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  1. Conhecimento e Definição no Mênon de Platão.Davi Heckert César Bastos - 2020 - Kinesis 12 (31):172-185.
    Through detailed analysis of Plato’s Meno, I identify and set general argumentative rules (useful both to scientists and philosophers) concerning how to use definitions. I show how the character Socrates establishes strong requirements for knowledge in general, i.e., that the knowledge of the definition of a thing must be prior to the knowledge of properties or instances of that thing. Socrate’s requirements and the way he characterizes a definition (as coextensive to the definiendum, not circular, true and explanatorily relevant) lead (...)
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  2. ‘Pushing Through’ in Plato’s Sophist: A New Reading of the Parity Assumption.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):159-188.
    At a crucial juncture in Plato’s Sophist, when the interlocutors have reached their deepest confusion about being and not-being, the Eleatic Visitor proclaims that there is yet hope. Insofar as they clarify one, he maintains, they will equally clarify the other. But what justifies the Visitor’s seemingly oracular prediction? A new interpretation explains how the Visitor’s hope is in fact warranted by the peculiar aporia they find themselves in. The passage describes a broader pattern of ‘exploring both sides’ that lends (...)
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  3. More Than a Reductio: Plato's Method in the Parmenides and Lysis.Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Études Platoniciennes 15.
    Plato’s Parmenides and Lysis have a surprising amount in common from a methodological standpoint. Both systematically employ a method that I call ‘exploring both sides’, a philosophical method for encouraging further inquiry and comprehensively understanding the truth. Both have also been held in suspicion by interpreters for containing what looks uncomfortably similar to sophistic methodology. I argue that the methodological connections across these and other dialogues relieve those suspicions and push back against a standard developmentalist story about Plato’s method. This (...)
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  4. Review of Samuel Scolnicov, Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, Edited by Harold Tarrant. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):549-550.
    This volume, a lightly-edited version of Professor Samuel Scolnicov’s 1974 Ph.D. thesis, is a fitting tribute to his impressive career. It will perhaps be most useful for those interested in better understanding Scolnicov’s work and his views on Plato as a whole, not least for the comprehensive list of his publications that requires a full twelve pages of print. Scholars with an interest in Plato’s method of hypothesis will also find some useful remarks on key passages in the Meno, Phaedo, (...)
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  5. The Meno and the Second Problem of Geometry At 86e1.Samet Bagce - 2016 - Φιλοσοφια: International Journal of Philosophy 17 (1).
    The aim of this paper is two-fold: firstly, to argue for the claim that the two problems of geometry presented in the Meno seems to be connected to each other, and secondly, to offer, in connection with the first claim, a conjecture concerning the nature of the second problem of geometry brought up in the dialogue at 86e. This paper offers, in particular, a historical reconstruction of how we should understand this problem of construction in geometry.
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  6. Review of Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's Meno, Phaedo, and Republic. [REVIEW]David Ebrey - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 11.
  7. Review: Hugh H. Benson. Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's Meno, Phaedo, and Republic. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. 328 Pages; $65.00/Hardcover. [REVIEW]Yale Weiss - 2016 - Philosophical Forum 47 (1):25-29.
  8. Counting the Hypotheses in Plato's Parmenides.Ron Polansky & Joe Cimakasky - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (3):229-243.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  9. Recollection and the Mathematician's Method in Plato's Meno.E. Landry - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):143-169.
    I argue that recollection, in Plato's Meno , should not be taken as a method, and, if it is taken as a myth, it should not be taken as a mere myth. Neither should it be taken as a truth, a priori or metaphorical. In contrast to such views, I argue that recollection ought to be taken as an hypothesis for learning. Thus, the only methods demonstrated in the Meno are the elenchus and the hypothetical, or mathematical, method. What Plato's (...)
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  10. Christopher Rowe's Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):55-62.
    The review argues that Plato makes a valid distinction between inferior hypothetical and superior unhypothetical methods. Given the distinction, the book confuses the hypothetical for unhypothetical dialectic.
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  11. Dialectic and Plato's Method of Hypothesis.Miriam Newton Byrd - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (2):141 - 158.
  12. Instances of Decision Theory in Plato’s Alcibiades Major and Minor and in Xenophon’s Memorabilia.Andre Archie - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):365-380.
    This essay discusses Socrates’ use of hypothetical choices as an early version of what was to become in the twentieth century the discipline of decision theory as expressed by one of its prominent proponents, F. P. Ramsey. Socrates’ use of hypothetical choices and thought experiments in the dialogues is a way of reassuring himself of an interlocutor’s philosophical potential. For example, to assess just how far Alcibiades is willing to go to attain his goal of being a great Athenian leader, (...)
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  13. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo. Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95-115.
    This paper aims to achieve a better understanding of what Socrates means by "συμφωνε[unrepresentable symbol]ν" in the sections of the "Phaedo" in which he uses the word, and how its use contributes both to the articulation of the hypothetical method and the proof of the soul's immortality. Section I sets out the well-known problems for the most obvious readings of the relation, while Sections II and III argue against two remedies for these problems, the first an interpretation of what the (...)
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  14. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo. Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95 - 115.
    This paper aims to achieve a better understanding of what Socrates means by "συμφωνε[unrepresentable symbol]ν" in the sections of the "Phaedo" in which he uses the word, and how its use contributes both to the articulation of the hypothetical method and the proof of the soul's immortality. Section I sets out the well-known problems for the most obvious readings of the relation, while Sections II and III argue against two remedies for these problems, the first an interpretation of what the (...)
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  15. Logos and Forms in Phaedo 96a–102a.Panagiotis Thanassas - 2003 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 8 (1):1-19.
    Socrates’ autobiography in Phaedo signifies an attempt to incorporate earlier philosophical thinking in a progressive evolution culminating in the Platonic theory of Forms. In the “second sailing”, the “hypothesis of Forms” is not a hypothetical assumption, an arbitrary claim or conjecture, but something to be “sup-posed” prior to any further knowledge or statement. The careful reading and reconstruction of the famous simile of the “sun in eclipse” leads to crucial consequences concerning the attempt to “take refuge in the logoi”. The (...)
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  16. "To an Unhypothetical First Principle" in Plato's "Republic".Dirk C. Baltzly - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):149 - 165.
  17. “Συμφωνειν” in Plato's Phaedo.Jyl Gentzler - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):265 - 276.
    In Socrates' account of his earlier investigations into the nature of causation in the "Phaedo", he describes a method that uses hypotheses. He posited as true those propositions that appeared to harmonize ("sumphonein") with his hypothesis and as false those propositions that failed to harmonize with his hypothesis. Earlier commentators on this passage have maintained that it is impossible to give a univocal reading of the occurrences of "sumphonein"' such that the method that Socrates describes is at all reasonable. It (...)
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  18. “Συμφωνειν” in Plato's Phaedo.Jyl Gentzler - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):265-276.
    In Socrates' account of his earlier investigations into the nature of causation in the "Phaedo", he describes a method that uses hypotheses. He posited as true those propositions that appeared to harmonize ("sumphonein") with his hypothesis and as false those propositions that failed to harmonize with his hypothesis. Earlier commentators on this passage have maintained that it is impossible to give a univocal reading of the occurrences of "sumphonein"' such that the method that Socrates describes is at all reasonable. It (...)
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  19. Plato's Geometric Hypothesis: Meno 86e-87b.Judith I. Meyers - 1988 - Apeiron 21 (3):173 - 180.
  20. Plato's Reasoning and the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis.T. D. Crawford - 1982 - Metaphilosophy 13 (3-4):217-227.
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  21. The Deuteros Plous, Simmias' Speech, and Socrates' Answer to Cebes in Plato's 'Phaedo'.Donald Ross - 1982 - Hermes 110 (1):19-25.
    There is growing recognition in Phaedo scholarship of a parallel between the deuteros plous passage and the introduction to Simmias' speech: both speak of attempting to discover or to learn the truth about things, and then, if that proves impossible, to resort to divine or human logoi, the former being the "safer" of the two. It is contended that that model governs Socrates reply to Cebes: he first tried to discover the truth about causes by himself; then he tried to (...)
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  22. Plato's Parmenides: The Structure of the First Hypothesis.James W. Forrester - 1972 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 10 (1):1-14.
  23. Plato’s Analytic Method . By Kenneth M. Sayre . (Chicago and London : University of Chicago Press. 1969. Pp. Xi + 250. Price £4.40). [REVIEW]R. C. Cross - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (84):261-262.
  24. Plato's Meno, 86-89.Lynn E. Rose - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (January):1-8.
    This paper examines socrates' method for determining whether virtue is taught, And discusses some of the opposing interpretations that have been offered (e.G., By robinson and hackforth). Some major conclusions are: that hypotheses that have been deduced from other hypotheses can still be called hypotheses; that it is false that there can be only one hypothesis per argument; and that the several hypotheses in a given argument need not all be hypothesized with the same degree of confidence.
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  25. Plato's Meno, 86-89.Lynn E. Rose - 1970 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1).
  26. Plato's Analytic Method.Kenneth M. Sayre - 1969 - University of Chicago Press.
    Applying the analytical methods of modern logic to problems of interpretation in Plato, the author traces the development of Plato's analytic method from the crude form expressed in the Phaedo to the considerably more sophisticated and powerful techniques practiced in the later methodological dialogues.
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  27. Plato's Unhypothetical Principle.Lynn E. Rose - 1966 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 4 (3):189-198.
  28. The Deuteros Plous in Plato’s Phaedo.Lynn E. Rose - 1966 - The Monist 50 (3):464-473.
    A distressing number of philosophers and classicists think that the deuteros plous or “second best” mentioned at Phaedo 99c9-dl is the hypothetical method. Many of them will even tell you that Plato says the hypothetical method is the deuteros plous, and that they are not merely interpreting his meaning. They usually back off, however, when challenged on this point, for there jus isn’t any such statement by Plato. Nor, I think, does Plato give us any justification at all for taking (...)
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  29. Definition and Hypothesis in Plato'smeno(II).Laura Grimm - 1964 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 7 (1-4):227-230.
  30. Definition and Hypothesis in Plato'smeno(III).Arne Naess - 1964 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 7 (1-4):231-234.
  31. On Hypothesis in the Cratylus as an Indication of the Place of the Dialogue in the Sequence of Dialogues.Lynn E. Rose - 1964 - Phronesis 9 (2):114-116.
  32. Socrates' Method of Hypothesis in the Phaedo.Paul Plass - 1960 - Phronesis 5 (2):103-115.