tools for recognizing misogyny in its many-dimensional forms, as it interacts and overlaps with other oppressions. (...)
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  13. Beauvoirian Androgyny: Reflections on the Androgynous World of Fraternité in The Second Sex.Megan M. Burke - 2019 - Feminist Theory 20 (1):3-18.
    This article considers Beauvoir’s gesture towards fraternité at the end of The Second Sex by focusing on her fleeting characterisation of this future as ‘an androgynous world’. Generally, either Beauvoir’s call for fraternité is dismissed as an erasure of sexual difference and is thus seen to be politically bankrupt, or fraternité is understood to realise sexual difference. This latter reading suggests that androgyny plays no role in Beauvoir’s solution to women’s oppression, while the other view often sees it as one (...)
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  14. Against Abolition.Matthew J. Cull - 2019 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 5 (3).
    Analytic metaphysics of gender has taken an ameliorative turn towards ethical and political questions regarding what our concept of gender ought to be, and how gendered society should be structured. Abolitionism about gender, which claims that we ought to mandate gender out of existence, has therefore seen renewed interest. I consider three arguments for abolitionism from radically different perspectives: Haslanger’s simple argument, Escalante’s Gender Nihilism, and Okin’s argument from ideal theory. I argue that none of the above manage to establish (...)
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  15. Reconceptualizing Women for Intersectional Feminism.Youjin Kong - 2019 - Dissertation, Michigan State University
    This dissertation addresses the question of how to reconceptualize “women” in order to do a more intersectional feminism. Intersectionality—the idea that gender, race, class, sexuality, and so on operate not as separate entities but as mutually constructing phenomena—has become a gold standard in contemporary feminist scholarship. In particular, intersectionality has achieved success in showing that the old conception of women as a single, uniform concept marginalizes women and others who exist at the intersecting axes of multiple oppressions (e.g., women of (...)
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  16. Real Talk on the Metaphysics of Gender.Robin Dembroff - 2018 - Philosophical Topics 46 (2):21-50.
    Gender classifications often are controversial. These controversies typically focus on whether gender classifications align with facts about gender kind membership: Could someone really be nonbinary? Is Chris Mosier really a man? I think this is a bad approach. Consider the possibility of ontological oppression, which arises when social kinds operating in a context unjustly constrain the behaviors, concepts, or affect of certain groups. Gender kinds operating in dominant contexts, I argue, oppress trans and nonbinary persons in this way: they marginalize (...)
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  17. Why Be Nonbinary?Robin Dembroff - 2018 - Aeon.
    In this article, Dembroff argues that the category nonbinary should not be understood in terms of presentation or psychological states, but instead in terms of how its members are politically situated with respect to the binary expectations of Western gender ideology.
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  18. Burning It In? Nietzsche, Gender, and Externalized Memory.Marie Draz - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (2).
    In this article, I extend the feminist use of Friedrich Nietzsche’s account of memory and forgetting to consider the contemporary externalization of memory foregrounded by transgender experience. Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals argues that memory is “burnt in” to the forgetful body as a necessary part of subject-formation and the requirements of a social order. Feminist philosophers have employed Nietzsche’s account to illuminate how gender, as memory, becomes embodied. While the account of the “burnt in” repetitions of gender allows (...)
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  19. Feminist Aims and a Trans-Inclusive Definition of “Woman”.Katie L. Kirkland - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 5 (1).
    In "Amelioration and Inclusion: Gender Identity and the Concept of Woman," Katharine Jenkins argues that Sally Haslanger's focal analysis of gender problematically excludes nonpassing trans women from the category "woman." However, Jenkins does not explain why this exclusion contradicts the feminist aims of Haslanger's account. In this paper, I advance two arguments that suggest that a trans-inclusive account of "woman" is crucial to the aims of feminism. I claim that the aims of feminism are to understand and combat women's oppression. (...)
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  20. On Gender Neutrality: Derrida and Transfeminism in Conversation.Marie Draz - 2017 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 7 (1):91-98.
    There is already a long history of conversation between feminism and deconstruction, feminist theorists and Derrida or Derrideans. That conversation has been by turns fraught and constructive. While some of these interactions have occurred in queer feminism, to date little has been done to stage an engagement between deconstruction and transfeminism. Naysayers might think that transfeminism is too recent and too identitarian a discourse to meaningfully interact with Derrida’s legacy. On the other hand, perhaps Derrida’s work was too embedded in (...)
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  21. Born This Way?: Time and the Coloniality of Gender.Draz Marie - 2017 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 31 (3):372-384.
    The “born this way” narrative remains a popular way to defend nonnormative genders and sexualities in the United States. While feminist and queer theorists have critiqued the narrative's implicit ahistorical and essentialist understanding of sexuality, the narrative's incorporation by the state as a way to regulate gender identity has gone largely underdeveloped. I argue that transgender accounts of this narrative reorient it amid questions of temporality, race, colonialism, and the nation-state, thereby allowing for a critique that does justice to the (...)
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  22. Firestonian Futures and Trans‐Affirming Presents.Loren Cannon - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):229-244.
    Shulamith Firestone's Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution was, upon its original publication, both radicacmen would be freed from the burden of childbirth, in which the nuclear family, gender roles, typical constructions of marriage and parenting are all a thing of the past, still for many seems radical, even forty-five years after its debut in 1970. With Firestone's recent passing, it is a particularly suitable time to reconsider her work in light of the medical, technological, and social changes (...)
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  23. Woman as a Politically Significant Term: A Solution to the Puzzle.E. Diaz‐Leon - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):245-258.
    What does woman mean? According to two competing views, it can be seen as a sex term or as a gender term. Recently, Jennifer Saul has put forward a contextualist view, according to which woman can have different meanings in different contexts. The main motivation for this view seems to involve moral and political considerations, namely, that this view can do justice to the claims of trans women. Unfortunately, Saul argues, on further reflection the contextualist view fails to do justice (...)
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  24. Misgendering and Its Moral Contestability.Stephanie Julia Kapusta - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):502-519.
    In this article, I consider the harms inflicted upon transgender persons through “misgendering,” that is, such deployments of gender terms that diminish transgender persons' self-respect, limit the discursive resources at their disposal to define their own gender, and cause them microaggressive psychological harms. Such deployments are morally contestable, that is, they can be challenged on ethical or political grounds. Two characterizations of “woman” proposed in the feminist literature are critiqued from this perspective. When we consider what would happen to transgender (...)
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  25. Trans*Formative Experiences.Rachel McKinnon - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (2):419-440.
    What happens when we consider transformative experiences from the perspective of gender transitions? In this paper I suggest that at least two insights emerge. First, trans* persons’ experiences of gender transitions show some limitations to L.A. Paul’s (forthcoming) decision theoretic account of transformative decisions. This will involve exploring some of the phenomenology of coming to know that one is trans, and in coming to decide to transition. Second, what epistemological effects are there to undergoing a transformative experience? By connecting some (...)
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  26. Heteronormativity and/as Violence: The “Sexing” of Gwen Araujo.Moya Lloyd - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):818-834.
    This paper will examine the violence of heteronormativity: the violence that constitutes and regulates bodies according to normative notions of sex, gender, and sexuality. This violence, I will argue, requires more than a focus on gendered or sexualized physical harms of the kinds normally examined when studying violence against sexual minorities or women. Rather, it necessitates focusing on the multiple modalities through which heteronormativity performs its violence on, through, and against bodies and persons, including through the production of certain bodies (...)
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  27. Feminism and Trans-Women.Rupert Read - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):26-28.
  28. Does the Government Need to Know Your Sex?Laurie Shrage - 2012 - Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (2):225-247.
  29. You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Edited by Laurie J. Shrage. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.Kim Atkins - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):877-881.
  30. The Reversibility of Teacher and Student: Teaching/Learning Intersectionality and Activism Amidst the LGBTQ Protest.Jennifer McWeeny - 2011 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues 10 (2):5-12.
  31. Review of Gender, Bullying, and Harassment. [REVIEW]Jeremy Pierce - 2011 - Men and Masculinities (14):630-632.
  32. Post-Queer: In Defense of a 'Trans-Gender Approach' or Trans-Gender as an Analytical Category.Patrick Cardon - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (1):138-150.
    The notion of gender, introduced into France by queens and drags in the late 20th century (the glorious period of the "drag-queens") and revitalized by American "queer", follows a traditionally feminist path where homosexual and particularly male issues are once again being hidden away. Having played a big part in popularizing that first version, Patrick Cardon proposes, in order to avoid any misunderstanding and escape once for all from any attempts at reification, to use the term and the universal notion (...)
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  33. Tracing a Ghostly Memory in My Throat. Reflections on Ftm Feminist Voice and Agency.C. Jacob Hale - 2009 - In Laurie J. Shrage (ed.), You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oup Usa. pp. 43.
  34. You’Ve Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity.Laurie J. Shrage (ed.) - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    Is sex identity a feature of one's mind or body, and is it a relational or intrinsic property? Who is in the best position to know a person's sex, do we each have a true sex, and is a person's sex an alterable characteristic? When a person's sex assignment changes, has the old self disappeared and a new one emerged; or, has only the public presentation of one's self changed? "You've Changed" examines the philosophical questions raised by the phenomenon of (...)
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  35. Introduction.Talia Bettcher & Ann Garry - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):1-10.
  36. Introduction to Hypatia Special Issue: ‘‘Transgender Studies and Feminism: Theory, Politics, and Gendered Realities.Talia Bettcher & Ann Garry - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):1-10.
  37. Defeating Bigenderism: Changing Gender Assumptions in the Twenty-First Century.Miqqi Alicia Gilbert - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):93-112.
    Bigenderism maintains there are only two genders, which correspond with the two sexes, male and female. Basic bigenderism requires that legal documents and public institutions designate a single invariant gender (that is, sex). Strict bigenderism applies these categories in a social context that stigmatizes "imperfect" men and women who do not reach ideals set by the bigenderist schema. I discuss these concepts and their implications, present three models that successively weaken bigenderist assumptions, and argue for the most radical of the (...)
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  38. Sex Change, Social Change: Reflections on Identity, Institutions, and Imperialism by Viviane Namaste.C. Jacob Hale - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):204-207.
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  39. Sex Change, Social Change: Reflections on Identity, Institutions, and Imperialism (Review).C. Jacob Hale - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):204-207.
  40. Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity. By Julia Serano.Vek Lewis - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):200-205.
  41. Undoing Theory: The “Transgender Question” and the Epistemic Violence of Anglo-American Feminist Theory.Viviane Namaste - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):11-32.
    For nearly twenty years, Anglo-American feminist theory has posed its own epistemological questions by looking at the lives and bodies of transsexuals and transvestites. This paper examines the impact of such scholarship on improving the everyday lives of the people central to such feminist argumentation. Drawing on indigenous scholarship and activisms, I conclude with a consideration of some central principles necessary to engage in feminist research and theory—to involve marginal people in the production of knowledge and to transform the knowledge-production (...)
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  42. Public Health, Private Parts: A Feminist Public-Health Approach to Trans Issues.Krista Scott-Dixon - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):33 - 55.
    This paper identifies and examines the possible contributions that emerging fields of study, particularly feminist public health, can make to enhancing and expanding trans/feminist theory and practice. A feminist public-health approach that is rooted in a tradition of political economy, social justice and equity studies, and an anti-oppression orientation, provides one of the most comprehensive "toolboxes" of perspectives, theoretical frameworks, methods, practices, processes, and strategies for trans-oriented scholars and activists.
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  43. Resisting Definition: Gendering Through Interaction and Relational Selfhood.Alexis Shotwell & Trevor Sangrey - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):56 - 76.
    This paper argues that trans and genderqueer people affect the gender formation and identity of non-trans people. We explore three instances of this relationship between trans and non-trans genders: an allegiance to inadequate liberal-individualist models of selfhood; tropes through which trans people are made to stand as theoretical objects with which to think about gender broadly; and a narrow focus on gender and evasion of an intersectional understanding of gender formation.
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  44. “A New Hope”: The Psychic Life of Passing.C. Riley Snorton - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):77-92.
    In an examination of the psychological aspect of passing, this essay challenges Sandy Stone's conceptualization and subsequent request for transsexuals to forego the act. Employing an auto-ethnographical approach, this essay contends that considering the “psychic” dimensions of passing requires different, and more hopeful, articulations about transsexual bodies, such that gendered and racialized transsexual bodies are produced not simply in terms of social reading and physical embodiment, but also through psychic affirmation and disavowal.
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  45. Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
    This essay examines the stereotype that transgender people are “deceivers” and the stereotype's role in promoting and excusing transphobic violence. The stereotype derives from a contrast between gender presentation and sexed body. Because gender presentation represents genital status, Bettcher argues, people who “misalign” the two are viewed as deceivers. The author shows how this system of gender presentation as genital representation is part of larger sexist and racist systems of violence and oppression.
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  46. Feminine Stubble.Rachel Burgess - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):230-237.
  47. A Hazy Concept of Equality.Mark Bell - 2004 - Feminist Legal Studies 12 (2):223-231.
    K.B. is a woman working for the United Kingdom National Health Service with a transsexual male partner. Her partner's male gender was not legally recognised in the United Kingdom and consequently they could not marry. Whilst the NHS pension scheme provides for the payment of a survivor's pension, this is only in respect of married partners. The European Court of Justice held that the combination of circumstances that prevented K.B.'s partner from receiving the survivor's pension amounted to sex discrimination in (...)
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  48. Transsexualism and “Transracialism”.Christine Overall - 2004 - Social Philosophy Today 20:183-193.
    This paper explores, from a feminist perspective, the justification of major surgical reshaping of the body. I define “transracialism” as the use of surgery to assist individuals to “cross” from being a member of one race to being a member of another. If transsexualism, involving the use of surgery to assist individuals to “cross” from female to male or from male to female, is morally acceptable, and if providing the medical and social resources to enable sex crossing is not morally (...)
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  49. Intersex in Context: Cultural Common Sense, Medicine and Ethics.David Edward Armstrong - 2003 - Dissertation, University of Southern California
    How should health care practitioners address human sexual ambiguity? ;The range of cultural response to intersex varies enormously. In India, hijras are a marginally accepted third sex who live in their own communities. Pokot intersexuals cannot raise families but may accrue great wealth. In early modern Europe intersexuals were required to adopt and live an consistent social gender. The Navaho nadle has been honoured as a "super person" whose experience of being both female and male confers special abilities. ;Since the (...)
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  50. Review: Susanne Schröter: FeMale. Über Grenzverläufe zwischen den Geschlechtern.Esther Kilchmann - 2003 - Die Philosophin 14 (28):97-99.
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