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  1. Plato, the Intimacies Project.Carolina Drake - manuscript
    I explore the role of intimacy and chance in Republic and their function as dangerous or threatening to self-sufficiency. I argue that both intimacy and chance are wrongly construed as a burden, or as disruptive to the regime of the just city and that, ultimately, the job of philosophy is to regulate affect and the risk of chance in the city. I conclude that the repercussions of Plato’s strong account of self-sufficiency can be found to this day in our contemporary (...)
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  2. Plato's Political Philosophy.Abdollāh Niksirat - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 44.
    The writer of this paper has tried to portray Plato's ideal government on the basis of his Republic. Apparently, Plato's main purpose in this dialogue was to define true justice rather than have his intended ideal government realized. The gist of his words concerning justice is that everyone must do the job that conforms to his nature. Of course, as Plato himself has pointed out, introducing and defining such an ideal city or utopia will inspire people to model it and (...)
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  3. City Walls.Staatliche Museen zu Berlin - unknown - The Classical Review 62 (2).
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  4. Two Kinds of Mental Conflict in Republic IV.Galen Barry & Edith Gwendolyn Nally - forthcoming - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis.
  5. Philosophers in the Republic: Plato's Two Paradigms.Sophia Connell - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly:pqv043.
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  6. The Parts of the Soul.K. Corcilius, D. Perler & C. Helmig (eds.) - forthcoming - De Gruyter.
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  7. Review of Crotty's "The City-State of the Soul". [REVIEW]Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Review of Metaphysics.
  8. Plato's Republic, Books Three & Four. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books Three and Four of The Republic, Socrates and Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, discuss the best way to educate leaders for a just republic. In the course of their dialogue, the meaning of justice in individuals and in society shifts from external order imposed through rules and regulations to the harmony and balance internal to every person in the republic. Only then will an individual be ready to act—whether in acquiring wealth, in the care of the body, or (...)
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  9. Plato's Republic, Books Five & Six. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books Five and Six of The Republic, the quest for justice that has guided the dialogue from the beginning now shifts to the search for an even more encompassing quality—goodness. But what is the nature of goodness? Can human beings know it and teach it to others? How can it be manifested in the republic? To answer such questions requires a genuine lover of wisdom. How can such people be distinguished from those who simply pretend to know? This dramatized (...)
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  10. Plato's Republic, Books One & Two. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    In Books One and Two of The Republic presents a discussion of the nature of justice by Socrates, the aging Cephalus, his son Polemarchus, and the sophist Thrasymachus. Plato's brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus, take over in Book Two, challenging Socrates to convince them that a just life is preferable to an unjust life with power, fame, and riches. They imagine and evaluate different ways of creating the best possible human life. First, they consider a republic based on health and simplicity. (...)
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  11. Plato's Republic, Books Seven & Eight. Plato - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    Book Seven of The Republic begins with the famous Allegory of the Cave, an exploration of the natural process of being educated. Socrates and Glaucon probe the meaning of this story both as it relates to the discussion of knowledge and reality developed earlier and to the concept of dialectic, the over-all method of Plato's dialogues. In Book Eight, Socrates and Plato's brothers explore five different kinds of republic and five different kinds of individual, showing how aristocracy becomes timocracy and (...)
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  12. The Ethical Critique of Art in the Republic.D. Robinson - forthcoming - Dianoia.
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  13. Sean Sayers, Plato's Republic: An Introduction.S. Sandford - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  14. Thrasymachus' Theory of Justice'.J. R. S. Wilson - forthcoming - Polis.
  15. Fenomenología de la polis y torsión del Dasein: dialéctica y hermenéutica en la temprana interpretación gadameriana de la ética platónica.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2021 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 1 (82):63-80.
    English title: Phenomenology of the pólis and torsion of Dasein: dialectic and hermeneutics in the early Gadamerian interpretation of Plato's ethics. Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present and analyse the main hypotheses of Hans-Georg Gadamer in his 1931 book Platos dialektische Ethik. Phänomenologische Interpretationen zum Philebos regarding the notions of pólis, aretḗ, tó agathṓn y Dasein. Then, it will be attempted to show that in this early book of Gadamer is his first relevant philosophical-political work, expressed in (...)
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  16. Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):152-169.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
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  17. Politics in Socrates’ Cave: Comments on Adriel M. Trott.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - In Gary Gurtler & Daniel Maher (eds.), Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium on Ancient Philosophy. Leyden: pp. 57-62.
    In her “Saving the Appearances in Plato’s Cave,” Dr. Adriel M. Trott argues that “the philosopher’s claim to true knowledge always operates within the realm of the cave.” In order to probe her claim, I challenge her to make sense of “politics in the cave,” namely the status and practices of two categories of people in the cave: “woke” cave dwellers (namely, those who recognize shadows as shadows but have not left the cave) and “woke” puppeteers (namely, philosophers ruling within (...)
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  18. Analytic Philosophy, the Ancient Philosopher Poets and the Poetics of Analytic Philosophy.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):158-182.
    The paper starts with reflections on Plato’s critique of the poets and the preference many express for Aristotle’s view of poetry. The second part of the paper takes a case study of analytic treatments of ancient philosophy, including the ancient philosopher poets, to examine the poetics of analytic philosophy, diagnosing a preference in Analytic philosophy for a clean non-poetic style of presentation, and then develops this in considering how well historians of philosophy in the Analytic tradition can accommodate the contributions (...)
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  19. Plato as Critical Theorist.Tristan Bradshaw - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (2):108-111.
  20. A Wolf in the City: Tyranny and the Tyrant in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (279):419-421.
    In this dense, intelligent, but often frustrating work, Cinzia Arruzza argues that Plato's depiction of tyranny and the character of the tyrant in the Republic is best interpreted as, ‘an intervention in a debate concerning the transformed relation between political leaders and demos in Athenian democracy’ (p. 9) in the last decades of the fifth century BCE. Her central claim is that Plato's critique of tyranny in the Republic was aimed at showing that this particular historical form of Athenian democracy, (...)
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  21. The One Over Many Principle of Republic 596a.José Edgar González-Varela - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):339-361.
    Republic 596a introduces a One over Many principle that has traditionally been considered as an argument for the existence of Forms, according to which, one Form should be posited for each like-named plurality. This interpretation was challenged by (Smith, J. A. 1917. “General Relative Clauses in Greek.” Classical Review 31: 69–71.), who interpreted it rather as a statement that each Form is unique and correlated to a plurality of things that have the same name as it. (Sedley, D. 2013. “Plato (...)
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  22. Why Liberalism Failed. By Patrick J. Deneen. Pp. Xxxi, 225, New Haven/London, Yale University Press, 2018, $13.07.Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):195-196.
  23. What is Eikasia?Damien Storey - 2020 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 58:19-57.
    This paper defends a reading of eikasia—the lowest kind of cognition in the Divided Line—as a kind empirical cognition that Plato appeals to when explaining, among other things, the origin of ethical error. The paper has two central claims. First, eikasia with respect to, for example, goodness or justice is not different in kind to eikasia with respect to purely sensory images like shadows and reflections: the only difference is that in the first case the sensory images include representations of (...)
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  24. Book Review: Poetic Justice: Rereading Plato’s “Republic,” by Jill Frank. [REVIEW]Jonny Thakkar - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (1):121-126.
  25. Review of Samuel Scolnicov, Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, Edited by Harold Tarrant. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):549-550.
    This volume, a lightly-edited version of Professor Samuel Scolnicov’s 1974 Ph.D. thesis, is a fitting tribute to his impressive career. It will perhaps be most useful for those interested in better understanding Scolnicov’s work and his views on Plato as a whole, not least for the comprehensive list of his publications that requires a full twelve pages of print. Scholars with an interest in Plato’s method of hypothesis will also find some useful remarks on key passages in the Meno, Phaedo, (...)
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  26. The Translation of Republic 606a3–B5 and Plato's Partite Psychology.Damien Storey - 2019 - Classical Philology 114 (1):136-141.
    In this paper I discuss the translation of a line in Plato's description of the ‘greatest accusation’ against imitative poetry, Republic 606a3–b5. This line is pivotal in Plato's account of how poetry corrupts its audience and is one of the Republic's most complex and interesting applications of his partite psychology, but it is misconstrued in most recent translations, including the most widely used. I argue that an examination of the text and reflections on Platonic psychology settle the translation decisively.
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  27. A READING OF PLATO'S REPUBLIC - Frank Poetic Justice. Rereading Plato's Republic. Pp. Xii + 251. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. Paper, US$30 . ISBN: 978-0-226-51577-9. [REVIEW]Roslyn Weiss - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):54-56.
  28. How to Play the Platonic Flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X.Gene Fendt - 2018 - In Heather L. Reid & Jeremy C. DeLong (eds.), The Many Faces of Mimēsis: Selected Essays from the Third Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece,. Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press. pp. 37-48.
    The usual interpretation of Republic 10 takes it as Socrates’ multilevel philosophical demonstration of the untruth and dangerousness of mimesis and its required excision from a well ordered polity. Such readings miss the play of the Platonic mimesis which has within it precisely ordered antistrophes which turn its oft remarked strophes perfectly around. First, this argument, famously concluding to the unreliability of image-makers for producing knowledge begins with two images—the mirror (596e) and the painter. I will show both undercut the (...)
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  29. Thrasymachus’ Unerring Skill and the Arguments of Republic 1.Tamer Nawar - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (4):359-391.
    In defending the view that justice is the advantage of the stronger, Thrasymachus puzzlingly claims that rulers never err and that any practitioner of a skill or expertise (τέχνη) is infallible. In what follows, Socrates offers a number of arguments directed against Thrasymachus’ views concerning the nature of skill, ruling, and justice. Commentators typically take a dim view of both Thrasymachus’ claims about skill (which are dismissed as an ungrounded and purely ad hoc response to Socrates’ initial criticisms) and Socrates’ (...)
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  30. The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: A Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  31. Becoming Socrates: Political Philosophy in Plato's Parmenides.Alex Priou - 2018 - Rochester, NY, USA: Rochester University Press.
    Interpreters of Plato’s Parmenides have long agreed that it is a canonical work in the history of ontology. In the first part, the aged Parmenides presents a devastating critique of Platonic ontology, followed in the second by what purports to be a response to that critique. But despite the scholarly agreement as to the general subject matter of the dialogue, what makes it one whole has nevertheless eluded its readers, so much so that some have even speculated it to be (...)
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  32. The Consolation of Philosophy as Cosmic Image.Myra L. Uhlfelder - 2018 - Tempe, AZ: ACMRS.
    In this study, Uhlfelder argues convincingly that, in portraying his literary persona as an exemplum of man in his quest for self-knowledge, Boethius has made the whole Consolatio a cosmic image representing man as microcosm. The mental faculties of sensus, imaginatio, ratio, and intellegentia are arranged as a proportion suggesting both Plato’s famous “divided line” at the end of Book 6 of the Republic and, at the same time, the four elements of the physical cosmos which, according to the Platonic (...)
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  33. Republic 382a-D: On the Dangers and Benefits of Falsehood.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - Classical Philology 112 (1):1-19.
    Socrates' attitude towards falsehood is quite puzzling in the Republic. Although Socrates is clearly committed to truth, at several points he discusses the benefits of falsehood. This occurs most notably in Book 3 with the "noble lie" (414d-415c) and most disturbingly in Book 5 with the "rigged sexual lottery" (459d-460c). This raises the question: What kinds of falsehoods does Socrates think are beneficial, and what kinds of falsehoods does he think are harmful? And more broadly: What can this tell us (...)
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  34. Departed Souls? Tripartition at the Close of Plato’s Republic.Nathan Bauer - 2017 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 20 (1):139-157.
    Plato’s tripartite soul plays a central role in his account of justice in the Republic. It thus comes as a surprise to find him apparently abandoning this model at the end of the work, when he suggests that the soul, as immortal, must be simple. I propose a way of reconciling these claims, appealing to neglected features of the city-soul analogy and the argument for the soul’s division. The original true soul, I argue, is partitioned, but in a finer manner (...)
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  35. The Principle of Non-Contradiction in Plato's Republic: An Argument for Form.Laurence Bloom - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    What sorts of things qualify as first principles of reasoning and what kind of justification for them can be offered? We think of principles like that of non-contradiction as first principles of reasoning. Laurence Bloom argues that Plato’s Republic, the first text that affords us a complete statement of the Principle of Non-contradiction, offers us a powerful, complex and detailed argument for taking form—specifically that of the good—as the first principle of both knowing and being.
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  36. A New Discussion of ‘the Books’. D. Scott Levels of Argument. A Comparative Study of Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Pp. VIII + 235. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Cased, £40, Us$70. Isbn: 978-0-19-924964-0. [REVIEW]Lawrence Jost - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (1):22-24.
  37. Who Are the Philotheamones and What Are They Thinking?Constance Meinwald - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):39-57.
  38. Blood Money.Char Roone Miller - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (2):216-239.
    Contemporary responses to Plato’s Republic rarely examine its complex relationship to festivals and sacrifice. Recovering the importance of the festival to Plato’s concerns, this article reveals Plato’s displacement of the sacrificial violence of ancient Greek festivals with the language and possibilities of money. The first section introduces, through the opening scenes of the Republic, the significance of money in Ancient Greece, particularly its affiliation with the ritual dynamics of the festival. The second section focuses on animal sacrifice, developing the central (...)
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  39. The Rhetoric of Plato’s Republic: Democracy and the Philosophical Problem of Persuasion.Andrew Payne - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (2):446-448.
  40. Formung und Umwendung der Seele - Eine Rechtfertigung ambivalenter Darstellungen in der Literatur im Rahmen von Platons 'Politeia'.Jana Schultz - 2017 - Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang.
  41. La via platonica alla Interpretazione dei sogni.Marco Solinas - 2017 - ViaBorgogna3 6:66-73.
    Analisi della possibile influenza esercitata dalla lettura di Platone su Freud, e in particolare della teoria del sogno come via per conoscere dei desideri precedentemnte "repressi" esposta nella "Repubblica".
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  42. Hume on Church Establishments, Secular Politics and History.Aaron Szymkowiak - 2017 - Diametros 54:95-117.
    In the third volume of the History of England, David Hume considers the political ramifications of the Protestant reformation with a “Digression concerning the ecclesiastical state.” He advocates the establishment of a state church, believing it will dampen religious “enthusiasm” in the polity. Unlike later secularization theorists, Hume assumes an intractable basis for religion in the human passions. Tensions in Hume’s “cooptation” strategy are evident from Adam Smith’s famous attack upon it in section five of The Wealth of Nations, and (...)
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  43. Learning to Read the Small Letters in Republic Book 2.Naly Thaler - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (1):45-66.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  44. The Political Significance of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave.Gabriel Zamosc - 2017 - Ideas Y Valores 66 (165):237-265.
    Abstract: In this paper I claim that Plato’s Cave is fundamentally a political, not an epistemological image, and that only by treating it as such can we appreciate correctly its relation to the images of the Sun and the Line. On the basis of textual evidence, I question the two main assumptions that support (in my view, mistakenly) the effort to find an epistemological parallel between the Cave and the Line: first, that the prisoners represent humankind in general, and, second, (...)
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  45. A Mild Remedy for a Mild Disease: The Text of Republic 459b.Tad Brennan - 2016 - Classical Quarterly 66 (2):775-777.
    I correct the text of Republic 459b, where a word has dropped out and left us with a fallacious argument.
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  46. Political Pathology in Plato’s Republic.Sara Brill - 2016 - Apeiron 49 (2).
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  47. The City-State of the Soul: Constituting the Self in Plato’s Republic.Kevin M. Crotty - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    The City-State of the Soul: Self-Constitution in Plato’s Republic offers a reinterpretation of Plato’s philosophical masterpiece, which presents the moral life as consisting, most deeply, in the constituting or “founding” of one’s own soul. Plato wants to persuade the brightest and most ambitious that the life of justice and, in particular, of just governance puts their talents and ambitions to their best possible use.
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  48. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  49. Is the Form of the Good a Final Cause for Plato?Elizabeth Jelinek - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2):99-116.
    Many assume that Plato's Form of the Good is a final cause. This might be true if one assumes an Aristotelian definition of final cause; however, I argue that if one adopts Plato's conception of final causation as evidenced in the Phaedo and Timaeus, the claim that the Form of the Good is a final cause for Plato is untenable.
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  50. Plato’s Open Secret.Demetra Kasimis - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (4):339-357.
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