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  1. Two Kinds of Mental Conflict in Republic IV.Galen Barry & Edith Gwendolyn Nally - forthcoming - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis.
  2. What the Forms Are Not: Plato on Conceptualism in Parmenides 132b–C.Sosseh Assaturian - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (2):353-368.
    Conceptualism—the view that universals are mental entities without an external, independent, or substantial reality—has enjoyed popularity at various points throughout the history of philosophy. While Plato’s Theory of Forms is not a conceptualist theory of universals, we find at Parmenides 132b–c the startling conceptualist suggestion from a young Socrates that each Form might be a noēma, or a mental entity. This suggestion and Parmenides’ cryptic objections to it have been overshadowed by their placement directly after the notoriously difficult Third Man (...)
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  3. Community with Nothing in Common? Plato's Subtler Response to Protagoras.Mark Sentesy - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1):155-183.
    The Protagoras examines how community can occur between people who have nothing in common. Community, Protagoras holds, has no natural basis. Seeking the good is therefore not a theoretical project, but a matter of agreement. This position follows from his claim that “man is the measure of all things.” For Socrates community is based on a natural good, which is sought through theoretical inquiry. They disagree about what community is, and what its bases and goals are. But Plato illustrates the (...)
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  4. Pathos in the Theaetetus.Evan Keeling - 2019 - In Evan Keeling & Luca Pitteloud (eds.), Psychology and Ontology in Plato. Springer Verlag.
    This paper is a test case for the claim, made famous by Myles Burnyeat, that the ancient Greeks did not recognize subjective truth or knowledge. After a brief discussion of the issue in Sextus Empiricus, I then turn to Plato's discussion of Protagorean views in the Theaetetus. In at least two passages, it seems that Plato attributes to Protagoras the view that our subjective experiences constitute truth and knowledge, without reference to any outside world of objects. I argue that these (...)
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  5. Psychology and Ontology in Plato.Evan Keeling & Luca Pitteloud (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This edited volume brings together contributions from prominent scholars to discuss new approaches to Plato’s philosophy, especially in the burgeoning fields of Platonic ontology and psychology. Topics such as the relationship between mind, soul and emotions, as well as the connection between ontology and ethics are discussed through the analyses of dialogues from Plato’s middle and late periods, such as the Republic, Symposium, Theaetetus, Timaeus and Laws. These works are being increasingly studied both as precursors for Aristotelian philosophy and in (...)
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  6. Aristotle’s Harmony with Plato on Separable and Immortal Soul.W. M. Coombs - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):541-552.
    The possibility of a harmony between the psychological doctrine of Aristotle and that of Plato marks a significant issue within the context of the debate surrounding Aristotle’s putative opposition to or harmony with Plato’s philosophy. The standard interpretation of Aristotle’s conception of the soul being purely hylomorphic leaves no room for harmonisation with Plato, nor does a functionalist interpretation that reduces Aristotle’s psychological doctrine to physicalist terms. However, these interpretations have serious drawbacks, both in terms of ad-hoc explanations formulated in (...)
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  7. On Being Reminded of Heraclitus by the Motifs in Plato’s Phaedo.Catherine Rowett - 2017 - In Enrica Fantino, Ulrike Muss, Charlotte Schubert & Kurt Sier (eds.), Heraklit Im Kontext. De Gruyter. pp. 373-414.
    In this paper I argue that we can better understand Plato’s Phaedo, if we don’t concentrate solely on the hints of Pythagoreanism among the characters and their doctrines, as though that were the principal key to the dialogue’s dialec- tical targets. I suggest that the dialogue is intended to make us think of the meta-physics of at least one other Presocratic predecessor, besides any Pythagorean influence (which may be much less than has been thought). Not least among the thinkers of (...)
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  8. Human Wisdom, Studies in Ancient Greek Philosophy.Ostenfeld Erik - 2016 - Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag.
    This book offers inter alia a systematic investigation of the actual argumentative strategy of Socratic conversation and explorations of Socratic and Platonic morality including an examination ofeudaimonia and the mental conception of health in the Republic as self-control, with a view to the relation of individual health/happiness to social order. The essays cover a period from 1968 to 2012. Some of them are now published for the first time. Self-motion in the later dialogues involves tripartition and tripartition in turn involves (...)
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  9. Faculties in Ancient Philosophy.Klaus Corcilius - 2015 - In Dominik Perler (ed.), The Faculties: A History. Oxford University Press. pp. 19-58.
  10. Courage and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato’s Republic.Josh Wilburn - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    In this paper I examine the account of courage offered in Books 3 and 4 of the Republic and consider its relation to the account of courage and cowardice found in the final argument of the Protagoras. I defend two main lines of thought. The first is that in the Republic Plato does not abandon the Protagoras’ view that all cases of cowardice involve mistaken judgment or ignorance about what is fearful. Rather, he continues to treat cowardly behavior as an (...)
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  11. Sherman, Daniel., Soul, World and Idea: An Interpretation of Plato's Republic and Phaedo. [REVIEW]Kevin Crotty - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (1):197-199.
  12. Anarchic Souls: Plato’s Depiction of the ‘Democratic Man’.Mark Johnstone - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (2):139-59.
    In books 8 and 9 of Plato’s Republic, Socrates provides a detailed account of the nature and origins of four main kinds of vice found in political constitutions and in the kinds of people that correspond to them. The third of the four corrupt kinds of person he describes is the ‘democratic man’. In this paper, I ask what ‘rules’ in the democratic man’s soul. It is commonly thought that his soul is ruled in some way by its appetitive part, (...)
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  13. Harmony Between Arkhē and Telos in Patristic Platonism and the Imagery of Astronomical Harmony Applied to Apokatastasis 1.Ilaria Ramelli - 2013 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 7 (1):1-49.
    This study investigates the idea of harmony as a protological and eschatological principle in three outstanding Patristic philosophers, well steeped in the Platonic tradition: Origen, Gregory Nyssen, and Evagrius. All of them attached an extraordinary importance to harmony, homonoia, and unity in the arkhē and, even more, in the telos. This ideal is opposed to the disagreement/dispersion of rational creatures’ acts of volition after their fall and before the eventual apokatastasis. These Christian Platonists are among the strongest supporters of the (...)
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  14. The Nature of the Spirited Part of the Soul and Its Object.Tad Brennan - 2012 - In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge University Press. pp. 102--127.
  15. The Unity of the Soul in Plato's Republic.Eric Brown - 2012 - In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge, UK: pp. 53-73.
    This essay argues that Plato in the Republic needs an account of why and how the three distinct parts of the soul are parts of one soul, and it draws on the Phaedrus and Gorgias to develop an account of compositional unity that fits what is said in the Republic.
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  16. Compte Rendu de F. Pelosi, Plato: On Music, Soul and Body.Catherine Collobert - 2012 - Plato Journal 12 (Plato 12 (2012)).
    Cet ouvrage constitue la version révisée d'une thèse de doctorat soutenue à la Scuola Normale Superiore de Pise, et traduite en anglais. Composé de quatre chapitres, l'ouvrage se propose d'abord d'examiner le rôle que Platon attribue à la musique dans l'éducation, pour ensuite analyser la relation que la musique entretient avec l'âme et le corps. F. Pelosi étudie la conception platonicienne de la musique et envisage son importance pour comprendre non seulement la relation corps-esprit chez Platon, mais (…) - 12. (...)
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  17. Music, Body, Soul Pelosi Plato on Music, Soul and Body. Translated by Sophie Henderson. Pp. Viii + 228. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Cased, £55, US$95. ISBN: 978-0-521-76045-4. [REVIEW]Theodora A. Hadjimichael - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (2):403-404.
  18. Theriomorphism and the Composite Soul in Plato.Kathryn Morgan - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
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  19. La Geometria Dell'anima: Riflessioni Su Matematica Ed Etica in Platone.Paolo Pagani - 2012 - Orthotes.
    Questo testo nasce da alcune indagini sul nesso tra matematica e filosofia in ambiente “accademico”. È interessante notare che l'esplorazione di tale nesso costituisce un felice tratto di continuità tra gli studi più classici e ...
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  20. « The Form Of Soul In The Phaedo ».Brian Prince - 2012 - Plato 11 11.
    Although the Phaedo never mentions a Form of Soul explicitly, the dialogue implies this Form’s existence. First, a number of passages in which Socrates describes his views about Forms imply that there are very many Forms; thus, Socrates’ general description of his theory gives no ground for denying that there is a Form of Soul. Second, the final argument for immortality positively requires a Form of Soul.
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  21. Knowledge as 'True Belief Plus Individuation' in Plato.Theodore Scaltsas - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):137-149.
    In Republic V, Plato distinguishes two different cognitive powers, knowledge and belief, which operate differently on different types of object. I argue that in Republic VI Plato modifies this account, and claims that there is a single cognitive power, which under different circumstances behaves either as knowledge or as belief. I show that the circumstances which turn true belief into knowledge are the provision of an individuation account of the object of belief, which reveals the ontological status and the nature (...)
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  22. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
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  23. Natural and Neutral States in Plato's Philebus.Kelly E. Arenson - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (2):191-209.
    In the Philebus, Plato claims that there exists a natural state of organic harmony in which a living organism is neither restored nor depleted. In contrast to many scholars, I argue that this natural state of organic stability differs from a neutral state between pleasure and pain that Plato also discusses in the dialogue: the natural is without any changes to the organism, the neutral is merely without the perception of these changes. I contend that Plato considers the natural state (...)
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  24. Conversations Platonic and Neoplatonic: Intellect, Soul, and Nature.Gary Gabor - 2011 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (2):339-341.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  25. The Mortal Soul in Plato's Timaeus.Elias Georgoulas - 2011 - Elenchos 32 (1):1.
  26. Plato's Account of the Diseases of the Soul in Timaeus 86B1–87B9.Peter Lautner - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (1):22-39.
    The paper aims to show that ανoια is the general term for the diseases of the soul, and that μανία and αμαϑία are not necessarily two distinct species but two levels of the same disease: ignorance signifies the cognitive state, whereas madness indicates both a cognitive state and a specific phenomenal character. Plato's other remarks on psychic ailments can be incorporated into this account. The result can also be accommodated to the general theory of the soul–body relationship in the dialogue. (...)
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  27. Pensare l’anima nello spazio iconico dei dialoghi di Platone.Lidia Palumbo - 2011 - Chôra 9:13-31.
    Il y a dans les Dialogues de Platon une idée scénique de l’âme. Le texte lui-même peut-être lu comme une représentation, comme une mise en scène de la pensée qui se déploie dans l’âme. L’âme, à son tour, contient une population psychique avec de nombreux habitants. Ces habitants de l’âme parlent entre eux, et ce sont ces discours qui font l’âme, parce que la psyche pour Platon a une nature linguistique, est un tissu de mots et d’images. Dans le Philèbe (...)
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  28. On the Moral Value of Physical Activity: Body and Soul in Plato's Account of Virtue.David Carr - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):3 – 15.
    It is arguable that some of the most profound and perennial issues and problems of philosophy concerning the nature of human agency, the role of reason and knowledge in such agency and the moral status and place of responsibility in human action and conduct receive their sharpest definition in Plato's specific discussion in the Republic of the human value of physical activities. From this viewpoint alone, Plato's exploration of this issue might be considered a locus classicus in the philosophy of (...)
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  29. Simmias’ Objection to Socrates in the Phaedo: Harmony, Symphony and Some Later Platonic/ Patristic Responses to the Mind/Soul-Body Question.Kevin Corrigan - 2010 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (2):147-162.
    Simmias' famous epiphenomenalist analogy of the soul-body relation to the harmony and strings of a lyre leads to Socrates' initial refutation and subsequent prolonged defense of soul's immortality in the Phaedo. It also yields in late antiquity significant treatments of the harmony relation by Plotinus and Porphyry that present a larger context for viewing the nature of harmony in the soul and the psycho-somatic compound. But perhaps the most detailed treatment of the musical analogy, and certainly the most radical, is (...)
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  30. Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality.Andrea Nightingale & David Sedley (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    How does God think? How, ideally, does a human mind function? Must a gap remain between these two paradigms of rationality? Such questions exercised the greatest ancient philosophers, including those featured in this book: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Plotinus. This volume encompasses a series of studies by leading scholars, revisiting key moments of ancient philosophy and highlighting the theme of human and divine rationality in both moral and cognitive psychology. It is a tribute to Professor A. A. Long, (...)
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  31. Williams and the City-Soul Analogy.G. Ferrari - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):407-413.
  32. Are Plato’s Soul-Parts Psychological Subjects?Anthony W. Price - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):1-15.
    It is well-known that Plato’s Republic introduces a tripartition of the incarnate human soul; yet quite how to interpret his ‘parts’ 1 is debated. On a strong reading, they are psychological subjects – much as we take ourselves to be, but homunculi, not homines. On a weak reading, they are something less paradoxical: aspects of ourselves, identified by characteristic mental states, dispositional and occurrent, that tend to come into conflict. Christopher Bobonich supports the strong reading in his Plato’s Utopia Recast: (...)
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  33. St. Thomas Aquinas's Concept of the Human Soul and the Influence of Platonism.Patrick Quinn - 2009 - In Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth & John M. Dillon (eds.), The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul: Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions. Brill.
  34. Aristotle, on the Life-Bearing Spirit (de Spiritu): A Discussion with Plato and His Predecessors on Pneuma as the Instrumental Body of the Soul.A. P. Bos - 2008 - Brill.
    The work _De spiritu_ is an important but neglected work by Aristotle. It clearly shows for the first time that Aristotle assumed a special body as the ‘instrument’ of the soul. By means of this soul/body the soul forms the visible body of plants, animals and human beings.
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  35. Embodying Intelligence: Animals and Us in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber Carpenter - 2008 - In Jure Zovko & John Dillon (eds.), Platonism and Forms of Intelligence. Akademie Verlag. pp. 39-58.
  36. Desires and Faculties in Plato and Aristotle.Deborah K. Modrak - 2008 - Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):163-174.
  37. Appearances and Calculations: Plato's Division of the Soul.Jessica Moss - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 34:35-68.
  38. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  39. Carone on the Mind-Body Problem in Late Plato.Francesco Fronterotta - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):231-236.
    In this paper I examine G. R. Carone's interpretation of the mind-body problem in late Plato, published in a recent issue of this review. Against Carone's attempt to attribute Plato with a reductionist thesis, whereby the soul can be reduced to the body, I argue that a careful reading of the Timaeus confirms that Plato held a dualist thesis, the soul consisting of an incorporeal substance which cannot be reduced to the corporeal substance the body consists of.
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  40. Plato and Psychic Harmony: A Recipe for Mental Health or Mental Illness?Angela Hobbs - 2007 - Philosophical Inquiry 29 (5):103-124.
  41. Sacred Doorways: Tracing the Body in Plato’s Timaeus.Jena G. Jolissaint - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):333-352.
    This paper develops a structural parallel between the maternal/feminine body in Greek mythology and the figure of the body in Plato’s Timaeus. HistoricallyPlato is often portrayed as a thinker who is concerned with the corporeal only insofar as philosophy is engaged in transcending bodily limitations. Yet the Timaeus is not engaged in producing a dualistic opposition between the intelligible and the sensible, nor is Platonic philosophy a rejection of life in favor of the perfect wisdom that comes with death. The (...)
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  42. The Argument of the Philebus.Joe Mccoy - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1-16.
    This essay explores Socrates’ argumentative strategy in the Philebus, which is a response to the view that pleasure is the good. Socrates leads his interlocutorsthrough a series of steps in order to demonstrate to them the “conditions and dispositions of soul” upon which hedonism rests. Socrates’ aim is not to refute the claim that pleasure is a good, but rather to show the dependence of the experience of pleasure on intellect and the other elements of the life of mind. In (...)
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  43. La sublimazione dell'eros. La "Repubblica" e Freud.Marco Solinas - 2007 - Chronos 25 (1):69-92.
  44. Descartes, Plato and the Cave.Buckle Stephen - 2007 - Philosophy 82 (2):338.
    It has been a commonplace, embodied in philosophy curricula the world over, to think of Descartes' philosophy as he seems to present it: as a radical break with the past, as inaugurating a new philosophical problematic centred on epistemology and on a radical dualism of mind and body. In several ways, however, recent scholarship has undermined the simplicity of this picture. It has, for example, shown the considerable degree of literary artifice in Descartes' central works, and thereby brought out the (...)
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  45. L'esprit Matériel: Nouvelle Anatomie, Où l'On Profane Et Décrit Par le Menu les Derniers Secrets de Platon.Jean-Louis Cherlonneix - 2006 - Harmattan.
    Que se cache-t-il derrière L'Esprit Matériel ?
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  46. The Imprint of the Soul: Psychosomatic Affection in Plato, Gorgias, and the “Orphic” Gold Tablets.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2006 - Mouseion 3 (6):383-398.
    Ancient intellectuals from Gorgias of Leontini forward employed the notion of 'imprinting' the soul in order to describe various sorts of psychic affections. The dominant context for this scientific language remains juridical both in 4th Century philosophy (e.g. Plato's description of the soul being whipped in the Gorgias) and in religion (e.g. the soul's imprint as keyword in "Orphic" Gold Tablets). This tradition continues in the fragments of Plutarch's de Libidine et Aegritudine, although without proper attention to its origins in (...)
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  47. Clitophon M. Kremer (Ed.): Plato's Cleitophon. On Socrates and the Modern Mind . Pp. Xii + 87. Lanham, Boulder, New York, Toronto, and Oxford: Lexington, 2004. Paper, £16.95. ISBN: 0-7391-0818-. [REVIEW]G. S. Bowe - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):435-.
  48. Mind and Body in Late Plato.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2005 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 87 (3):227-269.
    In this paper I re-examine the status of the mind-body relation in several of Plato’s late dialogues. A range of views has been attributed to Plato here. For example, it has been thought that Plato is a substance dualist, for whom the mind can exist independently of the body; or an attribute dualist, who has left behind the strong dualistic commitments of the Phaedo by allowing that the mind may be the subject of spatial movements. But even in cases where (...)
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  49. Desideri: fenomenologia degenerativa e strategie di controllo.Marco Solinas - 2005 - In Mario Vegetti (ed.), Platone. La Repubblica. Bibliopolis. pp. vol. VI, 471-498.
  50. After the Ascent: Plato on Becoming Like God.John M. Armstrong - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 26:171-183.
    Plato is associated with the idea that the body holds us back from knowing ultimate reality and so we should try to distance ourselves from its influence. This sentiment appears is several of his dialogues including Theaetetus where the flight from the physical world is compared to becoming like God. In some major dialogues of Plato's later career such as Philebus and Laws, however, the idea of becoming like God takes a different turn. God is an intelligent force that tries (...)
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