This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

83 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 83
  1. Plato's Phaedo as an Aesopian Fable About the Immortal Soul: A Fragmentary Attempt in Understanding.Ivan Chvatík - forthcoming - The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy.
  2. O Argumento Ontologico em Platao, I.Antonio Mesquita - forthcoming - Philosophica.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Philosopher’s Reward: Contemplation and Immortality in Plato’s Dialogues.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In Alex Long (ed.), Immortality in Ancient Philosophy.
    In dialogues ranging from the Symposium to the Timaeus, Plato appears to propose that the philosopher’s grasp of the forms may confer immortality upon him. Whatever can Plato mean in making such a claim? What does he take immortality to consist in, such that it could constitute a reward for philosophical enlightenment? And how is this proposal compatible with Plato’s insistence throughout his corpus that all soul, not just philosophical soul, is immortal? In this chapter, I pursue these questions by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Early Brentano and Plato’s God.Torrijos-Castrillejo David - 2020 - Brentano Studien. Internationales Jahrbuch der Franz Brentano Forschung 17:137-156.
    The interest of the young Brentano for the philosophy of Plato is linked to his Aristotelian studies. Brentano understands Aristotle’s philosophy in deep continuity with Plato’s one. This continuity is clear in one of the most controversial points of Brentano’s interpretation of Aristotle: the nature of God and the status of human soul. Brentano finds in both Plato and Aristotle a personal, monotheistic and creationistic God who also creates human soul, which is immortal. This approach is explained in some texts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Attunement Theory of the Soul in the Phaedo.Naoya Iwata - 2020 - Japan Studies in Classical Antiquity 4:35-52.
    At Phaedo 86b7–c2 Simmias puts forward the theory that the soul is the attunement of bodily elements. Many scholars have claimed that this theory originates in the Pythagoreans, especially Philolaus. The claim is largely based on their reading of the Phaedo, since we have scarce doxographical evidence. In this paper I show that the dialogue in question does not constitute any evidence for the Pythagorean origin of Simmias’ attunement theory, and that it rather represents the theory as stemming from a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Platonic Personal Immortality.Doug Reed - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly (3):812-836.
    I argue that Plato distinguishes between personal immortality and immortality of the soul. I begin by criticizing the consensus view that Plato identifies the person and the soul. I then turn to the issue of immortality. By considering passages from 'Symposium' and 'Timaeus', I make the case that Plato thinks that while the soul is immortal by nature, if a person is going to be immortal, they must become so. Finally, I argue that Plato has a psychological continuity approach to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Why the View of Intellect in De Anima I 4 Isn’T Aristotle’s Own.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):241-254.
    In De Anima I 4, Aristotle describes the intellect (nous) as a sort of substance, separate and incorruptible. Myles Burnyeat and Lloyd Gerson take this as proof that, for Aristotle, the intellect is a separate eternal entity, not a power belonging to individual humans. Against this reading, I show that this passage does not express Aristotle’s own views, but dialectically examines a reputable position (endoxon) about the intellect that seems to show that it can be subject to change. The passage’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Bessarion’s Conception of Platonic Psychology: The Immortality of the Soul in the Phaedrus (245c5-246a2).Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, Vol. 70: Renaissance and Modern Philosophy.
    Bessarion’s major philosophical treatise In Calumniatorem Platonis is a systematic approach to Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy written in response to George of Trebizond’s Comparatio Philosophorum Aristotelis et Platonis, which attacked Plato’s authority and proclaimed Aristotle’s superiority. A striking example of this is Bessarion’s attempt to defend Plato against George of Trebizond’s accusation that Plato did not offer sound arguments in favor of the immortality of the soul. In this article, I focus on Plato’s proof of the immortality of the soul (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Departed Souls? Tripartition at the Close of Plato’s Republic.Nathan Bauer - 2017 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 20 (1):139-157.
    Plato’s tripartite soul plays a central role in his account of justice in the Republic. It thus comes as a surprise to find him apparently abandoning this model at the end of the work, when he suggests that the soul, as immortal, must be simple. I propose a way of reconciling these claims, appealing to neglected features of the city-soul analogy and the argument for the soul’s division. The original true soul, I argue, is partitioned, but in a finer manner (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Aristotle’s Harmony with Plato on Separable and Immortal Soul.W. M. Coombs - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):541-552.
    The possibility of a harmony between the psychological doctrine of Aristotle and that of Plato marks a significant issue within the context of the debate surrounding Aristotle’s putative opposition to or harmony with Plato’s philosophy. The standard interpretation of Aristotle’s conception of the soul being purely hylomorphic leaves no room for harmonisation with Plato, nor does a functionalist interpretation that reduces Aristotle’s psychological doctrine to physicalist terms. However, these interpretations have serious drawbacks, both in terms of ad-hoc explanations formulated in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. On Being Reminded of Heraclitus by the Motifs in Plato’s Phaedo.Catherine Rowett - 2017 - In Enrica Fantino, Ulrike Muss, Charlotte Schubert & Kurt Sier (eds.), Heraklit Im Kontext. De Gruyter. pp. 373-414.
    In this paper I argue that we can better understand Plato’s Phaedo, if we don’t concentrate solely on the hints of Pythagoreanism among the characters and their doctrines, as though that were the principal key to the dialogue’s dialec- tical targets. I suggest that the dialogue is intended to make us think of the meta-physics of at least one other Presocratic predecessor, besides any Pythagorean influence (which may be much less than has been thought). Not least among the thinkers of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Η ερμηνεία του Βησσαρίωνα για την τρίτη απόδειξη της αθανασίας της ψυχής στον Φαίδωνα του Πλάτωνος (78b4-80c1) [Bessarion’s interpretation of Plato’s Phaedo: The third proof of the immortality of the soul (78b4-80c1)].Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2017 - Ηθική (11):52-63.
  13. Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Animal and Paradigm in Plato.Edward Butler - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):311-323.
    The paradigm according to which the cosmos is ordered by the demiurge is characterized in the Timaeus as ‘Animal Itself,’ while παράδειγμα in the vision of Er from the Republic denotes the patterns of lives chosen by individual humans and other animals. The essay seeks to grasp the animality of the paradigm, as well as the paradigmatic nature of animality, by means of the homology discernible between these usages. This inquiry affirms the value within a Platonic doctrine of principles of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Kátharsis e Psyché: A Purificação como Salvação da Alma no Fédon de Platão.André Miranda Decotelli da Silva - 2014 - Dissertation, UFF, Brazil
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Corpses, Self-Defense, and Immortality: Callicles’ Fear of Death in the Gorgias.Emily A. Austin - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):33-52.
  17. Soul, World, and Idea: An Interpretation of Plato's "Republic" and "Phaedo".Daniel Sherman - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    The theme of Soul, World, and Idea is the meaning of immortality and eternality for Plato as seen in the Republic and Phaedo. It offers a reinterpretation of the platonic ideas and the immortality of the soul as wholly within lived experience.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Ethics and Psychology: The Concept of the Immortality of the Soul.Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2013 - In Efe Dyran & Ayşe Güngör (eds.), Interactions in the History of Philosophy. MSGSÜ. pp. 75-81.
    The aim of this paper is to explore the consequences of accepting the immortality of the soul with regard to moral behavior. Philosophers from different periods and fields offer a variety of arguments which prove the immortal nature of the soul based on ethical theories, such as happiness is the end of mankind, man’s incapability of fulfilling his final purpose, the posthumous award of divine justice and so on. Through a critical appraisal of different but representative philosophical approaches to immortality (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Soul as Structure in Plato's Phaedo.Douglas J. Young - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (4):469 - 498.
  20. The Rivers of Tartarus: Plato's Geography of Dying and Coming-Back-to-Life.Elizabeth Pender - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Simmias’ Objection to Socrates in the Phaedo: Harmony, Symphony and Some Later Platonic/ Patristic Responses to the Mind/Soul-Body Question.Kevin Corrigan - 2010 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (2):147-162.
    Simmias' famous epiphenomenalist analogy of the soul-body relation to the harmony and strings of a lyre leads to Socrates' initial refutation and subsequent prolonged defense of soul's immortality in the Phaedo. It also yields in late antiquity significant treatments of the harmony relation by Plotinus and Porphyry that present a larger context for viewing the nature of harmony in the soul and the psycho-somatic compound. But perhaps the most detailed treatment of the musical analogy, and certainly the most radical, is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Plato and Aristotle in the Underworld.Carl Murray - 2010 - Philosophy Now 77:33-34.
  23. The Geography of Finitude: Myth and Earth in Plato’s Phaedo.Sara Brill - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):5-23.
    Plato’s use of afterlife myths is often viewed as an abandonment of rational discourse for a coercive practice designed to persuade citizens to be concerned about the condition of their souls by appealing to their worst fears about the afterlife. But such interpretations overlook the frequently critical tenor of Plato’s myths. In this paper I develop the claim that Plato appeals to muthos as a means of critiquing various specific logoi by focusing upon the relationship between the myth of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Innovative Dialogue. Probing the Boundaries: Re-Imagining Death and Dying.Dennis Cooley & Lloyd Steffen (eds.) - 2009
  25. “There is Good Hope That Death is a Blessing”.J. F. Humphrey - 2009 - In Dennis Cooley & Lloyd Steffen (eds.), Innovative Dialogue. Probing the Boundaries: Re-Imagining Death and Dying. Interdisciplinary Press.
    In Plato’s Apology (29a-b), Socrates agues that he does not fear death; indeed, to fear death is a sign of ignorance. It is to claim to know what one in fact does not know (Ap. 29 a-b). Perhaps, Socrates suggests, death is not a great evil after all, but “the greatest of all goods.” At the end of the dialogue, after the judges have voted on the final verdict and Socrates has received the death penalty, the philosopher considers two common (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Plato's Eschatological Myths.Michael Inwood - 2008 - In Catalin Partenie (ed.), Plato's Myths. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Sheffield (F.C.C.) Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Pp. X + 252. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £50. ISBN: 978-0-19-928677-. [REVIEW]Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (1):62-64.
  28. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets, by Radcliffe G. Edmonds III. [REVIEW]Catherine Collobert - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):219-223.
  30. « Immortel » Et « Impérissable » Dans le Phédon de Platon.Denis O'Brien - 2007 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (2):109-262.
    To unravel the intricacies of the last argument of the Phaedo for the immortality of the soul, the reader has to peel away successive presuppositions, his own, Plato's and not least the presupposition that Plato very skilfully portrays as being shared by Socrates and his friends.A first presupposition is the reader's own. According to our modern ways of thinking, a soul that is immortal, if there is such a thing, is a soul that lives forever. That presupposition is not shared (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Two Concepts of the Soul in Plato's Phaedo: A Beginner's Guide to the Phaedo and Some Related Platonic Texts on the Immortality of the Soul.Ryan Topping - 2007 - Upa.
    Two Concepts of the Soul in Plato's Phaedo is a fresh study of Plato's psychology with particular focus on his arguments for the immortality of the soul. Through detailed textual study, this new work examines the structure of the dialogue making explicit the nature of the argumentation within the text and its relation to Plato's other accounts of immortality.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Politics of the Afterlife in Plato's Gorgias.Damjan Krnjevic - 2006 - In Stanley Rosen & Nalin Ranasinghe (eds.), Logos and Eros: Essays Honoring Stanley Rosen. St. Augustine's Press.
  33. Dr. Socoski Philosophy 300 13 December 2006 Harry Potter and the Immortality of the Soul: An Examination Through Plato.Jeff Stoyanoff - 2006 - Philosophy 300:13.
  34. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo. Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95-115.
    This paper aims to achieve a better understanding of what Socrates means by "συμφωνε[unrepresentable symbol]ν" in the sections of the "Phaedo" in which he uses the word, and how its use contributes both to the articulation of the hypothetical method and the proof of the soul's immortality. Section I sets out the well-known problems for the most obvious readings of the relation, while Sections II and III argue against two remedies for these problems, the first an interpretation of what the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo. Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95 - 115.
    This paper aims to achieve a better understanding of what Socrates means by "συμφωνε[unrepresentable symbol]ν" in the sections of the "Phaedo" in which he uses the word, and how its use contributes both to the articulation of the hypothetical method and the proof of the soul's immortality. Section I sets out the well-known problems for the most obvious readings of the relation, while Sections II and III argue against two remedies for these problems, the first an interpretation of what the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. Αἰσώπου Τι Γέλοιον Plato’s Phaedo as an Aesopian Fable About the Immortal Soul: A Fragmentary Attempt in Understanding.Ivan Chvatík - 2005 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5:225-243.
  37. Review of Radcliffe G. Edmonds III, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes and the 'Orphic' Gold Tablets[REVIEW]Stephen Halliwell - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (5).
  38. Knowing Persons: A Study in Plato (Review). [REVIEW]George Rudebusch - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):108-109.
  39. Phaedo of Elis and Plato on the Soul.George Boys-Stones - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (1):1 - 23.
    Phaedo of Elis was well-known as a writer of Socratic dialogues, and it seems inconceivable that Plato could have been innocent of intertextuality when, excusing himself on the grounds of illness, he made him the narrator of one of his own: the "Phaedo". In fact the psychological model outlined by Socrates in this dialogue converges with the evidence we have (especially from fragments of the Zopyrus) for Phaedo's own beliefs about the soul. Specifically, Phaedo seems to have thought that non-rational (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. Penology and Eschatology in Plato's Myths (Review).Luc Brisson - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (3):410-411.
  41. Socrates, Crito, and Their Debt to Asclepius.Mark L. Mcpherran - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):71-92.
  42. Dialectic in Plato's "Phaedo".Miriam Newton Byrd - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Georgia
    In this dissertation I propose a new method of interpreting Plato's Phaedo based upon Socrates' description of the "summoner" at Republic 522e--525a. I elucidate the summoner paradigm as a four step process in which one notices an apparent contradiction in perception, separates two opposites from one mixed perception, realizes the priority of the opposites, and recognizes their transcendence. In the Republic , its primary purpose is to move the subject from pistis to dianoia and from dianoia to nous. The summoner (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The Choice of Unjust Lives in Plato's Republic.Y. Kurihara - 2001 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 12.
  44. Plato's Self-Corrective Development of the Concepts of Soul, Forms, and Immortality in Three Arguments of the Phaedo.Martha C. Beck - 1999 - E. Mellen Press.
    This study argues both that the proofs are ultimately unconvincing and that Plato was aware of the problems. The Phaedo is shown as a truly dialectical philosophical conversation about the immortality of the soul.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The Ideal of Godlikeness.David Sedley - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 2: Ethics, Politics, Religion, and the Soul. Oxford University Press. pp. 309-328.
  46. A Defense of Plato's Argument for the Immortality of the Soul at Republic X 608c-611a.Eric A. Brown - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (3):211 - 238.
    Despite the bad press, Plato has a valid argument for immortality from three premises: (1) if the natural evil of a thing cannot destroy it, then it is indestructible; (2) the natural evil of the soul is vice; and (3) vice cannot destroy the soul. These premises are contestable, of course, but Plato has some good reasons for advancing them.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. The Role of the Affinity Argument in the Phaedo.Matthew Elton - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (3):313 - 316.
  48. ''Socrates' Last Proof-The Immortality of the Soul in'Phaedo'-99c-105e.J. Freudiger - 1997 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 104 (1).
  49. Plato's Affinity Argument for the Immortality of the Soul.David Apolloni - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):5-32.
    Plato's Affinity Argument for the Immortality of the Soul DAVID APOLLONI VROM Phaedo 78b to 8od, Socrates attempts to answer Simmias' fear that, even if the soul has existed eternally before birth, it might be dispersed and this would be the end of its existence . His answer is an argument which attempts to show that the soul is incomposite because it is similar to the Forms and dissimilar to physical objects. To date, this argument -- the so-called Aftin- ity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50. Plato’s Cyclical Argument for the Immortality of the Soul.Anna Greco - 1996 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 78 (3):225-252.
1 — 50 / 83