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  1. Aşk Ereni Diotima: Diotima’Nın Eros’U Ve Anadolu Tasavvufu.Ömer Mızrak - forthcoming - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy.
    There are many similarities in both form and content between the path Diotima described in order to reach Beauty through Eros which we encounter in Plato's Symposion dialogue and the tenets of the Anatolian Sufism which is a religion of love. Rather than investigating whether there is any organic connec-tion between the two approaches or the channels through which such a connec-tion is established, this study aims to show the two approaches in light of each other. Thus, it is argued (...)
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  2. The Philosopher’s Reward: Contemplation and Immortality in Plato’s Dialogues.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In Alex Long (ed.), Immortality in Ancient Philosophy.
    In dialogues ranging from the Symposium to the Timaeus, Plato appears to propose that the philosopher’s grasp of the forms may confer immortality upon him. Whatever can Plato mean in making such a claim? What does he take immortality to consist in, such that it could constitute a reward for philosophical enlightenment? And how is this proposal compatible with Plato’s insistence throughout his corpus that all soul, not just philosophical soul, is immortal? In this chapter, I pursue these questions by (...)
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  3. Why Eros?Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In D. Ebrey and R. Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato.
    One of the ways in which Plato has captured the popular imagination is with the claim that the philosopher can feel erôs, passionate love, for the objects of knowledge. Why should Plato make this claim? In this chapter, I explore Plato’s treatment of philosophical erôs along three dimensions. First, I consider the source of philosophical erôs. I argue that it is grounded in our mortality and imperfection, which give rise to a desire for immortality and the immortal. Second, I turn (...)
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  4. Plato's Symposium. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    The dramatic nature of Plato’s dialogues is delightfully evident in the Symposium. The marriage between character and thought bursts forth as the guests gather at Agathon’s house to celebrate the success of his first tragedy. With wit and insight, they each present their ideas about love—from Erixymachus’s scientific naturalism to Aristophanes’ comic fantasy. The unexpected arrival of Alcibiades breaks the spell cast by Diotima’s ethereal climb up the staircase of love to beauty itself. Ecstasy and intoxication clash as Plato concludes (...)
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  5. Saving Diotima’s Account of Erotic Love in Plato’s Symposium.Thomas M. Tuozzo - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):83-104.
  6. Éros, amour et sexualité : la paiderastía dans le Banquet de Platon.Pascal-Olivier Dumas-Dubreuil - 2020 - Ithaque 2020:25-47.
    Le texte du Banquet de Platon constitue l’un des témoignages les plus importants de ce que fut l’institution pédérastique en Grèce antique. Le dialogue sur l’amour, qui prend la forme d’une réunion au cours de laquelle les différents protagonistes feront successivement l’éloge d’Éros, pose toutefois problème dans la mesure où la position de l’auteur est éminemment ambigüe. Bien que la position de Diotime semble plus cohérente avec le reste de la doctrine platonicienne, il serait malgré tout réducteur de considérer celle (...)
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  7. The Telos Problem in Plato’s Symposium.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2020 - In Evan Keeling & Georgia Sermamoglou (eds.), Wisdom, Love and Friendship in Ancient Philosophy. De Gruyter.
  8. Two Passions in Plato’s Symposium: Diotima’s To Kalon as a Reorientation of Imperialistic Erōs.Mateo Duque - 2019 - In Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.), Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press – Fonte Aretusa. pp. 95-110.
    In this essay, I propose a reading of two contrasting passions, two kinds of erōs, in the "Symposium." On the one hand, there is the imperialistic desire for conquering and possessing that Alcibiades represents; and on the other hand, there is the productive love of immortal wisdom that Diotima represents. It’s not just what Alcibiades says in the Symposium, but also what he symbolizes. Alcibiades gives a speech in honor of Socrates and of his unrequited love for him, but even (...)
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  9. On Plato's Conception of Change.Francesco Ademollo - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 55:35-83.
    In this paper I argue that in several passages Plato sympathizes with the following view: sensible particulars undergo continuous, pervasive physical change; as a consequence, where there seems to be one and the same object which is identical through time, there is in fact a succession of impermanent objects numerically distinct from each other but similar to each other. I illustrate the difference between this view—which invites interesting comparisons with modern and contemporary theories—and other, superficially similar views which Plato criticizes. (...)
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  10. Current Views on Plato's Symposium - Destrée, Giannopoulou Plato's Symposium. A Critical Guide. Pp. X + 268. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Cased, £64.99, Us$99.99. Isbn: 978-1-107-11005-2. [REVIEW]Anthony Hooper - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):356-359.
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  11. Epoché as the Erotic Conversion of One Into Two.Rachel Aumiller - 2017 - In Giuseppe Veltri (ed.), Yearbook of the Maimonides Centre for Advanced Studies. Berlin, Germany: pp. 3-13.
    This essay interprets the epoché of ancient scepticism as the perpetual conversion of the love of one into the love of two. The process of one becoming two is represented in Plato’s Symposium by Diotima’s description of the second rung of ‘the ladder,’ by which one ascends to the highest form of philosophical devotion (Pl. Sym. 209e-210e). Diotima’s ladder offers a vision of philosophy as a total conversion of both the lover and the object of love (or philosopher and object (...)
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  12. Plato's Symposium: A Critical Guide.Pierre Destrée & Zina Giannopoulou (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Symposium is an exceptionally multi-layered dialogue. At once a historical document, a philosophical drama that enacts abstract ideas in an often light-hearted way, and a literary masterpiece, it has exerted an influence that goes well beyond the confines of philosophy. The essays in this volume, by leading scholars, offer detailed analyses of all parts of the work, focusing on the central and much-debated theme of erōs or 'human desire' - which can refer both to physical desire or desire for (...)
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  13. Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
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  14. The Functions of Apollodorus.Matthew D. Walker - 2016 - In Mauro Tulli & Michael Erler (eds.), The Selected Papers of the Tenth Symposium Platonicum. 53757 Sankt Augustin, Germany: pp. 110-116.
    In Plato’s Symposium, the mysterious Apollodorus recounts to an unnamed comrade, and to us, Aristodemus’ story of just what happened at Agathon’s drinking party. Since Apollodorus did not attend the party, however, it is unclear what relevance he could have to our understanding of Socrates’ speech, or to the Alcibiadean “satyr and silenic drama” (222d) that follows. The strangeness of Apollodorus is accentuated by his recession into the background after only two Stephanus pages. What difference—if any—does Apollodorus make to the (...)
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  15. The Moral of the Story: On Fables and Philosophy in Plato's 'Symposium'.Rick Benitez - 2015 - Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) 1:1-14.
    Scholars have puzzled over the fact that Plato’s criticisms of poetry are themselves contained in mimetic works. This paper sheds light on that phenomenon by examining an analogous one. The Symposium contains one fable which is criticised by means of another which is thought to represent Plato’s own view. Diotima’s fable, however, is suspended within a larger narrative that invites us to examine and question it. The Symposium thus affords opportunity to observe Plato’s criticisms of a genre and the qualifications (...)
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  16. The Solonian Legacy in Socrates.Lucas Fain - 2015 - Helios 42 (1):209-243.
  17. The Role of Diotima in the Symposium: The Dialogue and Its Double.Christian Keime - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 379-400.
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  18. 'Making New Gods? A Reflection on the Gift of the Symposium.Mitchell Miller - 2015 - In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 285-306.
    A commentary on the Symposium as a challenge and a gift to Athens. I begin with a reflection on three dates: 416 bce, the date of Agathon’s victory party, c. 400, the approximate date of Apollodorus’ retelling of the party, and c. 375, the approximate date of the ‘publication’ of the dialogue, and I argue that Plato reminds his contemporary Athens both of its great poetic and legal and scientific traditions and of the historical fact that the way late fourth (...)
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  19. Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
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  20. Orphic Aristophanes at Plato’s Symposium.Fernando Santoro - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 211-226.
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  21. Interpretation and Inspiration in Plato’s Symposium.Lacey Saw - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):287-302.
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  22. Climbing the Ladder of Love.Brendan Shea - 2015 - In Adam Barkman & Robert Arp (eds.), Downton Abbey and Philosophy: Thinking in the Manor. Open Court. pp. 249-259.
    Downton Abbey is, at its most basic, a story driven by intimate, romantic relationships: Mary and Matthew, Bates and Anna, Sybil and Branson, Lord and Lady Grantham, and many others. As viewers, we root for (or against) these characters as they fall in love, quarrel, break up, reconcile, have children, and deal with separation and death. But what do we get out of this? Is it merely an emotional “rush,” or is it something more meaningful? In this essay, I’ll attempt (...)
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  23. La redécouverte de la « via regia ». Freud lecteur de Platon.Marco Solinas - 2015 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 113 (4):535-567.
    A partir du renvoi à la « maxime de Platon » insérée dans l’avant dernière page de la première édition de L’interprétation du rêve, l’auteur expose d’abord les convergences entre la conception du rêve de Platon présentée dans La République et les intuitions qui fondent l’édifice métapsychologique freudien. A la lumière des sources textuelles citées par Freud et de ses intérêts, l’auteur avance ensuite l’hypothèse selon laquelle Freud aurait non seulement omis de reconnaître la généalogie théorétique platonicienne de la « (...)
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  24. Plato, Forms, and Moral Motivation.Iakovos Vasiliou - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:37-70.
  25. André Höhn: Beobachtungen zur Formung des Sokratesbildes im platonischen 'Symposion'. [REVIEW]Gregor Damschen & Rafael Ferber - 2014 - Gnomon 86 (7):644-646.
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  26. STUDIES OF EROS - Sanders, Thumiger, Carey, Lowe Erôs in Ancient Greece. Pp. Xiv + 349, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £75, US$160. ISBN: 978-0-19-960550-7. [REVIEW]Simon Goldhill - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):39-41.
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  27. The Failed Seduction: Alcibiades, Socrates, and the Epithumetic Comportment.James M. Ambury - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):257-274.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s Alcibiades is the embodiment of what I call the epithumetic comportment, a way of life made possible by the naïve ontological assumption that appearance is all that is. In the first part of the paper, I read select portions of the Alcibiades I and establish a distinction between the epithumetic comportment, which desires gratification in exchange for flattery, and the erotic comportment, which desires care of the soul. In the second half of the (...)
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  28. Eros and Ironic Intoxication: Profound Longing, Madness and Discipleship in Plato’s Symposium and in Modern Life.Kieran Bonner - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):0952695113479358.
    The Symposium addresses the relation between desire, beauty and the good life, while indicating the fascination that strong teaching arouses in followers. For Plato, unlike for moderns, power, desire and ethics are interrelated. This article takes Socrates as a case study for the Platonic understanding of this interrelation and it will put into play the grounds involved in their modern separation. It focuses on the three speakers in the dialogue who were followers of Socrates as a way of addressing the (...)
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  29. Images for the Sake of the Truth in Plato's Symposium.Yancy Hughes Dominick - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):558-566.
    After arriving drunk at Agathon's party, Alcibiades offers to praise Socrates instead of love, the object of the other characters' praise. In praising Socrates, Alcibiades says that he will have to use images. He assures his companions, however, that this ‘is no joke: the image will be for the sake of the truth’. Alcibiades goes on to present his famous images of a Socrates who is full of divine images, and who casts spells with his words. Later, Alcibiades describes those (...)
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  30. The Greatest Hope of All: Aristophanes on Human Nature in Plato's Symposium.Anthony Hooper - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):567-579.
    In recent years there has been a renaissance of scholarly interest in Plato's Symposium, as scholars have again begun to recognize the philosophical subtlety and complexity of the dialogue. But despite the quality and quantity of the studies that have been produced few contain an extended analysis of the speech of Aristophanes; an unusual oversight given that Aristophanes' encomium is one of the highlights of the dialogue. In contrast to the plodding and technical speeches that precede it, the father of (...)
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  31. In Liminal Tension Towards Giving Birth: Eros, the Educator.Arpad Szakolczai - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):0952695113478242.
    The discussion on the nature of eros (love as sexual desire) in Plato’s Symposium offers us special insights concerning the potential role played by love in social and political life. While about eros, the dialogue also claims to offer a true image of Socrates, generating a complex puzzle. This article offers a solution to this puzzle by reconstructing and interpreting Plato’s theatrical presentation of his argument, making use of the structure of the plays of Aristophanes, a protagonist in the dialogue. (...)
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  32. Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  33. Review of Thomas L. Cooksey, Plato's Symposium: A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London-New York. 2010. [REVIEW]Laura Candiotto - 2012 - Plato Journal 12.
    The book consists of four chapters (1. Context; 2. Overview of Themes; 3. Reading the Text; 4. Reception and Influence) that offer the reader guidance in reading Plato's Symposium. Secondary literature is mostly in English. The line of interpretation may be defined as partly literary and partly thematic — being aware of the philosophical significance of the adopted style. The literary part contains a detailed description of the characters and the frame story; the thematic part comprises: (…) - 12. Plato (...)
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  34. Phaedrus' Cosmology in the Symposium: A Reappraisal.Jordi Pàmias - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (2):532-540.
  35. The Symposium and Platonic Ethics: Plato, Vlastos, and a Misguided Debate.Frisbee Sheffield - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (2):117-141.
    Abstract Scholarship on the Symposium is dominated by a debate on interpersonal love started by Gregory Vlastos in his article, `The Individual as an Object of Love in Plato.' This paper argues that this debate is a misguided one, because it is not reflective of the central concerns of this text. Attention needs to be turned to the broader ethical questions posed about the ends of life, the nature of human happiness, and contemplation. Failure to do so will mean that (...)
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  36. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
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  37. Die komplexe Anlage von Vorgespräch und Rahmenhandlung und andere literarisch-formale Aspekte des Symposion (172a1-178a5).Jula Wildberger - 2012 - In Christoph Horn (ed.), Platon, Symposion (Series: Klassiker Auslegen). Berlin: Akademie Verlag. pp. 17-34.
    Reads the frame of Plato’s Symposium and analyses this dialogue’s humor and literary form with a view to the philosophical import of such means of expression. Argues that the frame introduces the Symposium as an over-the-top parody of Platonic dialogue. Multiple layers of reporting and the leitmotif of mirror-imitation points the reader to the futility of such forms of reception.
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  38. Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium.Steven Berg - 2011 - State University of New York Press.
    _Provocative reinterpretation of Plato's Symposium._.
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  39. Leaders in the Years to Come: Attitudes and Opinions of Party Delegates in Italy.Paola Bordandini, Aldo Di Virgilio & Rosa Mulé - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):159-170.
  40. Middle-Level Party Elite Members' Attitudes Toward Candidate Selection Within Italian Parties.Aldo Di Virgilio & Daniela Giannetti - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):205-234.
  41. Humor, Dialectic, and Human Nature in Plato.Edward C. Halper - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):319-330.
    Drawing principally on the Symposium, this paper argues that humor in Plato’s dialogues serves two serious purposes. First, Plato uses puns and other devices to disarm the reader’s defenses and thereby allow her to consider philosophical ideas that she would otherwise dismiss. Second, insofar as human beings can only be understood through unchanging forms that we fail to attain, our lives are discontinuous and only partly intelligible. Since, though, the discontinuity between expectation and actual occurrence is the basis for humor, (...)
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  42. The Unwritten Teachings in Plato’s Symposium: Socrates’ Initiation Into the Ἀριϴμός of Ἔρως.Burt C. Hopkins - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):279-298.
    The paper argues that the ontology of Self behind Descartes’s paradigmatic modern account of passion is an obstacle to interpreting properly the account Socrates gives in the Symposium of the truth of Eros’s origin, nature, and gift to the philosophical initiate into his truth. The key to interpreting this account is located in the relation between Eros and the arithmos-structure of the community of kinds, which is disclosed in terms of the Symposium’s dramatic mimesis of the two Platonic sources of (...)
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  43. Participation and Parties: The Positions of Party Congress Delegates.Francesco Raniolo - 2011 - Polis: Research and studies on Italian society and politics 25 (2):235-262.
  44. Friendship - (M.P.) Nichols Socrates on Friendship and Community. Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Pp. Viii + 229. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Paper, £17.99, US$28.99 (Cased, £45, US$80). ISBN: 978-0-521-14883-2 (978-0-521-89973-4 Hbk). [REVIEW]Mary Shanahan - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (2):404-406.
  45. VIII—Beyond Eros: Friendship in the "Phaedrus".Frisbee C. C. Sheffield - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (2pt2):251-273.
    It is often held that Plato did not have a viable account of interpersonal love. The account of eros—roughly, desire—in the Symposium appears to fail, and, though the Lysis contains much suggestive material for an account of philia—roughly, friendship—this is an aporetic dialogue, which fails, ultimately, to provide an account of friendship. This paper argues that Plato's account of friendship is in the Phaedrus. This dialogue outlines three kinds of philia relationship, the highest of which compares favourably to the Aristotelian (...)
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  46. Wise Woman Versus Manic Man : Diotima and Alcibiades in Plato's Symposium.William O. Stephens - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
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  47. Plato’s “Symposium”.Jeffrey Dirk Wilson - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (1):150-152.
  48. Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium.Steven Berg - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Author Steven Berg offers an interpretation of this dialogue wherein all the speakers at the banquetwith the exception of Socratesnot only offer their views on ...
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  49. Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium.Ulrika Carlsson - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):41-67.
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to unhappy love—what (...)
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  50. Salut Socrate: Le Symposion de Platon Adapté Pour la Scène: Nouvelle Traduction, Commentaires, Contributions.Michael Groneberg (ed.) - 2010 - Centre de Traduction Littéraire de Lausanne.
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