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  1. Anamnēsis as Aneuriskein, Anakinein, and Analambanein in the Meno.Douglas A. Shepardson - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly.
    This article examines the theory of recollection in the Meno and attempts to unravel some longstanding puzzles about it. What are the prenatal objects of the soul’s vision? What are the postnatal objects of the soul’s recollection? What is innate in the Meno? Why does Socrates (prima facie) suggest that both knowledge and true opinion are innate? To answer these questions, the article pays particular attention to the ana- prefix in the verbs aneuriskô, anakineô and analambanô and suggests that they (...)
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  2. Relações entre a noção de “cuidado-da-alma” e o “conhecimento de si” no Primeiro Alcibíades.Marcos Sidnei Pagotto-Euzebio - 2017 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 38 (1):93-108.
    O artigo busca apresentar as relações entre as exigências de cuidado-da-alma e a necessidade do conhecimento-de-si presentes no diálogo platônico Primeiro Alcibíades, indicando a forte ligação de tal aperfeiçoamento de si com o da pólis. Também as dimensões erótica, teológica, ética e política se encontram firmemente unidas no diálogo, visto que a formação do homem político exige o vínculo entre discípulo e mestre, sendo este o guia em direção ao reconhecimento da divindade, pois conhecer-se significa, ao final, conhecer a alma (...)
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  3. Riferimento, essere e partecipazione. Prm. 160b5-163b6 e il Sofista.Roberto Granieri - forthcoming - In Selected Papers of the Symposium Platonicum XII .
    This paper examines the fifth deduction (160b4-163b5) of the second part of the Parmenides and its connection with the Sophist. I argue that, far from providing us with clear formulations of arguments and theses developed in the Sophist, D5 aims to stimulate us to reflect on two main problems, which are relevant for the ontology and the theory of predication of the Sophist. First, the ontological requirements of the extra-linguistic correlates of contentful thought and meaningful speech. Second, the function of (...)
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  4. L’ontologie du plaisir dans le Philèbe et le vocabulaire platonicien de l’être.Roberto Granieri - forthcoming - Philosophie Antique.
    Dans cet article on se propose d’examiner les fondements ontologiques de l’argument anti-hédoniste de Philèbe 53c4-55a1. On soutiendra que l’usage des notions de γένεσις et οὐσία dans cet argument ne montre ni un abandon de la thèse de l’opposition du sensible à l’intelligible, ni, pour autant, une application mécanique de cette thèse. On souhaite montrer, en revanche, que ces notions jouissent d’une relativité sémantique telle que leurs significations varient en fonction des contextes argumentatifs, dont le passage retenu du Philèbe est (...)
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  5. Knowledge and Ignorance of Self in Platonic Philosophy, Edited by James M. Ambury and Andy German.D. Muñoz-Hutchinson - 2021 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 15 (1):99-102.
  6. Autoengaño, ambición y arrogancia en el Alcibíades de Platón.Daniel Vázquez - 2016 - In J. M. Roqueñi (ed.), Afectividad y confianza en el conocimiento personal. Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico: pp. 13-30.
  7. Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2002 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    The book "Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism" focuses on two main aspects, construction and criticism. The constriction of Forms theory is the basis on which Plato built all of his philosophy and which influenced all forms of ideas philosophy that emerged after Plato. The research topic was completed by adding Aristotle's critique of the theory of Forms in order to put a clear picture in front of the reader, which was presented by Plato himself and (...)
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  8. Animism, Aristotelianism, and the Legacy of William Gilbert’s De Magnete.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Perspectives on Science 29 (2):157-188.
    William Gilbert’s 1600 book, De magnete, greatly influenced early modern natural philosophy. The book describes an impressive array of physical experiments, but it also advances a metaphysical view at odds with the soon to emerge mechanical philosophy. That view was animism. I distinguish two kinds of animism – Aristotelian and Platonic – and argue that Gilbert was an Aristotelian animist. Taking Robert Boyle as an example, I then show that early modern arguments against animism were often effective only against Platonic (...)
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  9. Power and Person in Plato’s Alcibiades I.Olof Pettersson - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):23-36.
    This paper argues that Socrates’ discussion about selfhood in the first Alcibiades does not only dissociate the soul from the body and from the soul-body complex, but also from λόγος. It suggests that the most promising and influential take on this, the so-called theocentric view, is insufficient, and needs to be supplemented in terms of how Socrates’ notion of ideal selfhood is conditioned by knowledge of a real or personal self.
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  10. Plato's Examination of Pleasure.L. A. Post & R. Hackforth - 1946 - American Journal of Philology 67 (4):378.
  11. Kritik über Sassi (2007): Tracce nella mente. Teorie della memoria da Platone ai moderni.Antonio Cimino - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):269-271.
  12. Self-Knowledge, Elenchus and Authority in Early Plato.Fiona Leigh - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):247-280.
    In some of Plato’s early dialogues we find a concern with correctly ascertaining the contents of a particular kind of one’s own psychological states, cognitive states. Indeed, one of the achievements of the elenctic method is to facilitate cognitive self-knowledge. In the Alcibiades, moreover, Plato interprets the Delphic injunction, ‘know yourself’, as crucially requiring cognitive self-knowledge, and ending in knowing oneself as subject to particular epistemic norms. Epistemic authority for self-knowledge is, for Plato, conferred on the basis of correct application (...)
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  13. The Sleep of Reason: Sleep and the Philosophical Soul in Ancient Greece.Victoria Wohl - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):126-151.
    Freud tracked the psyche along the paths of sleep, following the “royal road” of dreams. For the ancient Greeks, too, the psyche was revealed in sleep, not through the semiotics of dreams but through the peculiar state of being we occupy while asleep. As a “borderland between living and not living”, sleep offered unique access to the psukhē, that element within the self unassimilable to waking consciousness. This paper examines how Greek philosophers theorized the sleep state and the somnolent psukhē, (...)
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  14. Psychology and Ontology in Plato, Edited by Pitteloud, L. And E. Keeling.Øyvind Rabbås - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):69-71.
  15. Plato on the Enslavement of Reason.Mark A. Johnstone - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):382-394.
    In Republic 8–9, Socrates describes four main kinds of vicious people, all of whose souls are “ruled” by an element other than reason, and in some of whom reason is said to be “enslaved.” What role does reason play in such souls? In this paper, I argue, based on Republic 8–9 and related passages, and in contrast to some common alternative views, that for Plato the “enslavement” of reason consists in this: instead of determining for itself what is good, reason (...)
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  16. Plato’s Moral Psychology: Intellectualism, the Divided Soul, and the Desire for Good, by Rachana Kamtekar. [REVIEW]G. S. Bowe - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):477-481.
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  17. Self-Knowledge in the Eye-Soul Analogy of the Alcibiades.Daniel Ferguson - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):369-391.
    The kind of self-knowledge at issue in the eye-soul analogy of the Alcibiades is knowledge of one’s epistemic state, i.e. what one knows and does not know, rather than knowledge of what one is. My evidence for this is the connection between knowledge of one’s epistemic state and self-improvement, the equivalence of self-knowledge to moderation, and the fact that ‘looking’ into the soul of another is a metaphor for elenctic discussion. The final lines of the analogy clarify that the part (...)
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  18. The Old Linguistic Problem of 'Reference' in a Modern Reading of Plato's Sophist.Sepehr Ehsani - manuscript
    This paper is about interpreting the aim of Plato's Sophist in a linguistic framework and arguing that in its attempt at resolving the conundrum of what the true meaning and essence of the word "sophist" could be, it resembles a number of themes encountered in contemporary linguistics. I think it is important to put our findings from the Sophist in a broader Platonic context: in other words, I assume—I think not too unreasonably—that Plato pursued (or at least had in mind) (...)
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  19. Mind and Body in Ancient Greek Thought. Ostenfeld Ancient Greek Psychology and the Modern Mind–Body Debate. Second Edition. Pp. 179. Baden-Baden: Academia Verlag, 2018 . Paper, €32.50. Isbn: 978-3-89665-759-6. [REVIEW]David G. Welch - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
  20. Forms, Matter and Mind: Three Strands in Plato’s Metaphysics.Erik Ostenfeld - 1982 - The Hague/London/Boston: Martinus Nijhoff.
    The present work is an attempt to analyse critically Plato's views on mind and body and more particularly on the mind-body relationship within the wider setting of Plato's metaphysics. We seek to achieve this by a philosophical examination"-of the dialogues on the basis of a generally accepted order. Strictly speaking "soul" ought perhaps to be substituted for "mind" in the above. But it seems to be in terms of "mind" that modern philosophers deal with and refer to the problem that (...)
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  21. Neutral, Natural and Hedonic State in Plato.Wei Cheng - 2019 - Mnemosyne 4 (72):525-549.
    This paper aims to clarify Plato’s notions of the natural and the neutral state in relation to hedonic properties. Contra two extreme trends among scholars—people either conflate one state with the other, or keep them apart as to establish an unsurmount- able gap between both states, I argue that neither view accurately reflects Plato’s position because the natural state is real and can coincide with the neutral state in part, whereas the latter, as an umbrella term, can also be realized (...)
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  22. Promêtheia as Rational Agency in Plato.Christopher Moore - 2020 - Apeiron 54 (1):89-107.
    The Greeks knew a virtue term that represented the ability to determine which norms deserved commitment, a virtue term usually misunderstood as “prediction of likely outcomes” or “being hesitant”: promêtheia. Plato’s uses of this term, almost completely ignored by scholarship, show a sensitivity to the prerequisites for the capacity for rational agency. We must add this virtue term to the usual suspects related to acting as a rational agent: sôphrosunê, dikaiosunê, phrônesis, and sophia. Promêtheia stands out for its importance in (...)
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  23. Athenagoras N. Zakopoulos: Plato on Man; a Summary and Critique of His Psychology with Special Reference to Pre-Platonic Freudian Behavioristic and Humanistic Psychology. Pp. 142. New York: Philosophical Library Inc., 1975. Cloth, $7.5O. [REVIEW]I. M. Crombie - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (2):288-288.
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  24. Plato’s Anti-Hedonism and the Protagoras, Written by J. Clerk Shaw.James Warren - 2015 - Polis 32 (2):423-426.
  25. Erik Ostenfeld: Ancient Greek Psychology and the Modern Mind–Body Debate. Pp. 109. Aarhus University Press, 1986. Paper, D. Kr. 79. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (2):427-427.
  26. Plato's Republic and Functional Teleology. Payne the Teleology of Action in Plato's Republic. Pp. VIII + 240. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Cased, £45. Isbn: 978-0-19-879902-3. [REVIEW]Catherine McKeen - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
  27. Varieties of Pleasure in Plato and Aristotle.Anthony Price - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 52:177-208.
  28. Soul and Mind in Greek Thought. Psychologial Issues in Plato and Aristotle.Marcelo D. Boeri, Yasuhira Y. Kanayama & Jorge Mittelmann (eds.) - 2018 - Springer.
    This book offers new insights into the workings of the human soul and the philosophical conception of the mind in Ancient Greece. It collects essays that deal with different but interconnected aspects of that unified picture of our mental life shared by all Ancient philosophers who thought of the soul as an immaterial substance. The papers present theoretical discussions on moral and psychological issues ranging from Socrates to Aristotle, and beyond, in connection with modern psychology. Coverage includes moral learning and (...)
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  29. Ideal Intellectual Cognition in Timeaus 37 A 2- C 5.Klaus Corcilius - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 54.
    Plato's depiction of the world soul's cognitive activity in Timaeus 37 A 2‐C 5 offers a general account of intellectual cognition. He gives this account by describing the activity of an ideal cognitive agent, involving the very same comparative mechanism that governs human intellectual activity, namely, the active production of a propositional grasp of sameness and difference that things have in relation to each other in several respects. Plato depicts the world soul's intellectual activity as entirely devoid of immediate forms (...)
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  30. Plato on the Grades of Perception: Theaetetus 184–186 and the Phaedo.Gail Fine - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 53.
  31. Aisthēsis, Reason and Appetite in the Timaeus.Emily Fletcher - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):397-434.
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  32. Affect and Sensation: Plato’s Embodied Cognition.Ian McCready-Flora - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (2):117-147.
    _ Source: _Volume 63, Issue 2, pp 117 - 147 I argue that Plato, in the _Timaeus_, draws deep theoretical distinctions between sensation and affect, which comprises pleasure, pain, desire and emotion. Sensation is both ‘fine-grained’ and ‘immediate’. Emotions, by contrast, are mediated and coarse-grained. Pleasure and pain are coarse-grained but, in a range of important cases, immediate. The _Theaetetus_ assimilates affect to sensation in a way the _Timaeus_ does not. Smell frustrates Timaeus because it is coarse-grained, although unlike pleasure (...)
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  33. Imagination, Self-Awareness, and Modal Thought at Philebus 39-40.Karel Thein - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:109-149.
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  34. The Self, the Soul, and the Individual in the City of the Laws.Maria Michela Sassi - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 35:125-148.
  35. Self-Knowledge and Ignorance in Plato’s Charmides.Gregory Kirk - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (2):303-320.
  36. Ordinary Oblivion and the Self Unmoored: Reading Plato’s Phaedrus and Writing the Soul. [REVIEW]David F. Hoinski - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):205-212.
  37. The Horns of Dilemma: Dreaming and Waking Vision in the Theaetetus.Rosemary Desjardins - 1981 - Ancient Philosophy 1 (2):109.
  38. Self-Knowledge in Plato’s Phaedrus. [REVIEW]Thomas C. Brickhouse - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):187.
  39. ΦΘΟΝΟΣ and Its Related ΠΑΘΗ in Plato and Aristotle.Michael J. Mills - 1985 - Phronesis 30:1.
  40. Self-Recognition in Plato’s Theaetetus.David Roochnik - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):37-51.
  41. Music And The Education Of The Soul In Plato And Aristotle: Homoeopathy And The Formation Of Character.Frédérique Woerther - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (1):89-103.
  42. Plato on Music, Soul and Body.Sophie Henderson (ed.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's reflection on the relationship between soul and body has attracted scholars' attention since antiquity. Less noted, but worthy of consideration, is Plato's thought on music and its effects on human beings. This book adopts an innovative approach towards analysing the soul-body problem by uncovering and emphasising the philosophical value of Plato's treatment of the phenomenon of music. By investigating in detail how Plato conceives of the musical experience and its influence on intelligence, passions and perceptions, it illuminates the intersection (...)
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  43. Plato and Davidson: Parts of the Soul and Weakness of Will.Terrence M. Penner - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (sup1):35-74.
  44. La alegoría del carro del alma en Platón y en la Kaṭha Upaniṣad.Paolo Magnone - 2012 - In Gerardo Rodriguez (ed.), Textos y contextos (II). Exégesis y hermenéutica de obras tardoantiguas y medievales. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. pp. 87-126.
    [The Soul Chariot Allegory in Plato and the Kaṭha Upaniṣad].
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  45. Soul as Structure: Plato and Aristotle on the Harmonia Theory.Douglas Young - unknown
    We are conscious beings who think, understand, feel and perceive. We are also material beings composed out of ordinary material stuff. Determining the precise connections between the psychological and the material remains problematic. The harmonia theory is one of the first attempts to frame this as a problem about composite objects. The theory itself is simple: the soul is the harmonia of the material parts of the body. But what a harmonia is and what the theory amounts to are matters (...)
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  46. Plato’s Divided Soul.Christopher Shields - 2010 - In Dominik Perler & Klaus Corcilius (eds.), Partitioning the Soul: Debates From Plato to Leibniz. De Gruyter. pp. 15-38.
  47. Partitioning the Soul: Debates From Plato to Leibniz.Dominik Perler & Klaus Corcilius (eds.) - 2014 - De Gruyter.
    Does the soul have parts? What kind of parts? And how do all the parts make together a whole? Many ancient, medieval and early modern philosophers discussed these questions, thus providing a mereological analysis of the soul. The eleven chapters reconstruct and critically examine radically different theories. They make clear that the question of how a single soul can have an internal complexity was a crucial issue for many classical thinkers.
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  48. The Phaedo of Plato.R. D. Plato & Archer-Hind - 1973 - Ayer Company.
  49. Psyche Bei Platon.Peter M. Steiner - 1992
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  50. Phaidon. Plato & Theodor Ebert - 2004 - Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.
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