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  1. Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
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  2. Perennial Symmetry Arguments: Aristotle’s Heavenly Cosmology and Noether’s First Theorem.Ryan Michael Miller - 2019 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 93.
    Attempts to find perennial elements in Aristotle’s cosmology are doomed to failure because his distinction of sub- and supra-lunary realms no longer holds. More fruitful approaches to the contemporary importance of Aristotelian cosmology must focus on parities of reasoning rather than content. This paper highlights the striking parallels between Aristotle’s use of symmetry arguments in cosmology and instances of Noether’s First Theorem in contemporary physics. Both observe simple motion, find symmetries in that motion, argue from those symmetries to notions of (...)
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  3. Bessarion’s Conception of Platonic Psychology: The Immortality of the Soul in the Phaedrus (245c5-246a2).Athanasia Theodoropoulou - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, Vol. 70: Renaissance and Modern Philosophy.
    Bessarion’s major philosophical treatise In Calumniatorem Platonis is a systematic approach to Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy written in response to George of Trebizond’s Comparatio Philosophorum Aristotelis et Platonis, which attacked Plato’s authority and proclaimed Aristotle’s superiority. A striking example of this is Bessarion’s attempt to defend Plato against George of Trebizond’s accusation that Plato did not offer sound arguments in favor of the immortality of the soul. In this article, I focus on Plato’s proof of the immortality of the soul (...)
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  4. Why Can't Geometers Cut Themselves on the Acutely Angled Objects of Their Proofs? Aristotle on Shape as an Impure Power.Brad Berman - 2017 - Méthexis 29 (1):89-106.
    For Aristotle, the shape of a physical body is perceptible per se (DA II.6, 418a8-9). As I read his position, shape is thus a causal power, as a physical body can affect our sense organs simply in virtue of possessing it. But this invites a challenge. If shape is an intrinsically powerful property, and indeed an intrinsically perceptible one, then why are the objects of geometrical reasoning, as such, inert and imperceptible? I here address Aristotle’s answer to that problem, focusing (...)
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  5. Capacities and the Eternal in Metaphysics Θ.8 and De Caelo.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (1):88-126.
    _ Source: _Volume 60, Issue 1, pp 88 - 126 The dominant interpretation of Metaphysics Θ.8 commits Aristotle to the claim that the heavenly bodies’ eternal movements are not the exercises of capacities. Against this, I argue that these movements are the result of necessarily exercised capacities. I clarify what it is for a heavenly body to possess a nature and argue that a body’s nature cannot be a final cause unless the natural body possesses capacities that are exercised for (...)
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  6. Simplicius: On Aristotle, On the Heavens 3.1-7. Ian Mueller Trans. [REVIEW]Sean Michael Pead Coughlin - 2011 - Aestimatio 8:34-40.
    Review of Simplicius: On Aristotle, On the Heavens 3.1-7, trans. Ian Mueller, London: Duckworth, 2009.
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  7. Aristotle De Caelo. [REVIEW]James Longrigg - 1968 - The Classical Review 18 (2):166-168.
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  8. Aristotle.--On the Heavens by W. K. C. Guthrie. [REVIEW]George Sarton - 1940 - Isis 32:136-136.
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  9. Aristotle De Caelo Aristotelis De Caelo libri IV. Recognovit brevique adnotatione critica instruxit D. J. Allan. (Scr. Class. Bibl. Oxon.) Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1936. Cloth, 7s. 6d. [REVIEW]W. K. C. Guthrie - 1937 - The Classical Review 51 (01):15-16.