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  1. Evaluative Illusion in Plato's Protagoras.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that what appears to be akrasia is, in fact, the result of a hedonic illusion: proximate pleasures appear greater than distant ones. On the face of it, his account is puzzling: why should proximate pleasures appear greater than distant ones? Certain interpreters argue that Socrates must be assuming the existence of non-rational desires that cause proximate pleasures to appear inflated. In this paper, I argue that positing non-rational desires fails to explain the hedonic error. However, (...)
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  2. Cosmos and Perception in Plato’s Timaeus: In the Eye of the Cognitive Storm. By Mark Eli Kalderon. [REVIEW]Douglas R. Campbell - 2024 - Ancient Philosophy 44 (1):255-258.
    This is an impressive and important book about perception in Plato’s Timaeus, but most of its readers will probably be researchers who are interested in much broader questions about the dialogue. There is nothing deficient or lacking about this treatment of perception, but this book should be put alongside Thomas Johansen’s Plato’s Natural Philosophy and Sarah Broadie’s Nature and Divinity in the sense that this is, for all intents and purposes, a monograph about the whole Timaeus, even though it is (...)
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  3. Does the Universe Perceive? On Cosmic Perception in the Timaeus.Preite Alesia - 2023 - Méthexis 35 (1):108–133.
    In the present paper, I argue that in order to be in a position to understand what the World Soul thinks about, we need first to answer the question of whether the universe perceives and if so, of what it perceives. I shall first (section ) lay out the main reasons for suspecting that the universe has perception and some possible objections against this view. I will then (section ) make a case for my claim that the universe has perception (...)
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  4. Cosmos and Perception in Plato's Timaeus.Mark Eli Kalderon - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    This is an essay on perception and its objects in the Timaeus. Two features of this work are noteworthy. First, the emphasis throughout is on Timaeus' views and not Plato's. Second, I show how broader aspects of Timaeus' cosmology are directly relevant to his philosophy of perception.
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  5. Blood and the Awareness of Perception. From Early Greek Thought to Plato’s Timaeus.Maria Michela Sassi - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (2):163-186.
    In this paper I first address what I consider a central issue in the account of perception in Plato’s Timaeus, namely, how the pathemata pass through the body to reach the soul, and thus become aistheseis. My point in Section 1 is that in tackling this issue Plato aims to provide a firm physiological basis to the notion of perception that starts to emerge in the Theaetetus and the Philebus and is crucial to the late development of his theory of (...)
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  6. Located in Space: Plato’s Theory of Psychic Motion.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy 42 (2):419-442.
    I argue that Plato thinks that the soul has location, surface, depth, and extension, and that the Timaeus’ composition of the soul out of eight circles is intended literally. A novel contribution is the development of an account of corporeality that denies the entailment that the soul is corporeal. I conclude by examining Aristotle’s objection to the Timaeus’ psychology and then the intellectual history of this reading of Plato.
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  7. The Soul’s Tomb: Plato on the Body as the Cause of Psychic Disorders.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):119-139.
    I argue that, according to Plato, the body is the sole cause of psychic disorders. This view is expressed at Timaeus 86b in an ambiguous sentence that has been widely misunderstood by translators and commentators. The goal of this article is to offer a new understanding of Plato’s text and view. In the first section, I argue that although the body is the result of the gods’ best efforts, their sub-optimal materials meant that the soul is constantly vulnerable to the (...)
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  8. The Soul’s Tool: Plato on the Usefulness of the Body.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Elenchos 43 (1):7-27.
    This paper concerns Plato’s characterization of the body as the soul’s tool. I take perception as an example of the body’s usefulness. I explore the Timaeus’ view that perception provides us with models of orderliness. Then, I argue that perception of confusing sensible objects is necessary for our cognitive development too. Lastly, I consider the instrumentality relationship more generally and its place in Plato’s teleological worldview.
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  9. Platon: Meisterdenker der Antike by Thomas Alexander Szlezåk (review). [REVIEW]Rafael Ferber - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (4):687-688.
  10. Self‐Motion and Cognition: Plato's Theory of the Soul.Douglas R. Campbell - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):523-544.
    I argue that Plato believes that the soul must be both the principle of motion and the subject of cognition because it moves things specifically by means of its thoughts. I begin by arguing that the soul moves things by means of such acts as examination and deliberation, and that this view is developed in response to Anaxagoras. I then argue that every kind of soul enjoys a kind of cognition, with even plant souls having a form of Aristotelian discrimination (...)
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  11. Aristotle's Empiricism.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle is famous for thinking that all our knowledge comes from perception. But it's not immediately clear what this view is meant to entail. It's not clear, for instance, what perception is supposed to contribute to the more advanced forms of knowledge that derive from it. Nor is it clear how we should understand the nature of its contribution—what it might mean to say that these more advanced forms of knowledge are "derived from" or "based on" what we perceive. Aristotle (...)
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  12. From Natural Tendencies to Perceptual Interests and Motivation in Plato’s Timaeus.Pauliina Remes - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):157-178.
    In the Timaeus, human bodies are treated as homeostatic systems, striving to maintain their natural state. This striving constitutes Plato’s explanatory framework for perception: perceptions come about when the equilibrium is shaken, and when it is restored. The article makes two main suggestions: first, that experienced pleasure and pain are grounded in non-experiential departures from and restorations of the natural state. Second, that the striving to maintain the natural state grounds perceptual interests, especially through conscious algesic and hedonic affection. Explanation (...)
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  13. Theophrastus on Plato’s Theory of Vision.Katerina Ierodiakonou - 2020 - Rhizomata 7 (2):249-268.
    In paragraphs 5 and 86 of the De sensibus Theophrastus gives a brief report of Plato’s views on the sense of vision and its object, i. e. colour, based on the Timaeus. Interestingly enough, he presents the Platonic doctrine as a third alternative to the extramission and intromission theories put forward by other ancient philosophers. In this article I examine whether or not Theophrastus’ account is impartial. I argue that at least some of his distortive departures from the Platonic dialogue (...)
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  14. What is Eikasia?Damien Storey - 2020 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 58:19-57.
    This paper defends a reading of eikasia—the lowest kind of cognition in the Divided Line—as a kind of empirical cognition that Plato appeals to when explaining, among other things, the origin of ethical error. The paper has two central claims. First, eikasia with respect to, for example, goodness or justice is not different in kind to eikasia with respect to purely sensory images like shadows and reflections: the only difference is that in the first case the sensory images include representations (...)
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  15. Pathos in the Theaetetus.Evan Keeling - 2019 - In Evan Keeling & Luca Pitteloud (eds.), Psychology and Ontology in Plato. Springer Verlag.
    This paper is a test case for the claim, made famous by Myles Burnyeat, that the ancient Greeks did not recognize subjective truth or knowledge. After a brief discussion of the issue in Sextus Empiricus, I then turn to Plato's discussion of Protagorean views in the Theaetetus. In at least two passages, it seems that Plato attributes to Protagoras the view that our subjective experiences constitute truth and knowledge, without reference to any outside world of objects. I argue that these (...)
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  16. Contradictory Appearances in Plato’s Republic.Jana Schultz - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (1):69-87.
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  17. The Ontology of the Secret Doctrine in Plato’s Theaetetus.Christopher Buckels - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (3):243-259.
    The paper offers an interpretation of a disputed portion of Plato’s Theaetetus that is often called the Secret Doctrine. It is presented as a process ontology that takes two types of processes, swift and slow motions, as fundamental building blocks for ordinary material objects. Slow motions are powers which, when realized, generate swift motions, which, in turn, are subjectively bundled to compose sensible objects and perceivers. Although the reading of the Secret Doctrine offered here—a new version of the “Causal Theory (...)
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  18. Aisthēsis, Reason and Appetite in the Timaeus.Emily Fletcher - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):397-434.
  19. What is Plato’s Epistemic Worry About Phantasia?Elizabeth Jelinek - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (2):61-67.
    Liu argues that Plato’s account of phantasia in the Sophist reveals Plato’s “deep epistemic worry about perceptual experience” (Liu, 2016, p. 175). The purpose of this paper is to identify more precisely the nature and extent of Plato’s epistemic worry. Liu claims that Plato is worried about phantasiai because, “one’s perception-based belief reflects a distorted picture of things,” but by not fully explaining the nature of this worry, Liu leaves the reader with the impression that Plato regards all phantasiai as (...)
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  20. Appearance, Perception, and Non-Rational Belief: Republic 602c-603a.Damien Storey - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 47:81-118.
    In book 10 of the Republic we find a new argument for the division of the soul. The argument’s structure is similar to the arguments in book 4 but, unlike those arguments, it centres on a purely cognitive conflict: believing and disbelieving the same thing, at the same time. The argument presents two interpretive difficulties. First, it assumes that a conflict between a belief and an appearance—e.g. disbelieving that a stick partially immersed in water is, as it appears, bent—entails a (...)
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  21. One Book, The Whole Universe: Plato's Timaeus Today. [REVIEW]Han Baltussen - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):132-133.
    A new volume on one of the most influential and most discussed works from antiquity should offer something new. In this truly interdisciplinary volume, a great number of intriguing problems posed by Plato's Timaeus are given a fresh and lucid treatment. Contributors from an unusual range of backgrounds reflect on aspects of Plato's astounding synthesis of natural philosophy, including cosmology, theology, perception, physiology, and more. Plato's synthesis was original, reusing previous ideas for a new vision of the structure and coherence (...)
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  22. A propos de la forme de l’intuition.Wilfried Kühn - 2012 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (2):213-218.
    This article is currently available as a free download on ingentaconnect.
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  23. O visível e o inteligível. Estudos sobre a percepção e o pensamento na Filosofia Grega Antiga.Miriam Campolina Diniz Peixoto, Marcelo Pimenta Marques, Fernando Rey Puente, M. C. D. Peixoto, M. P. Marques & F. R. Puente - 2012
    This book collects texts from three specialists in ancient philosophy which deal with the question of perceptive and intellective knowledge in antiquity. They try to present, in their different analyzes, the complex interrelationship among perception and thought in ancient authors, like Heraclitus, Parmenides, Democritus, Plato and Aristotle. The purpose of the texts is to expose the visible field - the perceptual knowledge domain - interacts with the invisible - the domain of reason and thought. In other words, that among them (...)
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  24. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze: Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  25. The Platonic Approach to Sense-Perception.Todd Ganson - 2005 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):1-15.
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  26. Plato's Theory of Colours in the Timaeus.Katerina Ierodiakonou - 2005 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:219-233.
    This article attempts to give a systematic analysis of the passage 67c4–68d7 from the Timaeus, in which we find Plato’s most detailed, but also extremely obscure, account of the nature and perception of colours. In particular, I focus first on the question how Plato conceives of colour, comparing Plato’s notion with that of Empedocles and showing Plato’s dependence on, but also divergence from, the Empedoclean tradition. Second, I discuss the question what, according to the Timaeus, makes things have the particular (...)
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  27. Il problema dell'intuizione: tre studi su Platone, Kant, Husserl.Anselmo Aportone, Francesco Aronadio & Paolo Spinicci - 2002
  28. Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics.Jeffrey Barnouw - 2002 - University Press of America.
    The early Greek Stoics were the first philosophers to recognize the object of normal human perception as predicative or propositional in nature. Fundamentally we do not perceive qualities or things, but situations and things happening, facts. To mark their difference from Plato and Aristotle, the Stoics adopted phantasia as their word for perception.
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  29. Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality.Myles Burnyeat, Richard Gaskin, Joël Biard, Peter Simons, Victor Caston, Richard Sorabji, Christof Rapp, Hermann Weidemann, Dorothea Frede, Claude Panaccio, Elizabeth Karger, Robert Pasnau & Cyrille Michon - 2001 - Brill.
    This volume, including sixteen contributions, analyses ancient and medieval theories of intentionality in various contexts: perception, imagination, and intellectual thinking. It sheds new light on classical theories and examines neglected sources, both Greek and Latin.
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  30. The "Theaetetus" on How We Think.David Barton - 1999 - Phronesis 44 (3):163 - 180.
    I argue that Plato's purpose in the discussion of false belief in the "Theaetetus" is to entertain and then to reject the idea that thinking is a kind of mental grasping. The interpretation allows us to make good sense of Plato's discussion of 'other-judging' (189c-190e), of his remarks about mathematical error (195d-196c), and most importantly, of the initial statement of the puzzle about falsity (188a-c). That puzzle shows that if we insist on conceiving of the relation between thought and its (...)
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  31. The Theaetetus on how we Think.David Barton - 1999 - Phronesis 44 (3):163-180.
    I argue that Plato's purpose in the discussion of false belief in the "Theaetetus" is to entertain and then to reject the idea that thinking is a kind of mental grasping. The interpretation allows us to make good sense of Plato's discussion of 'other-judging' (189c-190e), of his remarks about mathematical error (195d-196c), and most importantly, of the initial statement of the puzzle about falsity (188a-c). That puzzle shows that if we insist on conceiving of the relation between thought and its (...)
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  32. Plato on what the body's eye tells the mind's eye.Dorothea Frede - 1999 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 99 (2):191–209.
    Though the two-world interpretation of Plato's metaphysics is no longer uncontested the question of the expendability of the physical world still predominates current discussions. Against this tendency the article suggests that Plato neither intended to dispose of sensory evidence altogether nor to locate the Forms in a separate realm of pure understanding. The Forms should rather be understood as the ideal principles determining the proper function of each entity. Such a 'functional view' of the Forms is discussed explicitly in Book (...)
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  33. Observations on Perception in Plato's Later Dialogues.Michael Frede - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
  34. Thinking and Perception in Plato's "Theaetetus".Mi-Kyoung Mitzi Lee - 1999 - Apeiron 32 (4):37-54.
  35. Plato's theory of sense perception in the Timaeus: How it works and what it means'.Luc Brisson - 1997 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13:147-176.
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  36. Plato’s World Soul: Grasping Sensibles without Sense-Perception.Gretchen Reydams-Schils - 1997 - In T. Calvo & L. Brisson (eds.), Interpreting the Timaeus-Critias: Proceedings of the IV Symposium Platonicum. Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag. pp. 261-265.
  37. Socratic Anti-Empiricism in the "Phaedo".Dirk Baltzly - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):121-142.
    In the Phaedo, Socrates endorses the view that the senses are not a means whereby we may come to gain knowledge. Whenever one investigates by means of the senses, one is deceived. One can attain truth only by inquiry through intellect alone. It is a measure of the success of empiricism that modern commentators take a very different approach to Phaedo 65a9-67b3 than their neoplatonist forebearers did. In what follows I shall argue that, if they made too much of "Socrate's" (...)
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  38. Perceiving Particulars and Recollecting the Forms in the 'Phaedo'.Catherine Osborne - 1995 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:211 - 233.
    I ask whether the Recollection argument commits Socrates to the view that our only source of knowledge of the Forms is sense perception. I argue that Socrates does not confine our presently available sources of knowledge to empirically based recollection, but that he does think that we can't begin to move towards a philosophical understanding of the Forms except as a result of puzzles prompted by the shortfall of particulars in relation to the Forms, and hence that our awareness of (...)
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  39. XI*—Perceiving Particulars and Recollecting the Forms in the Phaedo.Catherine Osborne - 1995 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95 (1):211-234.
    I ask whether the Recollection argument commits Socrates to the view that our only source of knowledge of the Forms is sense perception. I argue that Socrates does not confine our presently available sources of knowledge to empirically based recollection, but that he does think that we can't begin to move towards a philosophical understanding of the Forms except as a result of puzzles prompted by the shortfall of particulars in relation to the Forms, and hence that our awareness of (...)
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  40. Sense‐experience and the Argument for Recollection in Plato's Phaedo. Bedu-Addo - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (1):27-60.
  41. Plato on Perception: A Reply to Professor Turnbull,“Becoming and Intelligibility”.Gail Fine - 1988 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:15-28.
  42. Relation and object in Plato's approach to knowledge.Oded Balaban - 1987 - Theoria 53 (2-3):141-159.
    THE aim of this paper is to explain a paradox in Plato's philosophy. On the one hand, Plato reduces virtue to knowledge; on the other, he rejects the possibility of knowledge or at least has serious doubts that it exists. I shall propose in this paper that the definition of virtue as knowledge is a logical outcome of Plato's denial of the particular aspect of knowledge as cognitive relation. This paper may also be considered as an attempt to resolve the (...)
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  43. Perception, Relativism, and Truth: Reflections on Plato's Theaetetus 152–160.Mohan Matthen - 1985 - Dialogue 24 (1):33-.
    The standard interpretation of "Theaetetus" 152-160 has Plato attribute to Protagoras a relativistic theory of truth and existence. It is argued here that in fact the individuals of Protagorean worlds are inter-Personal. (thus the Protagorean theory has public objects, but private truth). Also, a new interpretation is offered of Plato's use of heraclitean flux to model relativism. The philosophical and semantic consequences of the interpretation are explored.
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  44. Judgment and Perception in "Theaetetus" 184-186.Joseph Shea - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (1):1-14.
  45. Sense-Perception and Recollection in the Phaedo.Michael L. Morgan - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (3):237-251.
  46. Perception and Judgment in the Theaetetus.D. K. Modrak - 1981 - Phronesis 26 (1):35 - 54.
  47. Plato on the Grammar of Perceiving.M. F. Burnyeat - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):29-.
    The question contrasts two ways of expressing the role of the sense organ in perception. In one the expression referring to the sense organ is put into the dative case ; the other is a construction with the preposition δiá governing the genitive case of the word for the sense organ.
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  48. Plato, visual perception, and art.George Kimball Plochmann - 1976 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):189-200.
  49. Imagination and reason in Plato, Aristotle, Vico, Rousseau, and Keats.J. J. Chambliss - 1974 - The Hague,: M. Nijhoff.
    The present essay grew out of an inte:rest in exploring the relationship be tween "imagination" and "reason" in the history of naturalistic thinking. The essay tries to show something of the spirit of naturalism coming to terms with the place of imagination and reason in knowing, making, and doing as activities of human experience. This spirit is discussed by taking as its point of departure the thinking of five writers: Plato, Aristotle, Giam battista Vieo, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and John Keats. Plato (...)
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  50. An argument in Plato's theaetetus: 184-.A. J. Holland - 1973 - Philosophical Quarterly 23 (91):97-116.
    "theaetetus" of the thesis that knowledge is sense-perception. After a brief defence of plato's handling of this thesis it is shown how the argument can, by the addition of one premiss, be rendered valid. A strong form of the 'proper objects' doctrine of perception is revealed as a crucial premiss. An implication of the argument is seen to be that perception in itself is unable to found an ordered and coherent picture of the world. A similar point, it is argued, (...)
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