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  1. Advising the cosmopolis.Eric Brown - manuscript
    Plutarch charges that Stoic theory is inconsistent with Stoic political engagement no matter what they decide to do, because the Stoics' endorsement of the political life is inconsistent with their cosmopolitan rejection of ordinary politics (Stoic.rep., ab init.). Drawing on evidence from Chrysippus and Seneca, I develop an argument that answers this charge, and I draw out two interesting implications of the argument. The first implication is for scholars of ancient Stoicism who like to say that Stoicism is apolitical. The (...)
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  2. How many riddles did Oedipus solve?Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper proposes that before the opening of Sophocles’ play Oedipus the King, the “hero” had to solve a lot of riddles.
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  3. Modifications to Aristotle's Poetics.E. Garrett Ennis - manuscript
    Aristotle's Poetics has been the basis for theories of entertainment for over 2,000 years. But the general approach it uses has led to a number of gaps, contradictions, and difficulties in predicting the success of books, plays, movies, and entertainment as a whole, so much so that sayings like "there are no rules, but you break them at your peril," and "in Hollywood, nobody knows anything" have become widespread and accepted. -/- However, it turns out that a model of entertainment (...)
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  4. The Antidosis of Isocrates and Aristotle's Protrepticus.D. S. Hutchinson & Monte Ransome Johnson - manuscript
    Isocrates' Antidosis ("Defense against the Exchange") and Aristotle's Protrepticus ("Exhortation to Philosophy") were recovered from oblivion in the late nineteenth century. In this article we demonstrate that the two texts happen to be directly related. Aristotle's Protrepticus was a response, on behalf of the Academy, to Isocrates' criticism of the Academy and its theoretical preoccupations. -/- Contents: I. Introduction: Protrepticus, text and context II. Authentication of the Protrepticus of Aristotle III. Isocrates and philosophy in Athens in the 4th century IV. (...)
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  5. Der Mensch als Lebewesen. Zum zoologischen Denken des Aristoteles.Sergiusz Kazmierski - manuscript
    Vortrag, gehalten am 11. November 2020 im Rahmen einer Ringvorlesung am Regensburger Zentrum für Klassikstudien zum Thema "Entfernte Verwandte - Mensch und Tier". Die aristotelische Bestimmung des Menschen ist ein Rätsel. Daher soll sie im Folgenden auch als ein Rätsel behandelt werden. Ziel ist es, hier nicht das bei Aristoteles finden zu wollen, was wir heute ohnehin schon über den Menschen als ein Lebewesen wissen oder zu wissen glauben, sondern es gilt im Folgenden von Aristoteles ahnen zu lernen, was wir (...)
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  6. The Chronic Divan.Mota Victor - manuscript
  7. Espaço 1999.Mota Victor - manuscript
    Science fiction and futuristic reality beyond the Self.
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  8. Visual Trope and the Portland Vase Frieze: A New Reading and Exegesis.Randall L. Skalsky - Winter 1992 - Arion 2 (1).
    Among the extant masterworks of Roman art, there is probably none that has generated more scholarly debate than the Portland Vase over the interpretation of its elegant frieze. No fewer than forty-four different theories attempting to interpret the scenes on the vase have appeared in the last 400 years. In the main, the theories fall into two categories, those relating the frieze to Greek myth, and those linking the figures to Roman personages. Moreover, there is no consensus whether the frieze (...)
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  9. Aspects of the Rapid Development of Christian Religious Travel in the 4th Century A.D.Jan M. Van der Molen - Mar 20, 2020 - University of Groningen.
    'People travelled for numerous reasons,' so J.W. Drijvers submits at the beginning of his piece on travel and pilgrimage literature. Be it ‘commerce, government affairs, religion, education, military business or migration,’ people ‘made use of the elaborate system of roads and modes of transport such as wagons, horses and boats’ to traverse the far-reaching stretches of the Roman Empire. And for 4th century Christians in particular, participating in religious festivals as well as interaction with holy sites, sacred artifacts and clergymen (...)
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  10. Templi Ptolemaei — A look at the Purpose of the Serapeum at Alexandria.Jan M. van der Molen - Jan 28, 2019 - University of Groningen.
    The most discussed of architectural marvels tend to be the Temple of Zeus at Olympia, the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus or the Parthenon at Athens, supposedly because they are the ones we happen to have nominated ‘world wonders’; but that doesn’t mean all the rest of temple-type sites to be found across the greater Mediterranean area have less wonder about them. On the contrary; when wanting to explore and explain the role temples played in the lives of their ‘subscribers’ and a (...)
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  11. Divine Leadership and The Ruler Cult in Roman and Contemporary Times.Jan M. Van der Molen - Jan 13, 2020 - University of Groningen.
    Seeing how the idea of the ‘ruler cult’ and the necessary ‘myth-making’ to establish it exists to this day, as seen with the regime of a 21st century dictator like Kim Jong-il, it would be most interesting to see what parallels exist between cases of divine leadership and what we might learn about our contemporary cult rulers when looking at the dynamics of the two-millennia-old cult of the deified Emperor Augustus. As such, I have formulated a central question that focuses (...)
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  12. A Double Tragic Allusion in Ammianus Marcellinus 14.1.3.Francisco J. Alonso - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-9.
    This article identifies a double allusion to the tragic characters of Phaedra and Eriphyle in Amm. Marc. 14.1.3 and considers its possible meanings. In combination, these allusions evoke the double nature of the story of Eriphyle, therefore functioning as a reference to the double nature of Caesar Gallus’ depiction in Ammianus. The double allusion consequently forms part of Ammianus’ tragic style throughout Book 14. Having identified the presence of this double allusion, the article illuminates its possible meaning by connecting Ammianus’ (...)
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  13. Architectural Memory and trimalchio's Porticvs.Anna Anguissola - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-9.
    This paper seeks to respond to two questions posed by previous commentators concerning the arrangement of Trimalchio's porticus as described in Petronius’ Satyrica (Sat. 29): first, whether the freedman's house lacked an atrium; second, whether the cursores (runners) who are described as unconventionally exercising in the portico were pictorial representations or real-life athletes who would symbolize the social incompetence of the dominus. This paper argues that nothing in the text supports the interpretation of Trimalchio's house as having an unconventional architectural (...)
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  14. Another commentary on tacitus - Ash tacitus: Annals book XV. pp. XVI + 368, maps. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2018. Paper, £24.99, us$31.99 . Isbn: 978-0-521-26939-1. [REVIEW]Salvador Bartera - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  15. How Did Homer's Troilus Die?Bill Beck - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-13.
    This article examines ancient depictions of the death of Troilus in art and literature and challenges the widespread belief that the Iliad implies an alternative version of the myth in which Troilus dies in battle. In particular, it argues that the death-in-battle interpretation is both insufficiently supported by the internal evidence and incompatible with the external evidence. Given the evident popularity of the story of Achilles’ ambush of Troilus in the Archaic period, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that (...)
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  16. Pliny, Trajan and the Introduction of the Iselasticvm for Victorious Athletes.Christoph Begass - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-8.
    In two letters, Pliny and Trajan discuss a petition sent to the governor by the guild of athletes concerning their rewards after winning contests (Plin. Ep. 10.118–19). In his request, Pliny refers to a regulation by which Trajan had settled the rights of the victorious athletes in regard to their home cities. In his response, Trajan repeats the case with slight variations. The two letters pose both philological and historical difficulties, which this article aims to solve. The relevant passage in (...)
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  17. Fulvia and the Cheeky Rhetor (Suet. Rhet. 5).J. Lea Beness & Tom Hillard - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-5.
    This paper concerns the translation and interpretation of a succinct quip of Sextus Clodius, a rhetorician in Antony's entourage, on the subject of Fulvia's swollen cheek. The jest is often interpreted as having suggested that she tempted Clodius’ pen, and various double meanings have been proposed. Contextualization may supply a key. The remark could mean that Fulvia seemed to be testing the point of her stylus, and the dark allusion might then be to reports of the manner in which Fulvia (...)
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  18. SCRIBAL PRACTICE - (K.) Bentein, (Y.) Amory (edd.) Novel Perspectives on Communication Practices in Antiquity. Towards a Historical Social-Semiotic Approach. (Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava 41.) Pp. x + 198, figs, ills. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2023. Cased, €138. ISBN: 978-90-04-52651-8. [REVIEW]Andrea Bernini - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  19. The Frenzied Swallow: Philomela's Voice in Sophocles’ Tereus.Chiara Blanco - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-14.
    This paper investigates Philomela's metamorphosis into a swallow as inferred from Sophocles’ fragmentary Tereus. The first part focusses on the association between the swallow and barbaric language, casting new light on Philomela's characterization in the play. The second investigates the shuttle, the weaving tool which prompts the recognition of Philomela, arguing that the mention of its ‘voice’ in fr. 595 Radt refers not only to the tapestry which it created, but also to the actual sound of the shuttle, which ancient (...)
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  20. DIVINATION FROM A COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE - (G.) Frigerio A Cognitive Analysis of the Main Apolline Divinatory Practices. Decoding Divination. Pp. xii + 198, ills. London and New York: Routledge, 2023. Cased, £120, US$160. ISBN: 978-1-032-41152-1. [REVIEW]Hugh Bowden - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  21. Group Minds in Ancient Greek Historiography and the Ancient Greek Novel: Herodian's History_ and chariton's _Callirhoe.Chrysanthos S. Chrysanthou - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This article explores Herodian's History of the Roman Empire alongside Chariton's novel Callirhoe with an eye to how the minds of collective entities are represented and function in the two narratives. It argues that Chariton, unlike Herodian, elaborates on the diversity of emotions that characterizes a specific collective experience and has groups use direct speech throughout. These choices add vividness to the narrative and intensify the fictional sensationalism and dramatic character of the novel. It also shows that, whereas collectives in (...)
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  22. Group Minds in Ancient Greek Historiography and the Ancient Greek Novel: Herodian's History_ and chariton's _Callirhoe–Erratum.Chrysanthos S. Chrysanthou - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-1.
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  23. Teaching classics. Holmes-Henderson, hunt, musié forward with classics. Classical languages in schools and communities. Pp. XVIII + 276, fig., Ills. London and new York: Bloomsbury academic, 2018. Paper, £29.99, us$40.95 . Isbn: 978-1-4742-9767-7. [REVIEW]Jessica Coatesworth - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  24. Two studies on ancient magic - frankfurter guide to the study of ancient magic. Pp. XX + 797, b/w & colour ills. Leiden and boston: Brill, 2019. Cased, €249, us$299. Isbn: 978-90-04-17157-2. - Watson magic in ancient greece and Rome. Pp. X + 248, ills. London and new York: Bloomsbury academic, 2019. Paper, £19.99, us$26.95 . Isbn: 978-1-78831-298-1. [REVIEW]Leonardo Costantini - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  25. Neel Early Rome: Myth and Society. A Sourcebook. Pp. xviii + 318, ills, maps. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2017. Paper, £34.50, US$44.95 . ISBN: 978-1-119-08380-1. [REVIEW]James Crooks - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-1.
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  26. Omnia Tvta Timens_(Virgil, _Aeneid 4.298): Allusion and Ambiguity.Paolo Dainotti - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-5.
    This paper deals with a case of Virgilian ambiguity, namely the famous hemistich at Aen. 4.298 omnia tuta timens. By highlighting a plausible reading with a causal force (‘fearing everything too calm’, ‘because of the excessive calmness’), it seeks to demonstrate that this hemistich is an ambiguous passage. This view is confirmed through the imitation by Valerius Flaccus, who, in alluding to the Virgilian passage (Argonautica 8.408–12), highlights its ambiguity by including both of the most plausible readings.
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  27. Notes on the Text of varro's De Lingva Latina.Marcus Deufert, Vincent Graf, Silvia Ottaviano & Kevin Protze - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This article discusses the text of seven passages in the etymological books 5–7 of Varro's De lingua Latina, and proposes new conjectures for all of them. The discussions are of direct relevance to the interpretation of fragments and testimonies of lost Latin authors quoted by Varro: the scenic poets Naevius, Pacuvius, Caecilius Statius, Juventius and Atilius, and the grammarian Aurelius Opillus. The starting point for the discussions is the new Oxford edition of Varro's De lingua Latina by Wolfgang de Melo.
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  28. "Stoic Homeric Allegoresis," in Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Homer from the Hellenistic Age to Late Antiquity, ed. Christina-Panagiota Manolea, Leiden: Brill, 2021.Ilaria L. E. Ramelli - forthcoming - In Christina-Panagiota Manolea (ed.), Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Homer from the Hellenistic Age to Late Antiquity. Leiden, Netherlands:
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  29. Slavery and Religion in Late Antiquity: Their Relation to Asceticism and Justice in Christianity and Judaism, in: Slavery in the Late Antique World, 150–700 CE., ed. Chris L. De Wet, Maijastina Kahlos, and Ville Vuolanto, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021.Ilaria L. E. Ramelli - forthcoming - In Christian De Wet (ed.), Slavery in the Late Antique World. Cambridge, UK - New York, US:
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  30. JOSEPHUS AND PLUTARCH ON LAWGIVERS - (U.) Westwood Moses among the Greek Lawgivers. Reading Josephus’ Antiquities_ through Plutarch's _Lives_. (Supplements to the _Journal for the Study of Judaism 210.) Pp. xiv + 264. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2023. Cased, €116, US$129. ISBN: 978-90-04-68134-7. [REVIEW]David R. Edwards - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  31. Τwo Beginnings: Acrostic Commencements in Horace ( Epod._ 1.1–2) and Ovid ( _Met. 1.1–3).Brett Evans - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-15.
    This article proposes that Horace's Epodes and Ovid's Metamorphoses open with significant acrostics that comprise the first two letters, in some cases forming syllables, of successive lines: IB-AM/IAMB (Epod. 1.1–2) and IN-CO-(H)AS (Met. 1.1–3). Each acrostic, it will be argued, tees up programmatic concerns vital to the work it opens: generic identity and the interrelation of form and content (Epodes), etymology and monumentality (Metamorphoses). Moreover, as befits their placement at the head of collections, both acrostics negotiate the challenge of literary (...)
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  32. Diogenes Laertius 7.134.†Michael Frede - forthcoming - Phronesis:1-22.
    In describing the Stoic principles, the manuscript tradition of DL 7.134 preserves readings which variously call them σώµατα, ‘bodies’, or ἀσώµατα, ‘incorporeals’; but the Suida quotes this passage with ἀσωµάτους, ‘incorporeal’. This paper shows that the Suida has the best reading. This is not the only, or the clearest, case where the Suida can correct our text: another example considered here concerns DL 7.74.
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  33. ANCIENT DESCRIPTIONS OF PAIN - (J.R.) Clarke, (D.) King, (H.) Baltussen (edd.) Pain Narratives in Greco-Roman Writings. Studies in the Representation of Physical and Mental Suffering. (Studies in Ancient Medicine 58.) Pp. xiv + 312, colour ills. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2023. Cased, €118. ISBN: 978-90-04-54948-7. [REVIEW]Giulia Freni - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  34. ECOCRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON OVID - (F.) Martelli, (G.) Sissa (edd.) Ovid's Metamorphoses and the Environmental Imagination. Pp. xii + 250, ills. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2023. Cased, £85, US$115. ISBN: 978-1-350-26894-4. [REVIEW]Kirk Freudenburg - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  35. The Gods’ Delay: Ovid, Heroides 7.21.Edoardo Galfré - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This note makes a new argument for van Lennep's conjecture di at Ovid, Heroides 7.21 against the manuscript reading te.
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  36. AN INTRODUCTION TO PLAUTUS’ CASINA. Christenson Plautus: Casina. Pp. x + 162. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019. Paper, £17.99, US$24.95 . ISBN: 978-1-350-02053-5. [REVIEW]Domenico Giordani - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  37. Hermesianax's Poetics of Love in Context.Massimo Giuseppetti - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-10.
    The article focusses on the catalogue of love-affairs from Book 3 of Hermesianax's Leontion (fr. 7 Powell = 3 Lightfoot). Contrary to two basic assumptions of previous scholarship, this article underscores that fr. 3 Lightfoot is neither representative of the Leontion as a whole nor an instance of unsophisticated poetic production. The evidence indicates that Hermesianax's catalogue might have played a crucial role in shaping the later reception of some of the figures he portrays (Mimnermus, Antimachus and perhaps even Hesiod). (...)
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  38. Lucretius’ Homeric Mourners.John Godwin - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-5.
    Lucretius (3.894–9) puts words into the mouths of mourners as part of his attack on the fear of death. The language of the passage has been read simply as mockery of the bereaved, but the poet is using language strongly reminiscent of Homer, in particular from Circe's speech advising Odysseus about the dangers of hearing the Sirens’ singing. This adds a level of irony to the passage as the poet has a complex relationship with the bewitching power of poetry.
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  39. Posidonius on Virtue and the Good.Severin Gotz - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This paper argues that despite recent tendencies to minimize the differences between Posidonius and the Early Stoics, there are some important aspects of Stoic ethics in which Posidonius deviated from the orthodox doctrine. According to two passages in Diogenes Laertius, Posidonius counted health and wealth among the goods and held that virtue alone is insufficient for happiness. While Kidd in his commentary dismissed this report as spurious, there are good reasons to take Diogenes’ remarks seriously. Through a careful analysis of (...)
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  40. Mandarins and Iconoclasts.Peter Green - forthcoming - Arion 6 (3).
  41. Emendationes Tibvllianae I.Maxwell Hardy - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-8.
    Conjectures are made on the text of three passages in Tibullus, Books 1–2: 1.4.26 hastam … suam for crines … suos, 2.1.56 membra for bache, 2.4.60 aliis rebus for alias herbas.
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  42. ISAGOGICAL PATTERNS IN ANCIENT TEXTS - (A.) Motta, (F.M.) Petrucci (edd.) Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity. (Philosophia Antiqua 164.) Pp. xii + 269. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2022. Cased, €130, US$156. ISBN: 978-90-04-50618-3. [REVIEW]Mareike Hauer - forthcoming - The Classical Review.
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  43. Cynthia's Birthday Acrostic (3.10.1–5): Propertius on Elegiac Time and Eternity.Julia D. Hejduk - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-7.
    This article argues that an intentional acrostic spanning the first five lines of Propertius’ elegy for Cynthia's birthday (3.10), MANE[T], contributes significantly to the poignancy and purpose of the poem. MANE can be read as māne, ‘in the morning’, or manē, ‘stay!’, both of which emphasize the fleeting nature of dawn—and of Cynthia's youthful beauty. MANET can suggest both ‘[art] remains’ and ‘[death] awaits’. All four of these meanings work together to capture the tension between human transience and artistic immortality. (...)
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  44. Proclus.Christoph Helmig - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  45. Conjectures and Observations on Catullus 63.T. A. J. Hockings - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-12.
    This article discusses textually problematic passages in Catullus 63, a particularly corrupt poem from a particularly corrupt manuscript tradition. It proposes new conjectures and revives several old ones. Throughout there are notes on punctuation, conjecture attribution and an analysis of the structure of Attis’ lament.
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  46. From antiquity to frankenstein. Weiner, Stevens, Rogers frankenstein and its classics. The modern prometheus from antiquity to science fiction. Pp. XIV + 273, ills, maps. London and new York: Bloomsbury academic, 2018. Paper, £21.99, us$29.95 . Isbn: 978-1-350-05487-5. [REVIEW]Camilla Jackson - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  47. Aspects of Roman daily life. Sessa daily life in late antiquity. Pp. X + 250, ills, map. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2018. Paper, £21.99, us$29.99 . Isbn: 978-0-521-14840-5. [REVIEW]Alison John - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  48. JOKING IN GREEK COMEDY - (N.) Scott Jokes in Greek Comedy. From Puns to Poetics. Pp. x + 181. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2023. Cased, £85, US$115. ISBN: 978-1-350-24848-9. [REVIEW]Dimitrios Kanellakis - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  49. GUIDANCE ON CICERO'S DE OFFICIIS_- (R.) Woolf (ed.) Cicero's _De Officiis. A Critical Guide. Pp. xii + 256. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2023. Cased, £85, US$110. ISBN: 978-1-316-51801-4. [REVIEW]Michele Kennerly - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  50. TERENCE'S ANDRIA IN CONTEXT - Goldberg Terence: Andria. Pp. xiv + 141, ills. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019. Paper, £17.99, US$24.95 . ISBN: 978-1-350-02062-7. [REVIEW]Ortwin Knorr - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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1 — 50 / 34129