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David Wasserman [96]David T. Wasserman [7]
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  1.  24
    What Justifies the Allocation of Health Care Resources to Patients with Disorders of Consciousness?Andrew Peterson, Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2-3):127-139.
    This paper critically engages ethical issues in the allocation of novel, and potentially costly, health care resources to patients with disorders of consciousness. First, we review potential benefits of novel health care resources for patients and their families and outline preliminary considerations to address concerns about cost. We then address two problems regarding the allocation of health care resources to patients with disorders of consciousness: (1) the problem of uncertain moral status; and (2) the problem of accurately measuring the welfare (...)
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  2.  17
    A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents.Stephanie C. Chen & David T. Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):3-18.
    Noninvasive, prenatal whole genome sequencing may be a technological reality in the near future, making available a vast array of genetic information early in pregnancy at no risk to the fetus or mother. Many worry that the timing, safety, and ease of the test will lead to informational overload and reproductive consumerism. The prevailing response among commentators has been to restrict conditions eligible for testing based on medical severity, which imposes disputed value judgments and devalues those living with eligible conditions. (...)
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  3. How to Allocate Scarce Health Resources Without Discriminating Against People with Disabilities.Tyler M. John, Joseph Millum & David Wasserman - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (2):161-186.
    One widely used method for allocating health care resources involves the use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to rank treatments in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. CEA has been criticized for discriminating against people with disabilities by valuing their lives less than those of non-disabled people. Avoiding discrimination seems to lead to the ’QALY trap’: we cannot value saving lives equally and still value raising quality of life. This paper reviews existing responses to the QALY trap and argues that all (...)
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  4.  5
    A New Ethical Framework for Assessing the Unique Challenges of Fetal Therapy Trials: Response to Commentaries.Saskia Hendriks, Christine Grady, David Wasserman, David Wendler, Diana W. Bianchi & Benjamin Berkman - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (3):45-61.
    New fetal therapies offer important prospects for improving health. However, having to consider both the fetus and the pregnant woman makes the risk–benefit analysis of fetal therapy trials challenging. Regulatory guidance is limited, and proposed ethical frameworks are overly restrictive or permissive. We propose a new ethical framework for fetal therapy research. First, we argue that considering only biomedical benefits fails to capture all relevant interests. Thus, we endorse expanding the considered benefits to include evidence-based psychosocial effects of fetal therapies. (...)
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  5.  79
    Brain–Computer Interfaces and Disability: Extending Embodiment, Reducing Stigma?Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):37-40.
  6.  25
    Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce?David Benatar & David Wasserman - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    While procreation is ubiquitous, attention to the ethical issues involved in creating children is relatively rare. In Debating Procreation, David Benatar and David Wasserman take opposing views on this important question. David Benatar argues for the anti-natalist view that it is always wrong to bring new people into existence. He argues that coming into existence is always a serious harm and that even if it were not always so, the risk of serious harm is sufficiently great to make procreation wrong. (...)
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  7.  93
    Disability, Difference, Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy.Anita Silvers, David Wasserman, Mary B. Mahowald & Lawrence C. Becker - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    How should we respond to individuals with disabilities? What does it mean to be disabled? Over fifty million Americans, from neonates to the fragile elderly, are disabled. Some people say they have the right to full social participation, while others repudiate such claims as delusive or dangerous. In this compelling book, three experts in ethics, medicine, and the law address pressing disability questions in bioethics and public policy. Anita Silvers, David Wasserman, and Mary B. Mahowald test important theories of justice (...)
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  8.  56
    Harming Future Persons: Ethics, Genetics and the Nonidentity Problem.David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.) - 2009 - Springer.
    This collection of essays investigates the obligations we have in respect of future persons, from our own future offspring to distant future generations.
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  9.  70
    Cognitive Disability and Moral Status.David Wasserman - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10. The Nonidentity Problem, Disability, and the Role Morality of Prospective Parents.David Wasserman - 2005 - Ethics 116 (1):132-152.
  11.  39
    Deep Brain Stimulation, Historicism, and Moral Responsibility.Daniel Sharp & David Wasserman - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (2):173-185.
    Although philosophers have explored several connections between neuroscience and moral responsibility, the issue of how real-world neurological modifications, such as Deep Brain Stimulation, impact moral responsibility has received little attention. In this article, we draw on debates about the relevance of history and manipulation to moral responsibility to argue that certain kinds of neurological modification can diminish the responsibility of the agents so modified. We argue for a historicist position - a version of the history-sensitive reflection view - and defend (...)
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  12. Understanding the Relationship Between Disability and Well-Being.David Wasserman & Adrienne Asch - 2013 - In Jerome Bickenbach, Franziska Felder & Barbara Schmitz (eds.), Disability and the Good Human Life. Cambridge University Press. pp. 139-67.
     
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  13.  12
    Recommendations for Responsible Development and Application of Neurotechnologies.Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Laura Specker Sullivan, Anna Wexler, Blaise Agüera Y. Arcas, Guoqiang Bi, Jose M. Carmena, Joseph J. Fins, Phoebe Friesen, Jack Gallant, Jane E. Huggins, Philipp Kellmeyer, Adam Marblestone, Christine Mitchell, Erik Parens, Michelle Pham, Alan Rubel, Norihiro Sadato, Mina Teicher, David Wasserman, Meredith Whittaker, Jonathan Wolpaw & Rafael Yuste - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (3):365-386.
    Advancements in novel neurotechnologies, such as brain computer interfaces and neuromodulatory devices such as deep brain stimulators, will have profound implications for society and human rights. While these technologies are improving the diagnosis and treatment of mental and neurological diseases, they can also alter individual agency and estrange those using neurotechnologies from their sense of self, challenging basic notions of what it means to be human. As an international coalition of interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners, we examine these challenges and make (...)
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  14.  71
    Can a Nonconsequentialist Count Lives?David Wasserman & Alan Strudler - 2003 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (1):71-94.
  15.  95
    Let Them Eat Chances: Probability and Distributive Justice: David Wasserman.David Wasserman - 1996 - Economics and Philosophy 12 (1):29-49.
    Jon Elster reports that in 1940, and again in 1970, the U.S. draft lottery was challenged for falling short of the legally mandated ‘random selection’. On both occasions, the physical mixing of the lots appeared to be incomplete, since the birth dates were clustered in a way that would have been extremely unlikely if the lots were fully mixed. There appears to have been no suspicion on either occasion that the deficiency in the mixing was intended, known, or believed to (...)
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  16. The Numbers Problem.Nien-hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & David Wasserman - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):352-372.
  17.  42
    How to (Consistently) Reject the Options Argument.Stephen M. Campbell, Joseph A. Stramondo & David Wasserman - 2021 - Utilitas 33 (2):237-245.
    It is commonly thought that disability is a harm or “bad difference” because having a disability restricts valuable options in life. In his recent essay “Disability, Options and Well-Being,” Thomas Crawley offers a novel defense of this style of reasoning and argues that we and like-minded critics of this brand of argument are guilty of an inconsistency. Our aim in this article is to explain why our view avoids inconsistency, to challenge Crawley's positive defense of the Options Argument, and to (...)
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  18. Natural and Social Inequality.David Wasserman & Sean Aas - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (5):576-601.
    _ Source: _Page Count 26 This paper examines the moral import of a distinction between natural and social inequalities. Following Thomas Nagel, it argues for a “denatured” distinction that relies less on the biological vs. social causation of inequalities than on the idea that society is morally responsible for some inequalities but not others. It maintains that securing fair equality of opportunity by eliminating such social inequalities has particularly high priority in distributive justice. Departing from Nagel, it argues that society (...)
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  19.  51
    When Bad People Do Good Things: Will Moral Enhancement Make the World a Better Place?David Wasserman - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):374-375.
    In his thoughtful defence of very modest moral enhancement, David DeGrazia1 makes the following assumption: ‘Behavioural improvement is highly desirable in the interest of making the world a better place and securing better lives for human beings and other sentient beings’. Later in the paper, he gives a list of some psychological characteristics that ‘all reasonable people can agree … represent moral defects’. I think I am a reasonable person, and I agree that most if not all items on the (...)
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  20.  19
    Disability, Difference, and Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy.Anita Silvers, David Wasserman & Mary B. Mahowald - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):209-213.
  21.  61
    A Symmetrical View of Disability and Enhancement.Stephen M. Campbell & David Wasserman - forthcoming - In Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Disability and enhancement are often treated as opposing concepts. To become disabled in some respect is to move away from those who are enhanced in that same respect; to become enhanced is to move away from the corresponding state of disability. This chapter examines how best to understand the concepts of disability and enhancement in this symmetrical way. After considering various candidates, two types of accounts are identified as the most promising: welfarist accounts and typical-functioning accounts. The authors ultimately defend (...)
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  22. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.Luis A. Camacho, Colin Campbell, David A. Crocker, Eleonora Curlo, Herman E. Daly, Eliezer Diamond, Robert Goodland, Allen L. Hammond, Nathan Keyfitz, Robert E. Lane, Judith Lichtenberg, David Luban, James A. Nash, Martha C. Nussbaum, ThomasW Pogge, Mark Sagoff, Juliet B. Schor, Michael Schudson, Jerome M. Segal, Amartya Sen, Alan Strudler, Paul L. Wachtel, Paul E. Waggoner, David Wasserman & Charles K. Wilber (eds.) - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
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  23.  14
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability.Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    Disability raises profound and fundamental issues: questions about human embodiment and well-being; dignity, respect, justice and equality; personal and social identity. It raises pressing questions for educational, health, reproductive, and technology policy, and confronts the scope and direction of the human and civil rights movements. Yet it is only recently that disability has become the subject of the sustained and rigorous philosophical inquiry that it deserves. The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability is the first comprehensive volume on the subject. (...)
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  24. Quality of Life and Human Difference: Genetic Testing, Health Care, and Disability.David Wasserman, Jerome Bickenbach & Robert Wachbroit (eds.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This study brings together two important literatures together in the one volume. One concerns the role of quality assessments in social policy, especially health policy. The second concerns ethical and social issues raised by prenatal testing for disability. Hitherto, these two literatures have had little contact with each other: few scholars have written about both, or have compared the two domains in a systematic way, while people with disabilities and disability scholars are underrepresented in recent discussion on health policy and (...)
     
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  25. Harms to Future People and Procreative Intentions.David T. Wasserman - 2009 - In David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer. pp. 265--285.
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  26.  3
    Restricting Access, Stigmatizing Disability?David Wasserman & Noah Berens - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):25-27.
    In their comprehensive article, Bayefsky and Berkman outline a framework for limiting access to certain types of fetal genetic information through professional self-regulation. Given the rap...
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  27.  35
    Devoured by Our Own Children: The Possibility and Peril of Moral Status Enhancement.David Wasserman - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (2):78-79.
    Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu1 warn of our destruction by the cognitively enhanced beings we create. Now, in a fascinating paper, Nicholas Agar2 warns of an even more disturbing prospect: cognitively enhanced beings may be entitled to sacrifice us for their own ends. These post-humans would likely conclude that they had higher moral status than we mere human beings, and we would have good reason to defer to their vastly superior moral knowledge. We would lack even the consolation of moral (...)
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  28.  27
    Neuroethical Concerns About Moderating Traumatic Memories.S. Matthew Liao & David T. Wasserman - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):38 – 40.
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  29.  55
    Disability and Justice.David Wasserman - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  30.  1
    Genetic Prospects: Essays on Biotechnology, Ethics, and Public Policy.Harold W. Baillie, William A. Galston, Sara Goering, Deborah Hellman, Mark Sagoff, Paul B. Thompson, Robert Wachbroit, David T. Wasserman & Richard M. Zaner (eds.) - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The essays in this volume apply philosophical analysis to address three kinds of questions: What are the implications of genetic science for our understanding of nature? What might it influence in our conception of human nature? What challenges does genetic science pose for specific issues of private conduct or public policy?
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  31.  61
    Discrimination and Disability.Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. New York: Routledge.
  32.  16
    Genetics and Criminal Behavior.David Wasserman & Robert Wachbroit (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 2001 volume a group of leading philosophers address some of the basic conceptual, methodological and ethical issues raised by genetic research into criminal behavior. The essays explore the complexities of tracing any genetic influence on criminal, violent or antisocial behavior; the varieties of interpretations to which evidence of such influences is subject; and the relevance of such influences to the moral and legal appraisal of criminal conduct. The distinctive features of this collection are: first, that it advances public (...)
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  33.  25
    Regulating Toxic Substances: A Philosophy of Science and the Law. [REVIEW]David T. Wasserman - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):674-676.
  34.  68
    Justifying Self-Defense.David Wasserman - 1987 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 16 (4):356-378.
  35.  29
    Considering Consent to Research for Patients in Chronic Pain and With Mental Illnesses.Caroline J. Huang & David Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):51-52.
  36. Autonomy-Based Criticisms of the Patient Preference Predictor.E. J. Jardas, David Wasserman & David Wendler - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (5):304-310.
    The patient preference predictor is a proposed computer-based algorithm that would predict the treatment preferences of decisionally incapacitated patients. Incorporation of a PPP into the decision-making process has the potential to improve implementation of the substituted judgement standard by providing more accurate predictions of patients’ treatment preferences than reliance on surrogates alone. Yet, critics argue that methods for making treatment decisions for incapacitated patients should be judged on a number of factors beyond simply providing them with the treatments they would (...)
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  37.  43
    Seeing Responsibility:Can Neuroimaging Teach Us Anything About Moral and Legal Responsibility?David Wasserman & Josephine Johnston - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s2):S37-S49.
  38. 'Healthy' Human Embryos and Reproduction Making Embryos Healthy or Making Healthy Embryos: How Much of a Difference Between Prenatal Treatment and Selection?Adrienne Asch & David Wasserman - 2010 - In The 'Healthy' Embryo: Social, Biomedical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives. pp. 201-18.
  39.  95
    Agents, Impartiality, and the Priority of Claims Over Duties: Diagnosing Why Thomson Still Gets the Trolley Problem Wrong by Appeal to the “Mechanics of Claims”. [REVIEW]Alec Walen & David Wasserman - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):545-571.
    Judith Jarvis Thomson recently argued that it is impermissible for a bystander to turn a runaway trolley from five onto one. But she also argues that a trolley driver is required to do just that. We believe that her argument is flawed in three important ways. She fails to give proper weight to (a) an agent¹s claims not to be required to act in ways he does not want to, (b) impartiality in the weighing of competing patient-claims, and (c) the (...)
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  40. Philosophy and Geography Iii: Philosophies of Place.Philip Brey, Lee Caragata, James Dickinson, David Glidden, Sara Gottlieb, Bruce Hannon, Ian Howard, Jeff Malpas, Katya Mandoki, Jonathan Maskit, Bryan G. Norton, Roger Paden, David Roberts, Holmes Rolston Iii, Izhak Schnell, Jonathon M. Smith, David Wasserman & Mick Womersley (eds.) - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    A growing literature testifies to the persistence of place as an incorrigible aspect of human experience, identity, and morality. Place is a common ground for thought and action, a community of experienced particulars that avoids solipsism and universalism. It draws us into the philosophy of the ordinary, into familiarity as a form of knowledge, into the wisdom of proximity. Each of these essays offers a philosophy of place, and reminds us that such philosophies ultimately decide how we make, use, and (...)
     
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  41.  27
    Is There Value in Identifying Individual Genetic Predispositions to Violence?David Wasserman - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):24-33.
    In this article I want to ask what we should do, either collectively or individually, if we could identify by genetic and family profding the 12% of the male population likely to commit almost half the violent crime in our society. What if we could identify some individuals in that 12% not only at birth, but in utero, or before implantation? I will explain the source of these figures later; for now, I will use them only to provide a concrete (...)
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  42.  53
    The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability.David Wasserman - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (2):251-256.
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  43.  10
    A Case for Greater Risk Tolerance in Internet Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Comment on Chalghoumi Et Al.David Wasserman - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):223-226.
    This comment argues for increased tolerance of privacy risks in the Internet activity of adults with intellectual disabilities. Excessive caution about such risks denies those individuals not only the great benefits of Internet use but also the difficult but valuable experiences of loss, disappointment, and hurt associated with those risks. A level of risk-aversion appropriate for small children will be disrespectful for adults with intellectual disabilities. To the extent that additional safeguards are justified, they are better achieved through individualized security (...)
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  44.  65
    Hare on de Dicto Betterness and Prospective Parents.David Wasserman - 2008 - Ethics 118 (3):529-535.
  45.  28
    Challenges of Genetic Testing in Adolescents with Cardiac Arrhythmia Syndromes.Lilian Liou Cohen, Marina Stolerman, Christine Walsh, David Wasserman & Siobhan M. Dolan - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):163-167.
    The ability to sequence individual genomes is leading to the identification of an increasing number of genetic risk factors for serious diseases. Knowledge of these risk factors can often provide significant medical and psychological benefit, but also raises complex ethical and social issues. This paper focuses on one area of rapid progress: the identification of mutations causing long QT syndrome and other cardiac channel disorders, which can explain some previously unexplained deaths in infants (SIDS) and children and adults (SUDS) and (...)
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  46.  60
    Issues in the Pharmacological Induction of Emotions.David Wasserman & S. Matthew Liao - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):178-192.
    abstract In this paper, we examine issues raised by the possibility of regulating emotions through pharmacological means. We argue that emotions induced through these means can be authentic phenomenologically, and that the manner of inducing them need not make them any less our own than emotions arising 'naturally'. We recognize that in taking drugs to induce emotions, one may lose opportunities for self-knowledge; act narcissistically; or treat oneself as a mere means. But we propose that there are circumstances in which (...)
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  47. Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries.Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
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  48.  57
    The First Dogma of Deontology: The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing and the Notion of a Say.Alan Strudler & David Wasserman - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 80 (1):51 - 67.
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  49.  71
    Selecting for Disability: Acceptable Lives, Acceptable Reasons.David Wasserman & Adrienne Asch - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):30 - 31.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page 30-31, August 2012.
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  50.  41
    A More "Inclusive" Approach to Enhancement and Disability.David Wasserman & Stephen M. Campbell - 2017 - In Jessica Flanigan & Terry Price (eds.), The Ethics of Ability and Enhancement. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 25-38.
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