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  1. Anamnēsis as Aneuriskein, Anakinein, and Analambanein in the Meno.Douglas A. Shepardson - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This article examines the theory of recollection in the Meno and attempts to unravel some longstanding puzzles about it. What are the prenatal objects of the soul’s vision? What are the postnatal objects of the soul’s recollection? What is innate in the Meno? Why does Socrates (prima facie) suggest that both knowledge and true opinion are innate? To answer these questions, the article pays particular attention to the ana- prefix in the verbs aneuriskô, anakineô and analambanô and suggests that they (...)
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  2. Conhecimento e Definição no Mênon de Platão.Davi Heckert César Bastos - 2020 - Kinesis 12 (31):172-185.
    Through detailed analysis of Plato’s Meno, I identify and set general argumentative rules (useful both to scientists and philosophers) concerning how to use definitions. I show how the character Socrates establishes strong requirements for knowledge in general, i.e., that the knowledge of the definition of a thing must be prior to the knowledge of properties or instances of that thing. Socrate’s requirements and the way he characterizes a definition (as coextensive to the definiendum, not circular, true and explanatorily relevant) lead (...)
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  3. La objeción de Aristóteles a la teoría platónica de la reminiscencia.Alejandro Farieta - 2015 - Pensamiento y Cultura 18 (2):6-28.
    This paper provides an interpretation of Aristotle’s criticism to the solution to Meno’s Paradox suggested by Plato. According to Aristotle, when Plato says that reminiscence (anámnēsis) is achieved, what is actually achieved is induction (epagōgê). Our interpretation is based on two aspects: (1) semantic criticism, since Plato’s use of the term anámnēsis is unusual; and (2) the theory is not able to give an adequate explanation of the effective discovery.
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  4. The Possibility of Inquiry. Meno's Paradox From Socrates to Sextus. [REVIEW]Justin Joseph Vlasits - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):580-583.
  5. “ἐὰν ὡσαύτως τῇ ψυχῇ ἐπὶ πάντα ἴδῃς” (Platonis Parmenides, 132a 1 - 132b 2). Voir les Idées avec son âme et le “Troisième homme” de Platon.Leone Gazziero - 2014 - Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 32 (1):35-85.
    Few arguments from the past have stirred up as much interest as Aristotle’s “Third man” and not so many texts have received as much attention as its account in chapter 22 of the Sophistici elenchi. And yet, several issues about both remain highly controversial, starting from the very nature of the argument at stake and the exact signification of some of its features. The essay provides a close commentary of the text, dealing with its main difficulties and suggesting an overall (...)
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  6. Conocimiento, descubrimiento Y reminiscencia en el menón de platón.Alejandro Farieta - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):205-234.
    This work articulates two thesis: one Socratic and one Platonic; and displays how the first one is heir of the second. The Socratic one is called the principle of priority of definition; the Platonic one is the Recollection theory. The articulation between both theses is possible due to the Meno’s paradox, which makes a criticism on the first thesis, but it is solved with the second one. The consequence of this articulation is a new interpretation of the Recollection theory, as (...)
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  7. Knowledge, Discovery and Reminiscence in Plato's Meno.Alejandro Farieta - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):205-234.
    This work articulates two thesis: one Socratic and one Platonic; and displays how the first one is heir of the second. The Socratic one is called the principle of priority of definition; the Platonic one is the Recollection theory. The articulation between both theses is possible due to the Meno’s paradox, which makes a criticism on the first thesis, but it is solved with the second one. The consequence of this articulation is a new interpretation of the Recollection theory, as (...)
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  8. Recollection and the Method of Collection and Division in the Phaedrus.Cristina Ionescu - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:1-24.
    When dealing with the metaphysical and epistemological implications of the Phaedrus, scholars have had the tendency to focus either on recollection or on discerning the methodological articulations of dialectical rhetoric. The present paper explores the relation between recollection and the dialectical method, and argues that recollection and the method of collection and division are complementary aspects of dialectical investigation, the method providing a strategy of reasoning, while the theory of recollection provides the metaphysical horizon within which collection and division can (...)
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  9. Recollection and the Mathematician's Method in Plato's Meno.E. Landry - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):143-169.
    I argue that recollection, in Plato's Meno , should not be taken as a method, and, if it is taken as a myth, it should not be taken as a mere myth. Neither should it be taken as a truth, a priori or metaphorical. In contrast to such views, I argue that recollection ought to be taken as an hypothesis for learning. Thus, the only methods demonstrated in the Meno are the elenchus and the hypothetical, or mathematical, method. What Plato's (...)
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  10. Via Platonica zum Unbewussten. Platon und Freud (pdf: Inhaltszerzeichnis, Vegetti Vorwort, Einleitung).Marco Solinas - 2012 - Turia + Kant.
    Solinas’ Studie untersucht den Einfluss von Platons Anschauungen von Traum, Wunsch und Wahn auf den jungen Freud. Anhand der Untersuchung einiger zeitgenössischer kulturwissenschaftlicher Arbeiten, die bereits in die ersten Ausgabe der Traumdeutung Eingang fanden, wird Freuds nachhaltige Vertrautheit mit den platonischen Lehren erläutert und seine damit einhergehende direkte Textkenntnis der thematisch relevanten Stellen aus Platons Staat aufgezeigt. Die strukturelle Analogie von Freud’schem und platonischem Seelenbegriff wird inhaltlich am Traum als »Königsweg zum Unbewussten«, in dem von Freud selbst angesprochenen Verhältnis von (...)
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  11. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
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  12. Re-Examining Recollection: The Platonic Account of Learning.Joe Mccoy - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (4):451-466.
    The doctrine of recollection is one of the most controversial in the Platonic corpus, and much scholarship has been aimed at altering the doctrine to resolve its paradoxical features, many of which, I argue, are generated by a failure to appreciate the difference between memory and the distinct capacity of recollection. In several of the Platonic dialogues, Socrates gives an account of how recollection functions in ordinary contexts, and thus provides a basis for showing how anamnesis may be employed to (...)
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  13. Recollection and Knowledge.Aleksandar Nikitovic - 2011 - Filozofija I Društvo 22 (1):207-218.
    Ancient Greek ethics held in its heritage contradictory relation in understanding of virtue as a key notion on which were founded polis and politics. Sharpening and revealing of this contradiction was mostly contribution of the sophistic movement, which by rational gauge observed philosophically not enough clarified topics of the Ancient Greek worldview. To solve contradiction arisen from traditional viewpoint premised on the principle that virtue cannot be taught and stand?point that virtue is connected to knowledge, Plato introduces notion of recollection. (...)
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  14. Rethinking Recollection and Plato’s Theory of Forms.Lydia Schumacher - 2010 - Lyceum 11 (2).
  15. Meno’s Paradox, the Slave-Boy Interrogation, and the Unity of Platonic Recollection.Lee Franklin - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):349-377.
    Plato invokes the Theory of Recollection to explain both ordinary and philosophical learning. In a new reading of Meno’s Paradox and the Slave-Boy Interrogation, I explain why these two levels are linked in a single theory of learning. Since, for Plato, philosophical inquiry starts in ordinary discourse, the possibility of success in inquiry is tied to the character of the ordinary comprehension we bring to it. Through the claim that all learning is recollection, Plato traces the knowledge achievable through inquiry (...)
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  16. Escaping One's Own Notice Knowing: Meno's Paradox Again.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):233 - 256.
    The complex way Meno's paradox is presented in the Meno forces reflection on both the external conditions on inquiry—its objects—and its internal conditions—the state of mind of the person who inquires. The theory of recollection does not fully account for the internal conditions—as Plato makes clear in the critique of Meno's puzzle to be found in the Euthydemus. I conclude that in the Euthydemus Plato is inviting us to reject the externalist account of knowledge urged on Socrates by the sophists (...)
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  17. Recollecting Plato’s Meno.Luca Castagnoli - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):413-418.
  18. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  19. Knowledge, Recollection, and the Forms in Republic VII.Michael T. Ferejohn - 2006 - In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell. pp. 214--233.
  20. The Mythical Introduction of Recollection in the Meno (81A5–E2).Cristina Ionescu - 2006 - Journal of Philosophical Research 31:153-170.
    This essay explores the relevance of Socrates’ mythical introduction of recollection in the Meno. I argue that the passage at 81a5–e2 addresses different levels of understanding, a superficial and a deeper one, corresponding to a literal and a metaphorical reading respectively. The major themes addressed in this passage—the immortality of the soul, transmigration, rewards and punishments in the after-life, Hades, the kinship of all nature and anamnesis—have distinct meanings depending on whether we approach them with a Platonic or an Orphico-Pythagorean (...)
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  21. Platonic Recollection and Mental Pregnancy.Glenn Rawson - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):137-155.
    : Plato's founding position in the tradition of epistemological nativism has been underestimated. In addition to his notorious, naively non-dispositional model of learning as recollection, Plato offers several neglected dispositional models of innate ideas, including Diotima's model of mental pregnancy in the Symposium, in which maturing mental embryos begin not with the actual content of the knowledge to be acquired, but with a specific potentiality that must be actualized through series of specific kinds of experience and mental activity. A survey (...)
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  22. Xii &Ast;—Form–Particular Resemblance in Plato's Phaedo.David Sedley - 2006 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):311-327.
    This paper is a critical re-examination of the argument in Plato's "Phaedo" for the thesis that all learning is recollection of prenatal knowledge. Plato's speaker Socrates concentrates on the case of 'equal sticks and stones', viewed as striving without complete success to resemble a Form, the Equal itself. The paper argues that (a) this is a rather special case, focused on geometry; (b) Plato is at pains to emphasize that the Form-particular relation need not be one of resemblance at all, (...)
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  23. Recollection and Philosophical Reflection in Plato's Phaedo.Lee Franklin - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (4):289-314.
    Interpretations of recollection in the "Phaedo" are divided between ordinary interpretations, on which recollection explains a kind of learning accomplished by all, and sophisticated interpretations, which restrict recollection to philosophers. A sophisticated interpretation is supported by the prominence of philosophical understanding and reflection in the argument. Recollection is supposed to explain the advanced understanding displayed by Socrates and Simmias (74b2-4). Furthermore, it seems to be a necessary condition on recollection that one who recollects also perform a comparison of sensible particulars (...)
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  24. The Tale is Not My Own (Οὐκ Ἐμòς Ὁ Μυ̑θος): Myth and Recollection in Plato.Max Latona - 2004 - Apeiron 37 (3):181 - 210.
  25. Two Aspects of Platonic Recollection.Thomas Williams - 2002 - Apeiron 35 (2):131 - 152.
    Notwithstanding considerable disagreement over certain details, writers on Plato’s theory of recollection are broadly in agreement regarding some of the main features. Setting aside for the moment those who doubt that Plato ever held any considered doctrine so well‐developed as to constitute a theory of recollection at all, we can find a substantial scholarly consensus in favor of the following account: In the Phaedo Plato argues that all human beings recollect the Forms. Such recollection is meant to account for the (...)
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  26. Recollection in the Phaedo.Sean Kelsey - 2000 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):91-121.
  27. The Recollection Argument Revisited.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1999 - Apeiron 32 (4):1 - 15.
  28. Knowledge and Being in the Recollection Argument.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1999 - Apeiron 32 (4):1-16.
  29. Platonic Recollection.Dominic Scott - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
  30. Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. D Scott.M. Wright - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (2):349-350.
  31. The Platonic Recollection of the Body: Plato's Erotic Legacy.Richard Findler - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (2):344-349.
  32. Recollection and Self-Understanding in the Phaedo1.I. N. Robins - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):438-.
    Socrates' account of recollection in the Phaedo has been the subject of much study, but little attention has been paid to the questions whether and how far his arguments address Simmias' claim that he needs to recollect and be reminded that learning is recollection . I shall argue that Socrates reminds Simmias by appealing to Simmias' experience of question-and-answer discussion in order to show him how in these discussions they are regaining forgotten knowledge, but have not yet completed this process.
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  33. Perceiving Particulars and Recollecting the Forms in the 'Phaedo'.Catherine Osborne - 1995 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:211 - 233.
    I ask whether the Recollection argument commits Socrates to the view that our only source of knowledge of the Forms is sense perception. I argue that Socrates does not confine our presently available sources of knowledge to empirically based recollection, but that he does think that we can't begin to move towards a philosophical understanding of the Forms except as a result of puzzles prompted by the shortfall of particulars in relation to the Forms, and hence that our awareness of (...)
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  34. XI—Perceiving Particulars and Recollecting the Forms in thePhaedo.Catherine Osborne - 1995 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95 (1):211-234.
    I ask whether the Recollection argument commits Socrates to the view that our only source of knowledge of the Forms is sense perception. I argue that Socrates does not confine our presently available sources of knowledge to empirically based recollection, but that he does think that we can't begin to move towards a philosophical understanding of the Forms except as a result of puzzles prompted by the shortfall of particulars in relation to the Forms, and hence that our awareness of (...)
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  35. Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and Its Successors.Dominic Scott - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book examines these theories of learning in relation to each other. It presents (...)
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  36. The Paradox of the Meno and Plato’s Theory of Recollection.Oded Balaban - 1994 - Semiotica 98 (3-4):265-276.
  37. Recollection and the Problem of the Elenchus.Jyl Gentzler - 1994 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):257-295.
    We simply cannot make sense of Socrates' procedure for cross-examining his interlocutors in the early dialogues if we insist that Socrates uses cross-examination only for the purpose of testing his interlocutor's claim to knowledge. This view of Socratic cross-examination cannot explain the fact that Socrates examines theses that he himself proposes and that neither he nor his interlocutor explicitly endorses. In contrast,the supposition that Socrates is inquiring on these occasions provides a good explanation for his procedure. When one is attempting (...)
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  38. The Masks of Dionysus: A Commentary on Plato's Symposium. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Pender & D. Anderson - 1993 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:206-207.
    The metaphysical center of Plato’s work has traditionally been taken to be his Doctrine of Forms; the epistemological center, the Doctrine of Recollection. The Symposium has been viewed as one of the clearest explanations of the first and Meno as one of the clearest explanations of the other. The Masks of Dionysos challenges these traditional interpretations.
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  39. Sense-Experience and the Argument for Recollection in Plato’s Phaedo.J. T. Bedu-Addo - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (1):27 - 60.
  40. Sense‐Experience and the Argument for Recollection in Plato's Phaedo. Bedu‐Addo - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (1):27-60.
  41. The Present and the Past a Study of Anamnesis.Richard J. Ginn - 1989 - Wipf and Stock Publishers.
  42. Love and Recollection in Plato’s Phaedo.Donald C. Lindenmuth - 1988 - Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):11-18.
  43. Platonic Anamnesis Revisited.Dominic Scott - 1987 - Classical Quarterly 37 (2):346-366.
    The belief in innate knowledge has a history almost as long as that of philosophy itself. In our own century it has been propounded in a linguistic context by Chomsky, who sees himself as the heir to a tradition including such philosophers as Descartes, the Cambridge Platonists and Leibniz. But the ancestor of all these is, of course, Plato's theory of recollection or anamnesis. This stands out as unique among all other innatist theses not simply because it was the first, (...)
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  44. Recollection and the Argument ‘From a Hypothesis’ in Plato's Meno.J. T. Bedu-Addo - 1984 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:1-14.
  45. The Divided and the Doctrine of Recollection in Plato.Richard Mohr - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (1):34.
  46. The Divided Line and the Doctrine of Recollection in Plato.Richard Mohr - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (1):34 - 41.
  47. Sense-Perception and Recollection in the Phaedo.Michael L. Morgan - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (3):237-251.
  48. Domains of Recollection.Alan D. Baddeley - 1982 - Psychological Review 89 (6):708-729.
  49. Recollection as Realization: Remythologizing Plato.Mary F. Rousseau - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):337 - 348.
    SEARCHING and learning... are altogether recollection". A long and strong tradition in Platonic studies has taken this statement as a literal description of what happens when we come to know something that we had not known before. That literal interpretation is commonly linked to a similarly literal interpretation of Plato's statements about the soul's cycle of rebirths, and to a transcendent rather than a transcendental view of the Ideas, one which gives them an ontological status separate from sensible particulars. Sensibles (...)
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  50. Maharishi, Plato and the Tm‐Sidhi Program on Innate Structures of Consciousness.Jonathan Shear - 1981 - Metaphilosophy 12 (1):72-84.
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