This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

76 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 76
  1. On Socrates' Project of Philosophical Conversion.Jacob Stump - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (32):1-19.
    There is a wide consensus among scholars that Plato’s Socrates is wrong to trust in reason and argument as capable of converting people to the life of philosophy. In this paper, I argue for the opposite. I show that Socrates employs a more sophisticated strategy than is typically supposed. Its key component is the use of philosophical argument not to lead an interlocutor to rationally conclude that he must change his way of life but rather to cause a certain affective (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Pleasure, Pain, and the Unity of Soul in Plato's Protagoras.Vanessa de Harven & Wolfgang-Rainer Mann - 2018 - In William V. Harris (ed.), Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times. pp. 111-138.
  3. Rational Pleasures. J. Warren the Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. Pp. XII + 234. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £60, Us$95. Isbn: 978-1-107-02544-8. [REVIEW]Kelly E. Arenson - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):60-62.
  4. Poetry and Hedonic Error in Plato’s Republic.J. Clerk Shaw - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):373-396.
    This paper reads Republic 583b-608b as a single, continuous line of argument. First, Socrates distinguishes real from apparent pleasure and argues that justice is more pleasant than injustice. Next, he describes how pleasures nourish the soul. This line of argument continues into the second discussion of poetry: tragic pleasures are mixed pleasures in the soul that seem greater than they are; indulging them nourishes appetite and corrupts the soul. The paper argues that Plato has a novel account of the ‘paradox (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. A relação entre a Alma e o Cuidado de Si no Alcibíades I de Platão.Luiz Felipe da Silva Carvalho - 2015 - Dissertation, UFF, Brazil
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the "Protagoras", Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the "Protagoras" as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be taught. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. Courage and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato’s Republic.Josh Wilburn - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    In this paper I examine the account of courage offered in Books 3 and 4 of the Republic and consider its relation to the account of courage and cowardice found in the final argument of the Protagoras. I defend two main lines of thought. The first is that in the Republic Plato does not abandon the Protagoras’ view that all cases of cowardice involve mistaken judgment or ignorance about what is fearful. Rather, he continues to treat cowardly behavior as an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Erōs Tyrannos: Philosophical Passion and Psychic Ordering in the Republic.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - In Noburo Notomi & Luc Brisson (eds.), Dialogues on Plato's Politeia (Republic): Selected Papers from the IX Symposium Platonicum. pp. 188-193.
    In this paper, I explore parallels between philosophical and tyrannical eros in Plato's Republic. I argue that in arguing that reason experiences eros for the forms, Plato introduces significant tensions into his moral psychology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Via Platonica zum Unbewussten. Platon und Freud (pdf: Inhaltszerzeichnis, Vegetti Vorwort, Einleitung).Marco Solinas - 2012 - Turia + Kant.
    Solinas’ Studie untersucht den Einfluss von Platons Anschauungen von Traum, Wunsch und Wahn auf den jungen Freud. Anhand der Untersuchung einiger zeitgenössischer kulturwissenschaftlicher Arbeiten, die bereits in die ersten Ausgabe der Traumdeutung Eingang fanden, wird Freuds nachhaltige Vertrautheit mit den platonischen Lehren erläutert und seine damit einhergehende direkte Textkenntnis der thematisch relevanten Stellen aus Platons Staat aufgezeigt. Die strukturelle Analogie von Freud’schem und platonischem Seelenbegriff wird inhaltlich am Traum als »Königsweg zum Unbewussten«, in dem von Freud selbst angesprochenen Verhältnis von (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Pleasure as Genesis in Plato’s Philebus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):73-94.
    Socrates’ claim that pleasure is a γένεσις unifies the Philebus’ conception of pleasure. Close examination of the passage reveals an emphasis on metaphysical-normative dependency in γένεσις. Seeds for such an emphasis were sown in the dialogue’s earlier discussion of μεικτά, thus linking the γένεσις claim to Philebus’ description of pleasure as ἄπειρον. False pleasures illustrate the radical dependency of pleasure on outside determinants. I end tying together the Philebus’ three descriptions of pleasure: restoration, indefinite, and γένεσις.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12. Pleasure Unlimited: Philebus and the Drama of the Unlimited.John Kress - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):13-34.
    The Philebus is a difficult dialogue, often criticized for treating obscure ontological questions while neglecting the dramatic aspect characteristic of the Platonic dialogue. In this paper, I argue that, while subtle, the dramatic dimension is essential in understanding the ontological inquiries pursued and the dialogue as a whole. I argue that the Philebus should be read as an agon, a dramatic contest, between Socrates, the advocate of nous, and Philebus, the silent advocate of hēdonē. I show that this contest about (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. “Diagnostic Hedonism” and the Role of Incommensurability in Plato’s Protagoras.Tea Logar - 2010 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):241-257.
    The dispute over Socrates’ apparent endorsement of hedonism in the Protagoras has persisted for ages among scholars and students of Plato’s work. The solution to the query concerning the seriousness and sincerity of Socrates’ argument from hedonism established in the dialogue is of considerable importance for the interpretation of Plato’s overall moral theory, considering how blatantly irreconcilable the defense of this doctrine is with Plato’s other early dialogues. In his earlier works, Socrates puts supreme importance on virtue and perfection of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Fleeing the Divine: Plato's Rejection of the Ahedonic Ideal in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - In John Dillon & Brisson Luc (eds.), Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. pp. 209-214.
    Note: "Next to Godliness" (Apeiron) is an expanded version of this paper. -/- According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras.Panos Dimas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
  16. Plato on the Possibility of Hedonic Mistakes.Matthew Evans - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 35:89-124.
  17. Plato's Anti-Hedonism'.Matthew Evans - 2008 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):121-145.
  18. Hybrid Varieties of Pleasure and the Complex Case of the Pleasures of Learning in Plato's Philebus.Cristina Ionescu - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (3-4):439-461.
    ABSTRACT: This article addresses two main concerns: first, the relation between the truth/falsehood and purity/impurity criteria as applied to pleasure, and, second, the status of our pleasures of learning. In addressing the first, I argue that Plato keeps the truth/falsehood and purity/impurity criteria distinct in his assessment of pleasures and thus leaves room for the possibility of hybrid pleasures in the form of true impure pleasures and false pure pleasures. In addressing the second issue, I show that Plato's view is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. Plato’s Understanding of Pleasure in the Philebus: Absolute Standards of Repletion and the Mean.Cristina Ionescu - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Research 33:1-18.
    Plato’s definition of pleasure as perceptible replenishment of a lack has been criticized as too narrow and incapable of accounting for some of the corporeal and all the non-corporeal pleasures. Plato’s suggested reply, based on objective standards in relation to which we are to estimate the reality and degree of replenishment we experience, seems to give rise to another difficulty, concerning the legitimate diversity of our natural inclinations and tastes. I argue that Plato’sdefinition of pleasure makes perfect sense when integrated (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Daniel Russell, Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]Nickolas Pappas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):227-232.
  21. Review: Daniel Russell: Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]N. Reshotko - 2008 - Mind 117 (465):218-223.
  22. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Review of Daniel Russell, Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. [REVIEW]Sylvain Delcomminette - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (01):40-41.
  24. Plato and the Meaning of Pain.Matthew Evans - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (1):71 - 93.
    Most readers of ancient Greek psychology will agree that the Philebus is where we find Plato’s best attempt to theorize about bodily pain.1 But they will probably also agree that the account he develops there has no real chance of being true, and so should not have much appeal to us today — at least insofar as we are philosophers rather than historians. It’s this second conviction that I want to challenge in what follows. More specifically, I want to argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  25. Plato's Rejection of Thoughtless and Pleasureless Lives.Matthew Evans - 2007 - Phronesis 52 (4):337 - 363.
    In the Philebus Plato argues that every rational human being, given the choice, will prefer a life that is moderately thoughtful and moderately pleasant to a life that is utterly thoughtless or utterly pleasureless. This is true, he thinks, even if the thoughtless life at issue is intensely pleasant and the pleasureless life at issue is intensely thoughtful. Evidently Plato wants this argument to show that neither pleasure nor thought, taken by itself, is sufficient to make a life choiceworthy for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26. The Argument of the Philebus.Joe Mccoy - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1-16.
    This essay explores Socrates’ argumentative strategy in the Philebus, which is a response to the view that pleasure is the good. Socrates leads his interlocutorsthrough a series of steps in order to demonstrate to them the “conditions and dispositions of soul” upon which hedonism rests. Socrates’ aim is not to refute the claim that pleasure is a good, but rather to show the dependence of the experience of pleasure on intellect and the other elements of the life of mind. In (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Doctor and the Pastry Chef: Pleasure and Persuasion in Plato’s Gorgias.Jessica Moss - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):229 - 249.
  28. Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Richard D. Parry - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):688-689.
  29. La sublimazione dell'eros. La "Repubblica" e Freud.Marco Solinas - 2007 - Chronos 25 (1):69-92.
  30. Hedonistic Persons. The Good Man Argument in Plato's Philebus.Amber Danielle Carpenter - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):5 – 26.
  31. Plato on a Mistake About Pleasure.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):447-468.
    Plato argues in Republic IX that people are often mistaken about their own pleasures and pains. One of the mistakes he focuses on isjudging that an experience of ours is pleasant when, in fact, it is not. The view that such a mistake is possible is an unpopular one, andscholars have generally been dismissive of Plato’s position. Thus Urmson argues not only that this position is deeply flawed, but alsothat it results from a confusion on Plato’s part. In this paper, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Gary M. Gurtler - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (4):504-506.
  33. Pleasure and Illusion in Plato.Jessica Moss - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):503 - 535.
    Plato links pleasure with illusion, and this link explains his rejection of the view that all desires are rational desires for the good. The Protagoras and Gorgias show connections between pleasure and illusion; the Republic develops these into a psychological theory. One part of the soul is not only prone to illusions, but also incapable of the kind of reasoning that can dispel them. Pleasure appears good; therefore this part of the soul (the appetitive part) desires pleasures qua good but (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  34. Las Ambigüedades Del Placer. Ensayo Sobre El Placer En la Filosofía de Platón.George Rudebusch - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):192-196.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Two Chariots: The Justification of the Best Life in the "Katha Upanishad" and Plato's "Phaedrus".Elizabeth Ann Schiltz - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (3):451-468.
    The philosophical import of the chariot images found in the Katha Upanishad and the Phaedrus is considered here. It is claimed that the resemblance in the accounts provided in these disparate texts is not merely incidental. Rather, each chariot-image should be read as contributing to a careful answer to the same thorny philosophical problem: the identification and justification of the best life for the individual. It is argued that each serves to illuminate an internal and complex account of the self, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Virtue and Pleasure in Plato's "Laws".John Mouracade - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (1):73 - 85.
  37. Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Daniel Russell - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Daniel Russell develops a fresh and original view of pleasure and its pivotal role in Plato's treatment of value, happiness, and human psychology. This is the first full-length discussion of the topic for fifty years, and Russell shows its relevance to contemporary debates in moral philosophy and philosophical psychology. Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life will make fascinating reading for ancient specialists and for a wide range of philosophers.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  38. Desideri: fenomenologia degenerativa e strategie di controllo.Marco Solinas - 2005 - In Mario Vegetti (ed.), Platone. La Repubblica. Bibliopolis. pp. vol. VI, 471-498.
  39. Pleasure and the Levels Analogy: An Exegetical Note on Republic 584d–585a.James Butler - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (02):614-618.
  40. The Place of Hedonism in Plato’s Laws.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):283-300.
  41. Plato on False Pains and Modern Cognitive Science.George Couvalis & Matthew Usher - 2003 - Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):99-115.
  42. False Pleasures, Appearance and Imagination in the Philebus.Sylvain Delcomminette - 2003 - Phronesis 48 (3):215-237.
    This paper examines the discussion about false pleasures in the "Philebus" (36 c3-44 a11). After stressing the crucial importance of this discussion in the economy of the dialogue, it attempts to identify the problematic locus of the possibility of true or false pleasures. Socrates points to it by means of an analogy between pleasure and doxa. Against traditional interpretations, which reduce the distinction drawn in this passage to a distinction between doxa and pleasure on the one hand and their object (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43. Plato's Pleasures.Jeff Mason - 2003 - The Philosophers' Magazine 23:19-20.
    Jeff Mason looks at what Plato had to say about love and desire.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Pleasure, Virtue, Externals, and Happiness in Plato's "Laws".Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2002 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 19 (4):327 - 344.
  45. A Platonic Response to Foucault’s Use of Pleasure.Benjamin Dykes - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):103-123.
  46. Mixed Pleasures, Blended Discourses: Poetry, Medicine, and the Body in Plato's Philebus 46-47c.Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):135-160.
    In Plato's Philebus the last section of the discussion on the falseness of pleasure is dedicated to those pleasures intrinsically mixed with pain. This paper focuses specifically on bodily mixed pleasures, an analysis that extends from 44d to 47c, while its focal point is 46-47c. By adopting the anti-hedonists' methodology, Socrates cunningly transforms his entire analysis of bodily mixed pleasures into a discourse on human disease, in which medical terminology prevails. Two major points are made in the reading suggested here. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Hedonism and the Pleasureless Life in Plato's Philebus.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 2000 - Phronesis 45 (4):257-283.
    This paper re-evaluates the role that Plato confers to pleasure in the "Philebus." According to leading interpretations, Plato there downplays the role of pleasure, or indeed rejects hedonism altogether. Thus, scholars such as D. Frede have taken the "mixed life" of pleasure and intelligence initially submitted in the "Philebus" to be conceded by Socrates only as a remedial good, second to a life of neutral condition, where one would experience no pleasure and pain. Even more strongly, scholars such as Irwin (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48. Plato: Pleasure and the Deficiency of the Sensible World.Fernando Muniz - 2000 - Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (2):21-30.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Protagoras and Socrates on Courage and Pleasure: Protagoras 349d Ad Finem.Daniel C. Russell - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):311-338.
  50. Socrates, Pleasure, and Value. [REVIEW]Daniel C. Russell - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (2):468-472.
1 — 50 / 76