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  1. Reading Plato's Dialogues to Enhance Learning and Inquiry: Exploring Socrates' Use of Protreptic for Student Engagement.Mason Marshall - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    Along with fresh interpretations of Plato, this book proposes a radically new approach to reading him, one that can teach us about protreptic, as it is called, by reimagining the ways in which Socrates engages in it. Protreptic, as it is conceived in the book, is an attempt to bring about a fundamental change of heart in people so that they want truth more than anything else. In taking the approach developed in this book, one doesn't try to get Plato (...)
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  2. Why Socrates’ Legs Didn’t Run Off to Megara.Ellisif Wasmuth - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):380-413.
    I argue that the arguments presented in Socrates’ dialogue with the personified Laws of the Crito are arguments Socrates endorses and relies upon when deciding to remain in prison. They do not, however, entail blind obedience to every court verdict, nor do they provide necessary and sufficient conditions for resolving every dilemma of civil disobedience. Indeed, lacking definitional knowledge of justice, we should not expect Socrates to be able to offer such conditions. Instead, the Laws present an argument that is (...)
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  3. What Rules and Laws does Socrates Obey.David Lévystone - 2019 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 57:57-75.
    Socrates ́ thought of justice and obedience to laws is moti- vated by a will to avoid the destructive effects of Sophistic criti- cisms and theories of laws. He thus requires–against theories of natural law–an almost absolute obedience to the law, as far as this law respects the legal system of the city. But, against legal positivism, Socrates would not admit that a law is just simply because it is a law: he is looking for the true Just. However, as (...)
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  4. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  5. Reason, law, and authority in plato's crito.Mark Brouwer - 2015 - Auslegung 31 (1):19-46.
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  6. Because I Said So: Practical Authority in Plato’s Crito.Micah Lott - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):3-31.
    This essay is an analysis of the central arguments in Plato’s Crito. The dialogue shows, in a variety of ways, that the opinion of another person can have practical relevance in one’s deliberations about what to do – e.g. as an argument, as a piece of expert advice, as a threat. Especially important among these forms of practical relevance is the relevance of authoritative commands. In the dialogue, the Laws of Athens argue that Socrates must accept his sentence of death, (...)
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  7. Ωσπερ οι κορyβαντιωντεσ: The corybantic rites in Plato's dialogues.Ellisif Wasmuth - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (1):69-84.
    Plato makes explicit references to Corybantic rites in six of his dialogues, spanning from the so-called early Crito to the later Laws. In all but one of these an analogy is established between aspects of the Corybantic rites and some kind of λόγος: the words of the poets in the Ion, Lysias' speech in the Phaedrus, and the arguments of Euthydemus and Dionysodorus, the personified Laws and Socrates in the Euthydemus, Crito and Symposium respectively. Plato's use of Corybantic analogies is (...)
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  8. Socrates and the Gods [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):204-207.
  9. Principles, dialectic and the common world of friendship: Socrates and Crito in conversation.Kieran Bonner - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (2):3-25.
    In the Crito, a dialogue that is highly influential for the traditions both of philosophy and of political thinking, Socrates resists the pleading of his friend Crito to escape the city that has condemned him. For Arendt, the dialogue instantiates the separation between humans as thinking beings and humans as acting beings, and so between political theory and philosophy. For others, the dialogue shows Socrates’ reasoning to be self-contradictory. Socrates’ introduction of the Athenian Laws as a world of greater moral (...)
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  10. Reason and the Rhetoric of Legal Obligation in Plato’s Crito.Paul J. Diduch - 2014 - Polis 31 (1):1-27.
    This paper examines Crito’s motives for wanting to help Socrates escape, and Socrates’ rhetorical strategy for handling Crito’s concerns, particularly Crito’s fear of the many. It concludes that Socrates’ admitted concern for his reputation provides the only adequate explanation for his obedience to the court, an explanation which does not rely on his explicit arguments for obligation, but which helps explain why he is concerned to come to the law’s defence. Joining others in suggesting that Socrates’ case for obligation be (...)
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  11. Crito's failure to deliberate socratically.Antony Hatzistavrou - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):580-594.
    In comparison to the speech of the Laws, the dialectic between Crito and Socrates at the beginning of theCritohas received little attention. In this paper I argue that it contains an important philosophical message. It illustrates that the many's failure to follow Socrates' principles, like his principle of non-retaliation, is due to the intrinsic fragility of true beliefs. Though the many can understand Socrates' values and may accept his principles if he argues with them long enough, they may fail to (...)
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  12. Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato.Necip Fikri Alican - 2012 - Amsterdam and New York: Brill | Rodopi.
    This book is a quest for the real Plato, forever hiding behind the veil of drama. The quest, as the subtitle indicates, is Cartesian in that it looks for Plato independently of the prevailing paradigms on where we are supposed to find him. The result of the quest is a complete pedagogical platform on Plato. This does not mean that the book leaves nothing out, covering all the dialogues and all the themes, but that it provides the full intellectual apparatus (...)
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  13. Plato’s Crito On the Nature of Persuasion and Obedience.Eugene Garver - 2012 - Polis 29 (1):1-20.
    The Crito dramatizes the impossibility, and the indispensability, of persuasion sby locating it between two extremes, Socrates and the Laws, the truths of philosophy and the force of politics. The question is whether those two limits are themselves inside or outside rhetoric. Can philosophy persuade, ormust it always be an alternative sto persuasion? Socrates insists on ignoring the opinion, and the power, of the many, and so the Laws have to show themselves as different from the opinion of the many (...)
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  14. Fair Play: Resolving the Crito - Apology Problem.Jonathan Hecht - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (4):543-564.
    Most interpretations of the Crito, such as the absolute obligation view and the civil disobedience view, are thought to be grounded largely in an obligation of gratitude. I present arguments for why these interpretations are not viable, and then propose an alternative solution; this alternative is the obligation of fair play. While the obligation of fair play has been discussed before in relation to the Crito, this is the first full account of the position. The fair play interpretation both precludes (...)
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  15. Crito and Critique.Alan Kim - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:67-113.
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  16. Socratic Persuasion in the Crito.Christopher Moore - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1021 - 1046.
    Socrates does not use the Laws' Speech in the Crito principally to persuade Crito to accept his coming execution. It is used instead to persuade Crito to examine and work on his inadequate view of justice. Crito's view of justice fails to coordinate one's duties to friends and those to the law. The Laws' Speech accomplishes this persuasive goal by accompanying Crito?s earlier speech. Both start from the same view of justice, one that Crito accepts, but reach opposing conclusions. Crito (...)
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  17. Well-Being and Revisionism: From Platoʼs Crito to Krautʼs What is Good and Why.Yuval Eylon - 2009 - Iyyun 58:251-259.
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  18. Crito. Plato - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  19. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  20. Lessons From The Crito.Kyle Scott - 2009 - Polis 26 (1):31-51.
    On the question of civil disobedience the Crito seems out of step with what Socrates says on the matter in other dialogues. This paper argues that Socrates does not abandon his earlier preference for philosophy over the law by choosing to stay and die, but rather, it is because of his preference for philosophy and the philosophic way of life that he ends up not escaping. This paper reaches its conclusion by showing that the argument of the Laws is unpersuasive (...)
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  21. Dialectic in action: An examination of Plato's crito. By Michael C. Stokes: Book reviews. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):510-510.
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  22. Defence of Socrates, Euthyphro, Crito.David Gallop (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    These new translations of the Defence of Socrates, the Euthyphro, and the Crito present Plato's remarkable dramatizations of the momentous events surrounding the trial of Socrates in 399 BC, on charges of irreligion and corrupting the young. They form a dramatic and thematic sequence, raising fundamental questions about the basis of moral, religious, legal, and political obligation. The introduction provides a stimulating philosophical and historical analysis of these texts, complemented by useful explanatory notes and an index of names.
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  23. The Crito (M.C.) Stokes Dialectic in Action. An Examination of Plato's Crito. Pp. x + 246. Swansea: The Classical Press of Wales, 2005. Cased, £45. ISBN: 9780-9543845-9-. [REVIEW]Verity Harte - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):372-.
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  24. The Crito's Integrity.Matthew R. Dasti - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (2):123 - 140.
  25. Plato on homeric justice in apology and crito.Edward J. Grippe - 2007 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (2):11-29.
    This essay relates Plato’s views on Homeric justice in the Apology and Crito to current domestic and foreign policy. Applying the insights of these dialogues to contemporary issues of war and civil liberties, the essay contends that the separation of time and the foreignness of culture may aid our decisionmaking if we take the time to consider the lessons offered to us across the centuries. Plato assists in this bridging process through the literary device of the dialogue. The dialogues provide (...)
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  26. Socrates and Superiority.Nathan Hanna - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):251-268.
    I propose an alternative interpretation of the Crito. The arguments that are typically taken to be Socrates’ primary arguments against escape are actually supplementary arguments that rely on what I call the Superiority Thesis, the thesis that the state and its citizens are members of a moral hierarchy where those below are tied by bonds of obligation to those above. I provide evidence that Socrates holds this thesis, demonstrate how it resolves a number of apparent difficulties and show why my (...)
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  27. Crito and the Socratic Controversy.Gabriel Danzig - 2006 - Polis 23 (1):21-45.
    Crito was written in response to popular slanders concerning Socrates' failure to escape from prison, and accompanying misgivings within the Socratic circle. Plato responds by asking his audience to disregard the slander of the mob and obey the moral expert instead. But he also responds by creating an image of Socrates and his friends widely at odds with the popular slander; by implying that Socrates' critics were themselves guilty of some of the behaviour they charged against Socrates; by pointing out (...)
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  28. Plato's Crito On the Obligation to Obey the Law.Charles M. Young - 2006 - Philosophical Inquiry 28 (1-2):79-90.
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  29. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):714-718.
  30. Wisdom and the Laws: The Parent Analogy in Plato’s Crito.Sandrine Berges - 2004 - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 3.
    One noticeable omission in the otherwise ever flourishing literature on Plato's Crito is the recognition that Plato is presenting a problem from a virtue ethical angle. This is no doubt due to the fact that Aristotle, rather than Plato is regarded as the originator of Virtue Ethics as a branch of philosophy.1 Plato's own contribution to the discipline is more often than not bypassed.2 This has unfortunate consequences not only for Platonic scholarship, but also for the study of Virtue Ethics. (...)
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  31. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2004 - Routledge.
    Plato is the most important philosopher in the history of Western philosophy. This guidebook introduces and examines his three dialogues that deal with the death of Socrates: Euthphryo , Apology and Crito . These dialogues are widely regarded as the closest exposition of Socrates' ideas. Plato and the Trial of Socrates introduces and assesses: * Plato's life and the background to the three dialogues * The ideas and text in the three dialogues * Plato's continuing importance to philosophy Plato and (...)
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  32. The Elenctic Speech of the Laws in Plato’s Crito.Robert Metcalf - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):37-65.
  33. Towards a Prudential Reading of the Crito.Terry Penner - 2004 - In V. Karamanlis (ed.), Socrates: 2400 years since his death: International Symposium Proceedings. pp. 13-21.
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  34. Socrates, Crito, and their Debt to Asclepius.Mark L. Mcpherran - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):71-92.
  35. Socrates and παιδεία in the "Crito".Paul Neufeld - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (2):115 - 141.
  36. Socrates and paideia in Crito.Paul Neufeld - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (2):115-142.
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  37. The Roots of Socratic Philanthropy and The Rule Of Law: Plato’s Crito.Martin J. Plax - 2001 - Polis 18 (1-2):59-89.
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  38. Plato: Crito. [REVIEW]V. A. Rodgers - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (1):161-161.
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  39. C. Emlyn-Jones: Plato: Crito. Pp. ix + 106. Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1999. Paper, £12.95. ISBN: 1-85399-469-. [REVIEW]V. A. Rodgers - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (01):161-.
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  40. C. Emlyn-Jones: Plato: Crito. Pp. ix + 106. Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1999. Paper, £12.95. ISBN: 1-85399-469-3.V. A. Rodgers - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (1):161-161.
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  41. Crito's Reasoning: Plato's Commentary on Athenian Justice.D. W. Goldberg - 2000 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 11.
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  42. Crito in Plato’s Euthydemus: The Lover of Family and of Money.Martin J. Plax - 2000 - Polis 17 (1-2):35-59.
    If Platonic dialogues are dramas, then Socrates' interlocutors can be understood in their full humanity rather than foils for Socrates. This essay examines Crito, not as he appears in the dialogue named after him, but in the Euthydemus, where he reveals himself to a much greater degree. Here Crito is revealed as a successful businessman, a lover of money, who also has protective feelings about his son Critobolus. The physical frailty is a cause of concern. By understanding Crito in these (...)
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  43. Political Organicism in the Crito.Phillip Goggans - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):217-233.
  44. Review. Socrates Dissatisfied. An analysis of Plato's Crito. R Weiss.Martin McAvoy - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):436-437.
  45. Platonic Mimesis.Mitchell Miller - 1999 - In Thomas Falkner, Nancy Felson & David Konstan (eds.), Contextualizing Classics: Ideology, Performance, Dialogue. pp. 253-266.
    A two-fold study, on the one hand of the thought-provoking mimesis by which Plato gives his hearer an occasion for self-knowledge and self-transcendence and of the typical sequential structure, an appropriation of the trajectory of the poem of Parmenides, by which Plato orders the drama of inquiry, and on the other hand a commentary on the Crito that aims to show concretely how these elements — mimesis and Parmenidean structure — work together to give the dialogues their exceptional elicitative power.
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  46. taking Crito seriously.M. Plax - 1999 - Polis 16 (1-2):86-92.
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  47. Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito.Mark L. McPherran - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):620-621.
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  48. " A Creature of Modern Scholarship": Disobedience and the Crito Problem.F. Rosen - 1998 - Polis 15 (1-2):1-12.
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  49. Socrates Dissatisfied: An Analysis of Plato's Crito.Roslyn Weiss - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Socrates Dissatisfied, Weiss argues against the prevailing view that the personified Laws in the latter part of the Crito are Socrates' spokesmen. She reveals and explores many indications that Socrates and the Laws are, both in style and in substance, adversaries. Deft, provocative, and compelling, with new translations providing groundbreaking interpretations of key passages, Socrates Dissatisfied challenges the standard conception of the history of political thought.
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  50. Plato's' Apologia'and'Crito'-Reflections and objections.M. Montuori - 1997 - Filosofia 48 (2).
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