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  1. Der Dämon und die Masse. Kritik und Verteidigung politischer Mythen bei Hans Blumenberg.Maximilian Runge - 2016
    In his recently published posthumous works "Prefiguration" and "The Rigorism of Truth" Hans Blumenberg surprisingly steps into the area of political history that he had left widely unconsidered in "Work on Myth". While "Prefiguration" tackles the “demonic” aspects of Napoleon and Hitler that Blumenberg tries to dismantle and bring into derision, in "Rigorism of Truth" he attacks Hannah Arendt's phrase of the Banality of Evil in relation to the Jerusalem trial against Adolf Eichmann in 1961. In this latter issue Blumenberg (...)
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  2. The Myth of Cronus in Plato’s Statesman: Cosmic Rotation and Earthly Correspondence.Wellesley College Corinne GartnerCorresponding authorPhilosophy - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  3. Myths of Education. I n.Robert Paul Wolff - forthcoming - Philosophy Now: An Introductory Reader. Paula R. And War, and Citizenship. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
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  4. The Ethical Function of the Gorgias' Concluding Myth.Nicholas R. Baima - 2024 - In J. Clerk Shaw (ed.), Plato's Gorgias: a critical guide. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The Gorgias ends with Socrates telling an eschatological myth that he insists is a rational account and no mere tale. Using this story, Socrates reasserts the central lessons of the previous discussion. However, it isn’t clear how this story can persuade any of the characters in the dialogue. Those (such as Socrates) who already believe the underlying philosophical lessons don’t appear to require the myth, and those (such as Callicles) who reject these teachings are unlikely to be moved by this (...)
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  5. The Thematic Significance of the Scenery in Plato’s Phaedrus.Ryan M. Brown - 2023 - Ancient Philosophy 43 (2):399-423.
    In this essay, I discuss the philosophical significance of three features of the Phaedrus’s dramatic scenery: the myth of Boreas, the two trees Socrates singles out upon arriving at the grove, and the grove itself. I argue that attention to these three features of the dramatic scenery helps us better understand the Phaedrus’s account of erōs.
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  6. A less familiar Plato: from Phaedo to Philebus.Kevin Corrigan - 2023 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Provides a guide to Plato in an unexpected key with well-grounded views of Plato's works (particularly major middle to late dialogues). The reader meets important questions of perception, embodiment, mimetic art, imagination, divine inspiration, the Forms and the Good, beauty, myth and logos, and generative epistemic art.
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  7. The Phaedo as an Alternative to Tragedy.David Ebrey - 2023 - Classical Philology 118 (2):153-171.
    This article argues that the Phaedo is written as a new sort of story of how a hero faces death; this story provides an alternative to existing tragedy, as understood by Plato. The opening of the Phaedo makes clear that two features that Plato closely associates with tragedy, pity and lamentation, are inappropriate responses to Socrates’ impending death, and that tuchē (chance) did not affect his happiness. This is the first step in the dialogue’s sustained engagement with tragedy. Tragedy for (...)
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  8. Myth, virtue and method in Plato’s Meno.Athanasia Giasoumi - 2023 - Plato Journal 24:7-19.
    This paper challenges the prevailing interpretations about the role and function of recollection in Plato’s Meno by suggesting that recollection is a cognitive process inaugurated by a myth. This process sets out the methodological and epistemological context within which two transitions are attainable: on the one hand, the methodological transition from the elenchus to the method of hypothesis, and on the other hand, the cognitive upshift from opinion(s) to knowledge. This paper argues, furthermore, that Socrates uses the myth of recollection (...)
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  9. Divine Agency and Politics in Plato’s Myth of Atlantis.George Harvey - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (3):555-576.
    This paper approaches the Critias straightforwardly as a work of political philosophy but gives greater attention to Athens’ opponent, Atlantis, whose founding, political organization, and eventual decline each offer important lessons about the aims of legislation and political life. I begin by comparing the foundation of the two cities as presented in Critias’ myth, with a special focus on the role of divine persuasion (I). I then describe the political organization of Athens and Atlantis, showing how they reflect the different (...)
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  10. Sakın Efsane Söyleme.Gökdemir İhsan - 2023 - HECE (Mitoloji Özel Sayısı):601-606.
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  11. Are Plato's Myths Philosophical?Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2023 - Think 22 (64):39-43.
    Plato is often regarded as a founding figure for Western philosophy, and specifically as the inventor of a way of doing philosophy grounded in critical, argumentative reason. This article asks whether Plato's practice of writing myths in his dialogues comes into tension with his canonical reputation. I suggest that resolving this tension may require us to revise our standing ideas about the nature of philosophy and its relationship to myth. Against interpretations that minimize the significance of Plato's myths to his (...)
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  12. Myths of Self-Transformation in Plato’s Republic.Max J. Latona - 2023 - Ancient Philosophy 43 (1):69-87.
    The four most prominent myths of Plato’s Republic oddly share a common motif, namely, the depiction of a subterranean locale to and from which individuals are depicted as traveling. This analysis offers an account of this motif that complements the themes of the “ascent” and “descent” of the philosopher, but draws more deeply upon katabasis mythology to reveal a subtext about individual transformation that enriches our understanding of justice.
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  13. Hesiodic Influence on Plato's Myth of the Cicadas.Marko Vitas - 2023 - Plato Journal 24:21-28.
    This paper argues that Hesiod's Myth of the Golden Race (Op. 109-126) influenced Plato's Myth of the Cicadas from the Phaedrus (258e-259d). Among other parallels, Hesiod's Golden Race and Plato's Cicadas have a similar diet and a similar rapport with the gods, they die in a similar way and enjoy similar benefits after death. The paper further argues that Plato used the inherent ambiguity of the Golden Age myths to draw attention to the ambiguity of the Cicadas themselves, who bring (...)
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  14. Paradigm, Logos, and Myth in Plato's Sophist and Statesman.Conor Barry - 2022 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    This book explores the uses of the term “paradigm” with respect to both logos and myth in Plato, with a focus on Sophist and Statesman. In so doing, Conor Barry argues for a unitary as opposed to a developmental conception of Plato's dialogues.
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  15. Political, All Too Political. Again on Protagoras’ Myth in Its Intellectual Context.Mauro Bonazzi - 2022 - Polis 39 (3):425-445.
    The paper argues for an analytic interpretation of Protagoras’ myth in Plato’s dialogue by showing that its goal is not so much to reconstruct the origins of civilization as to identify some essential features of humankind. Against the widespread opinion that human progress depends on the development of technai, Protagoras claims that political art is the most important one, insofar as it is the condition for the existence of society. More concretely, the emphasis on the political art also serves to (...)
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  16. Plato’s Myths.Neel Burton - 2022 - Philosophy Now 151:11-12.
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  17. The Myth of Consciousness: The Reality of Brain-Sign.Philip Clapson - 2022 - Journal of Neurophilosophy 1 (2).
    The physical sciences, as generally understood, are disciplines concerned with the characteristics and behavior of physical objects and states. What is evident about the current condition of consciousness is that: 1) It has no identified physical states; 2) There is no generally accepted vocabulary of its functioning, or its participant entities; and 3) No ‘normal science’ operative structure upon which a community of scientists agree. The reasons are that consciousness is a prescientific concept persisting because there is no adequate physicalist (...)
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  18. De Mythe van het Tanende Vertrouwen.Hugh Desmond - 2022 - Streven 2022 (December):28-36.
    De indruk overheerst dat het vertrouwen in instellingen tanende is. Toch wordt deze indruk niet altijd ondersteund door bevragingen en statistieken. Als die indruk een mythe is, dan is de echte vraag: waarom worden we dan tot deze mythe aangetrokken? In dit essay wil ik ons verlangen naar vertrouwen plaatsen in een cultuur en in een denkkader waarin vrijheid en zelfbeschikking blijven primeren, en kijken naar hoe er vandaag theoretisch wordt nagedacht over vertrouwen en publiek beleid. Het valt te betwijfelen (...)
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  19. Self-knowledge, Eros and Recollection in Plato's "Phaedrus".Athanasia Giasoumi - 2022 - Plato Journal 23:23-35.
    At the beginning of the "Phaedrus", Socrates distinguishes between two kinds of people: those who are more complex, violent and hybristic than the monster Typhon, and those who are simpler, calmer and tamer (230a). I argue that there are also two distinct types of Eros (Love) that correlate to Socrates’s two kinds of people. In the first case, lovers cannot attain recollection because their souls are disordered in the absence of self-knowledge. For the latter, the self-knowledge of self-disciplined lovers renders (...)
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  20. Glaucon Before Lachesis.Mark Piper - 2022 - Philosophy Now 151:65-66.
    A bit of fiction: the long-lost epilogue to Plato's Republic focused on the Myth of Er.
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  21. Plato’s prescription: The origin myth of media theory.Thomas Sutherland - 2022 - Media Theory 6 (2):203–232.
    Plato’s Phaedrus, perhaps his most enigmatic and structurally convoluted dialogue, could easily be said to inaugurate a pointed critique of mass media that persists to the present day. Indeed, in certain corners of media theory, the origin myth of writing furnished in the Phaedrus (in which the Egyptian god Theuth presents writing as a gift to King Thamus) has in turn come to serve as a kind of origin myth for media theory: a primaeval pharmacopoeia of media effects. And yet, (...)
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  22. Cronus Time: A Historical Study on Plato Myth.洪威 林 - 2022 - Advances in Philosophy 11 (3):345-351.
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  23. Plato’s Phaedo and “the Art of Glaucus”: Transcending the Distortions of Developmentalism.William Henry Furness Altman - 2021 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 31.
    In a 1985 article entitled “The Art of Glaukos,” Diskin Clay suggested that the enigmatic passage at the beginning of the geological myth in Phaedoreferred toRepublic10, where the soul is likened to the sea-creature Glaucus whose true nature, like the soul’s, is obscured by the distortions imposed by underwater life. Starting with a defense of Clay’s ingenious suggestion, my purpose is to compare Phaedoto Glaucus, with its true nature obscured by traditional assumptions about the order in which Plato composed his (...)
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  24. Plato’s Pragmatism: Rethinking the Relationship Between Ethics and Epistemology.Nicholas R. Baima & Tyler Paytas - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge. Edited by Tyler Paytas.
    Plato’s Pragmatism offers the first comprehensive defense of a pragmatist reading of Plato. According to Plato, the ultimate rational goal is not to accumulate knowledge and avoid falsehood but rather to live an excellent human life. The book contends that a pragmatic outlook is present throughout the Platonic corpus. The authors argue that the successful pursuit of a good life requires cultivating certain ethical commitments, and that maintaining these commitments often requires violating epistemic norms. In the course of defending the (...)
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  25. Soul-Leading in Plato's Phaedrus and the Iconic Character of Being.Ryan M. Brown - 2021 - Dissertation, Boston College
    Since antiquity, scholars have observed a structural tension within Plato’s Phaedrus. The dialogue demands order in every linguistic composition, yet it presents itself as a disordered composition. Accordingly, one of the key problems of the Phaedrus is determining which—if any—aspect of the dialogue can supply a unifying thread for the dialogue’s major themes (love, rhetoric, writing, myth, philosophy, etc.). My dissertation argues that “soul-leading” (psuchagōgia)—a rare and ambiguous term used to define the innate power of words—resolves the dialogue’s structural tension. (...)
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  26. El Plato’s Protagoras on Who We Are?Irina Deretić - 2021 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 31.
    In Protagoras’ so called Great Speach, in Plato’s dialogue named after him, the Greek philosopher attributes the sophist a myth about the origin, development and nature of human beings, which has philosophical relevance. It is said that the gods created the mortal beings out of two elements, earth and fire. They assigned two titans, Epimetheus and Prometheus, to provide mortals with their faculties. Do this implies that creation had not been finished by the gods? To what extent do the gods (...)
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  27. Plato’s Protagoras on Who we Are?Irina Dereti´C. - 2021 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 31.
    In Protagoras’ so called Great Speach, in Plato’s dialogue named after him, the Greek philosopher attributes the sophist a myth about the origin, development and nature of human beings, which has philosophical relevance. It is said that the gods created the mortal beings out of two elements, earth and fire. They assigned two titans, Epimetheus and Prometheus, to provide mortals with their faculties. Do this implies that creation had not been finished by the gods? To what extent do the gods (...)
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  28. Plato's Statesman: a philosophical discussion.Panagiotis Dimas, M. S. Lane & Susan Sauvé Meyer (eds.) - 2021 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    "Plato's Statesman reconsiders many questions familiar to readers of the Republic: questions in political theory - such as the qualifications for the leadership of a state and the best from of constitution (politeia) - as well as questions of philosophical methodology and epistemology. Instead of the theory of Forms that is the centrepiece of the epistemology of the Republic, the emphasis here is on the dialectical practice of collection and division (diairesis), in whose service the interlocutors also deploy the ancillary (...)
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  29. Plato’s Statesman: a Philosophical Discussion.Panos Dimas, Melissa Lane & Susan Sauvé Meyer (eds.) - 2021 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    "Plato's Statesman reconsiders many questions familiar to readers of the Republic: questions in political theory - such as the qualifications for the leadership of a state and the best from of constitution (politeia) - as well as questions of philosophical methodology and epistemology. Instead of the theory of Forms that is the centrepiece of the epistemology of the Republic, the emphasis here is on the dialectical practice of collection and division (diairesis), in whose service the interlocutors also deploy the ancillary (...)
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  30. Platonische Mythen - Was sie sind und was sie nicht sind - Von A wie Atlantis bis Z wie Zamolxis.Thorwald C. Franke - 2021 - Norderstedt, Deutschland: Books on Demand.
    Platonische Mythen sind ein seltsames Thema, über das der Leser vielleicht hie und da schon einmal gestolpert sein mag. Seltsam deshalb, weil Platon eigentlich als Begründer des rationalen, philosophischen Denkens gilt. Warum gibt es dann Mythen bei Platon? Seltsam auch deshalb, weil das Thema immer nur am Rande auftaucht und offenbar gemieden wird. Was verbirgt sich hier? Und seltsam auch deshalb, weil diese Platonischen Mythen irgendwie anders sind als die bekannten Mythen der griechischen Mythologie. - Was also sind Platonische Mythen (...)
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  31. A Philosophical Defense of Myth: Josef Pieper’s Reading of Platonic Eschatology.Edvard Lorkovic - 2021 - Heythrop Journal 62 (2):257-269.
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  32. How Man Became the Measure: An Anthropological Defense of the Measure Doctrine in the Protagoras.Oksana Maksymchuk - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (4):571-601.
    In the Theaetetus Socrates provides an elaboration and discussion of Protagoras’ measure doctrine, grounding it in a “secret doctrine” of flux. This paper argues that the anthropology of the myth in the Protagoras provides an earlier, very different way to explain the measure doctrine, focusing on its application to civic values, such as “just,” “fine,” and “pious.” The paper shows that Protagoras’ explanation of the dual etiology of virtue – that it is acquired both by nature and by nurture – (...)
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  33. Writing the Manic Subject: Rhetorical Passivity in Plato's Phaedrus.Robin Reames & Courtney Sloey - 2021 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 54 (1):1-24.
    ABSTRACT This essay questions the reading of Plato's Phaedrus according to which writing is understood as a mechanism of objectivity and critical distance. Plato's denomination of writing as a “pharmakon” indicates a deep ambiguity in his definition of writing—an ambiguity embodied in Phaedrus's written speech. The speech triggers both critical analysis and a simultaneous “rhetorical passivity,” whereby upon hearing the speech Socrates is consumed by a manic power. Although Socrates explicitly decries the detrimental consequences of writing in the Myth of (...)
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  34. Proclus’ Theoretical Reconstructions on Plato’s Myth of Atlantis.Christos Terezis & Lydia Petridou - 2021 - Philotheos 21 (2):151-167.
    In this article, we present a proposal for a synthetic theoretical approach of the myth of Atlantis, firstly presented by Plato in his Timaeus, and, subsequently, systematically approached by Proclus. Τhis is first and foremost a literary subject which in Proclus’ texts, involves many disciplines and causes general interest for research. The main question to deal with since Plato’s era is whether this is a myth or a true story. In our view, Proclus’ comments on the Timaeus appear to be (...)
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  35. Glaucon’s Fate: History, Myth, and Character in Plato’s Republic, by Jacob Howland.Maya Alapin - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):485-490.
  36. Self-Protection and the Afterlife Myth in Plato’s Gorgias.Leo Catana - 2020 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 108 (4):591-609.
    On croit souvent que le mythe du Gorgias de Platon a pour objet d’expliquer comment la vertu dans cette vie est récompensée dans l’au-delà. L’auteur soutient qu’il s’agit d’une fausse piste. En réalité, le mythe renforce la conception qu’a Socrate de la « protection » [ boētheia ]. Elle structure le mythe et est un concept éthique dans le débat entre Socrate et Calliclès qui a eu lieu plus tôt dans le dialogue. Selon l’auteur, Socrate entend la « protection » (...)
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  37. John Sallis, Ed. 2017. Plato’s Statesman: Dialectic, Myth, and Politics. Albany: SUNY. 326pp. [REVIEW]Romeo Domdii Cliff - 2020 - Plato Journal 20:213-223.
    The collected volume Plato’s Statesman: Dialectic, Myth, and Politics presents some of the new interesting research being conducted on the Statesman. The volume is edited by John Sallis who is well known for his work in phenomenology, including writings on such authors as Jacques Derrida, Martin Heidegger, Friedrich Nietzsche and Immanuel Kant, and he has a continental approach to reading Plato. The new research on the Statesman will proceed by ways of the following three points in the collected volume. We (...)
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  38. The Golden Age and the Reversal of the Myth of Good Government in Plato’s Statesman. A Lesson on the Use of Models.Fulvia de Luise - 2020 - Plato Journal 20:21-37.
    We would be wrong to state that Plato’s approach to the Golden Age in the Statesman occurs through nostalgia, even if he stresses the immense distance between our world and that blessed time. After evoking the shepherd-god as a ruler, Plato shows that the completely abandoned disposition of the ruled is only justifiable in presence of an unbridgeable chasm between the two, such as that between gods and men, or men and beasts. The real question in the Statesman is how (...)
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  39. The Myth of Cronus in Plato’s Statesman: Cosmic Rotation and Earthly Correspondence.Corinne Gartner & Claudia Yau - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):437-462.
    The cosmological myth in Plato’s Statesman has generated several longstanding scholarly disputes, among them a controversy concerning the number and nature of the cosmic rotation cycles that it depicts. According to the standard interpretation, there are two cycles of rotation: west-to-east rotation occurs during the age of Cronus, and east-to-west rotation occurs during the age of Zeus, which is also our present era. Recent readings have challenged this two-cycle interpretation, arguing that the period of rotation opposed to our own is (...)
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  40. Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought.Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2020 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
    Plato's penchant for mythmaking sits uneasily beside his reputation as the inventor of rationalist philosophy. Hegel's solution was to ignore the myths. Popper thought them disqualifying. Tae-Yeoun Keum responds by carving out a place for myth in the context of rationalism and shows how Plato's tales inspired history's great political thinkers.
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  41. Plato's Myth of Er and the Reconfiguration of Nature.Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2020 - American Political Science Review 114 (1):54 - 67.
    Why did Plato conclude the Republic, arguably his most celebrated work of political theory, with the Myth of Er, an obscure story of indeterminate political-theoretical significance? This paper advances a novel reading of the Myth of Er that attends to the common plot that it shares with two earlier narrative interludes in the Republic. It suggests that Plato constructed the myth as an account of a search, akin to the sorting of potential philosopher-kings that underwrites the kallipolis’ educational curriculum, for (...)
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  42. The State of Example: Sovereignty and Bare Speech in Plato's Laws.Robert S. Leib - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (3):407-423.
    In Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer project, he gives an archaeology of Western political power from ancient Rome up through Carl Schmitt's model of "exceptional sovereignty," where the sovereign is "he who decides on the exception."1 Agamben takes Schmitt's thesis further, arguing that, in modern biopolitics, the "sovereign is he who decides on the value or the nonvalue of life as such," and therefore, on life and death in the state.2 Although this model also appears in Foucault's work, Penelope Deutscher argues (...)
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  43. Platon im Theater: Der Gorgias im Dialog mit Euripides’ Antiope.Michael Schramm - 2020 - Hermes 148 (3):286.
    This paper examines the influence of Euripides on Plato, reflecting the intertextuality between Euripides‘ Antiope und Plato’s Gorgias (esp. the agon between Zethos and Amphion and the agon between Callicles and Socrates, then the deus ex machina in the Antiope and the myth of the afterlife in the Gorgias). It is argued that the final part of the Gorgias is a serious philosophical answer to the tragic aporias, which Euripides dramatically staged in his Antiope (that is the aporia of supposed (...)
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  44. Husserl’s Timaeus. Plato’s Creation Myth and the Phenomenological Concept of Metaphysics as the Teleological Science of the World.Emiliano Trizio - 2020 - Studia Phaenomenologica 20:77-100.
    According to Husserl, Plato played a fundamental role in the development of the notion of teleology, so much so that Husserl viewed the myth narrated in the Timaeus as a fundamental stage in the long history that he hoped would eventually lead to a teleological science of the world grounded in transcendental phenomenology. This article explores this interpretation of Plato’s legacy in light of Husserl’s thesis that Plato was the initiator of the ideal of genuine science. It also outlines how (...)
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  45. Μύθος και διαλεκτική στον Πλάτωνα: Μια ανίχνευση της λειτουργίας του μύθου ως μέρους της πλατωνικής μεθόδου.Athanasia Giasoumi - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Patras
    Η παρούσα διατριβή πραγματεύεται τη σχέση που συνδέει την μυθική σύνθεση και την διαλεκτική μέθοδο στο πλατωνικό έργο. Οι περισσότεροι μελετητές, βασιζόμενοι στις ποιητικές κριτικές του Πλάτωνος στην Πολιτεία, υποστηρίζουν ότι ο φιλόσοφος εξορίζει την ποίηση και την τέχνη εν γένει, από την ιδανική πολιτεία του, και, κατά συνέπεια, δεν θα έπρεπε ο ίδιος να συνθέτει και να χρησιμοποιεί μύθους. Ενάντια σε αυτή τη θεώρηση, επιχειρώ να δείξω, αφενός, ότι ο Πλάτων διακρίνει δύο είδη ποιήσεως· το ένα το υιοθετεί, το (...)
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  46. Political Myths in Plato and Asimov.Nathaniel Goldberg - 2019 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 2:1-19.
    Works of science fiction tend to describe hypothetical futures, or counterfactual pasts or presents, to entertain their readers. Philosophical thought experiments tend to describe counterfactual situations to test their readers’ philosophical intuitions. Indeed, works of science fiction can sometimes be read as containing thought experiments. I compare one especially famous thought experiment from Plato’s Republic with what I read as two thought experiments from Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy. All three thought experiments concern myths used in political contexts, and comparing them (...)
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  47. Myth in Plato's philosophy.Luiz Maurício Bentim da Rocha Menezes - 2019 - Investigação Filosófica 10 (1):07.
    The aim of this paper is analysis the myth in Plato’s work based on the paper of Ludwig Edelstein. In his work, Edelstein presents to us the reason why Plato uses the myth and the function it plays in his philosophy. The author thus contributes to the development of thought on the subject and provides a lever for later studies on the myth in Plato. Finally, we will present a critical conclusion on the subject.
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  48. Glaucon's Fate: History, Myth, and Character in Plato's Republic by Jacob Howland.Adam Thomas - 2019 - Review of Metaphysics 73 (1):140-141.
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  49. Glaucon’s Fate. History, Myth, and Character in Plato’s Republic, written by Jacob Howland.Roslyn Weiss - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):401-404.
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  50. Plato's "myths".Mark Anderson - 2018 - In Carolina López-Ruiz (ed.), Gods, Heroes, and Monsters: A Sourcebook of Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern Myths in Translation. Oxford, UK:
    Translations of the “myths” from Plato’s Protagoras (320c-324d), Symposium (189c-193d), Republic (614b-621d), Timaeus (20d-25d and 29d-34b), and Kritias (108e-121c).
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