Philosophy of Economics

Edited by Anna Alexandrova (Cambridge University)
Assistant editor: Jack Wright (University of Gothenburg)
About this topic
Summary Philosophy of economics is a study of any philosophical issue that arises in connection with the discipline of economics. Currently it has three core areas: foundations, methodology and ethics. Foundations of economics encompass conceptual and metaphysical questions such as the nature of rationality and social ontology, seeking to clarify what we study when we study economics (preferences, individuals, institutions, societies etc?) and their properties and relations to each other. Methodology of economics, following on the traditional questions in philosophy of science, is concerned with the nature of knowledge that can be attained about the economy and its sources.  The ethical side of philosophy of economics is a study of normative issues such as justice, efficiency, equality, welfare, paternalism, coercion and such, that arise at the intersection of political philosophy and welfare economics.
Key works Daniel Hausman is responsible for kickstarting much of contemporary philosophy of economics. Hausman 2008 is a comprehensive encyclopedia article. Hausman 1984 is an anthology of classic essays from to J.S Mill and Marx to the present day. Hausman et al 2006 is a seminal study of normative assumptions in economics and their critical study. Hausman 1992 started and still informs many discussions in methodology of economics. Reiss 2009 presents an updated agenda. Mäki 2001 is a collection on the ontology of economics.
Introductions There is now a textbook in philosophy of economics: Reiss 2013. Other good introductions to philosophy of economics are just introductions to philosophy of social science: for example, Rosenberg 1988, Risjord 2014, and Elster 2007.
Related
Subcategories
See also
History/traditions: Philosophy of Economics

Contents
13008 found
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  1. Epistemic problems in Hayek’s defence of free markets.Jonathan Benson - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy:1-23.
    Friedrich von Hayek’s classical liberalism argued that free markets allow individuals the greatest opportunity to achieve their ends. This paper develops an internal critique of this claim. It argues that once externalities are introduced, the forms of economic knowledge Hayek thought to undermine government action and orthodox utilitarianism also rule out relative welfarist assessments of more or less regulated markets. Given the pervasiveness of externalities in modern economies, Hayek will frequently be unable to make comparative welfarist claims, or he must (...)
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  2. Fragile Futures: The Uncertain Economics of Disasters, Pandemics, and Climate Change, Vito Tanzi. Cambridge University Press, 2021. [REVIEW]Joe Roussos - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):250-256.
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  3. Fitting Things Together: Coherence and the Requirements of Structural Rationality, Alex Worsnip, Oxford University Press, 2021, xvii + 335 pages. [REVIEW]Richard Bradley - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):228-233.
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  4. Exploitation as Domination: Why Capitalism is Unjust, Nicholas Vrousalis, Oxford University Press, 2023, 224 pages. [REVIEW]Lillian Cicerchia - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):239-243.
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  5. Abstract rationality: the ‘logical’ structure of attitudes.Franz Dietrich, Antonios Staras & Robert Sugden - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):12-41.
    We present an abstract model of rationality that focuses on structural properties of attitudes. Rationality requires coherence between your attitudes, such as your beliefs, values, and intentions. We define three 'logical' conditions on attitudes: consistency, completeness, and closedness. They parallel the familiar logical conditions on beliefs, but contrast with standard rationality conditions like preference transitivity. We establish a formal correspondence between our logical conditions and standard rationality conditions. Addressing John Broome's programme 'rationality through reasoning', we formally characterize how you can (...)
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  6. Subjective total comparative evaluations.Daniel M. Hausman - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):212-225.
    In Preference, Value, Choice, and Welfare, I argued, among other things, that preferences in economics are and ought to be total subjective comparative evaluations, that the theory of rational choice is a reformulation of everyday folk-psychological explanations and predictions of behaviour, and that revealed preference theory is completely untenable. All three of these theses have been challenged in essays by Erik Angner (2018), Francesco Guala (2019) and Johanna Thoma (2021a, 2021b). This essay responds to these criticisms and defends these three (...)
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  7. Reply to Hausman.Johanna Thoma - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):226-227.
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  8. Rational updating at the crossroads.Silvia Milano & Andrés Perea - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):190-211.
    In this paper we explore the absentminded driver problem using two different scenarios. In the first scenario we assume that the driver is capable of reasoning about his degree of absentmindedness before he hits the highway. This leads to a Savage-style model where the states are mutually exclusive and the act-state independence is in place. In the second we employ centred possibilities, by modelling the states (i.e. the events about which the driver is uncertain) as the possible final destinations indexed (...)
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  9. Description invariance: a rational principle for human agents.Sarah A. Fisher - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):42-54.
    This article refines a foundational tenet of rational choice theory known as the principle of description invariance. Attempts to apply this principle to human agents with imperfect knowledge have paid insufficient attention to two aspects: first, agents’ epistemic situations, i.e. whether and when they recognize alternative descriptions of an object to be equivalent; and second, the individuation of objects of description, i.e. whether and when objects count as the same or different. An important consequence is that many apparent ‘framing effects’ (...)
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  10. A social-status rationale for repugnant market transactions.Patrick Harless & Romans Pancs - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):102-137.
    Individuals often deem market transactions in sex, human organs and surrogacy, among others, repugnant. Repugnance norms can be explained by appealing to social-status concerns. We study an exchange economy in which agents abhor consumption dominance: one’s social status is compromised if one consumes less of every good than someone else does. Dominance may be forestalled by partitioning goods into submarkets and then invoking the repugnance norms that proscribe trade across these submarkets. Dominance may also be forestalled if individuals strategically ‘overconsume’ (...)
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  11. Impartiality and democracy: an objection to political exchange.Matthew T. Jeffers - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):166-189.
    The philosophical debate concerning political exchange has largely been confined to debating the desirability of vote trading; where individuals can sell their votes or buy votes from others. However, I show that the vote credit systems prevalent in public choice theory entirely avoid the common objections to political exchange that afflict vote trading proposals. Namely, vote credit systems avoid equality concerns and inalienability concerns. I offer an alternative critique to formal mechanisms that encourage political exchange by drawing on the role (...)
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  12. Team reasoning cannot be viewed as a payoff transformation.Andrew M. Colman - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):1-11.
    In a recent article in this journal, Duijf claims to have proved that team reasoning can be viewed as a payoff transformation. His formalization mimics team reasoning but ignores its essential agency switch. The possibility of such a payoff transformation was never in doubt, does not imply that team reasoning can be viewed as a payoff transformation, and makes no sense in a game in which payoffs represent players’ utilities. A theorem is proved here that a simpler and more intuitive (...)
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  13. The Welfare Diffusion Objection to Prioritarianism.Tomi Francis - 2024 - Economics and Philosophy 40 (1):55-76.
    According to the Welfare Diffusion Objection, we should reject Prioritarianism because it implies the ‘desirability of welfare diffusion’: the claim that it can be better for there to be less total wellbeing spread thinly between a larger total number of people, rather than for there to be more total wellbeing, spread more generously between a smaller total number of people. I argue that while Prioritarianism does not directly imply the desirability of welfare diffusion, Prioritarians are nevertheless implicitly committed to certain (...)
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  14. Can heterodox economics make a difference? Conversations with key thinkers.Danielle Guizzo - 2023 - Journal of Economic Methodology 31 (1):58-62.
    Is there anything left to be said about ‘heterodox economics’? Can it make a difference in today’s economic debate? And if so, how would it displace existing theories and policy recommendations? Ho...
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  15. Permissible preference purification: on context-dependent choices and decisive welfare judgements in behavioural welfare economics.Måns Abrahamson - 2023 - Journal of Economic Methodology 31 (1):17-35.
    Behavioural welfare economics has lately been challenged on account of its use of the satisfaction of true preferences as a normative criterion. The critique contests what is taken to be an implicit assumption in the literature, namely that true preferences are context-independent. This assumption is considered not only unjustified in the behavioural welfare economics literature but unjustifiable – true preferences are argued to be, at least sometimes, context-dependent. This article explores the implications of this ‘critique of the inner rational agent’. (...)
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  16. Ontological wars in economics: the return of supervenience.Alexandre Müller Fonseca - 2023 - Journal of Economic Methodology 31 (1):1-16.
    In this article, I contest Brian Epstein’s argument (2014) against the applicability of global supervenience to relate micro and macroeconomic properties. Epstein rejects supervenience via a causal-chain relation inside the macroeconomic set in his criticism. Accordingly, the rise of the macro set is fixed by a weather event without any mediation from the realm of microeconomics. As it stands, this idea would demonstrate the autonomy of macroeconomics from microeconomics. However, as I intend to argue, in Epstein’s weather-cases scenarios, the corresponding (...)
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  17. Equilibrium modeling in economics: a design-based defense.Armin W. Schulz - 2024 - Journal of Economic Methodology 31 (1):36-53.
    Several authors have recently argued that the excessive focus on equilibrium models in mainstream economic analysis prevents economists from providing accurate representations of the complex and dynamic nature of real economic systems. In response, this paper argues the following. Many economic systems are the products of deliberate and centralized human design. People can and do build and support structures, such as social institutions, aiming to enhance the predictability of economic systems, and thus to move them toward being equilibrium systems. This (...)
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  18. Bankers as Immoral? Some Parallels and Differences between Aquinas's Views on Usury and Marxian Views of Banking and Credit.Thomas E. Lambert - 2024 - Economic Thought 11 (2):31.
    Since ancient times the practices and ethics of bankers and banking in general have undergone a great deal of criticism. While lending is motivated by profit, and while households are not explicitly coerced into borrowing money, the justice of a system which exploits workers and at the same time encourages them to borrow money in order to maintain a certain standard of living can be viewed as sometimes unfair and perhaps immoral. The value of goods, according to St. Thomas Aquinas (...)
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  19. On CBDC and the Need for Public Debate: Policy and the Concept of Process.Jamie Morgan - 2024 - Economic Thought 11 (2):3.
    According to the Principle of Techno-Geek Proportionality, for every million times a nerd gets excited about “the latest thing” the world might change once. Central bank digital currency (CBDC) may be that once. There is nothing new about digital money, but there may be many profoundly new things about CBDC. This is especially so for “retail” CBDC – that is, CBDC freely available to the public rather than “wholesale” CBDC, which is restricted to some registered users and central bank systems. (...)
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  20. Re-Thinking Fast and Slow.John R. Stinespring - 2024 - Economic Thought 11 (2):45.
    Daniel Kahneman's book Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011) has had a worldwide impact. The book's insights are profound and have changed the thinking of both decision scientists and general audiences about how choices are made. Kahneman, however, claims that standard utility theory cannot explain these insights because it 1) lacks “reference points” from which gains and losses can be measured, 2) does not predict loss aversion, and 3) assumes preferences are stable (amid supposed counter evidence). These alleged failures of utility (...)
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  21. On Technofeudalism: What Killed Capitalism? An interview with Yanis Varoufakis by Michel Zouboulakis.Michel Zouboulakis - 2024 - Economic Thought 11 (2):25.
    Yanis Varoufakis is an economist and politician. After serving as Greek Finance Minister in 2015, he went on to co-found the Democracy in Europe Movement 2025, of which he is now Secretary- General. The author of many books and academic papers, his latest work, Technofeudalism: What Killed Capitalism?, was published by Bodley Head in 2023. Professor of Economics, and editor of this journal, Michel Zouboulakis interviewed Varoufakis in December 2023. What follows is a transcript of that meeti...
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  22. How to be absolutely fair Part I: The Fairness formula.Stefan Wintein & Conrad Heilmann - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
    We present the first comprehensive theory of fairness that conceives of fairness as having two dimensions: a comparative and an absolute one. The comparative dimension of fairness has traditionally been the main interest of Broomean fairness theories. It has been analysed as satisfying competing individual claims in proportion to their respective strengths. And yet, many key contributors to Broomean fairness agree that ‘absolute’ fairness is important as well. We make this concern precise by introducing the Fairness formula and the absolute (...)
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  23. How to be absolutely fair Part II: Philosophy meets economics.Stefan Wintein & Conrad Heilmann - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
    In the article ‘How to be absolutely fair, Part I: the Fairness formula’, we presented the first theory of comparative and absolute fairness. Here, we relate the implications of our Fairness formula to economic theories of fair division. Our analysis makes contributions to both philosophy and economics: to the philosophical literature, we add an axiomatic discussion of proportionality and fairness. To the economic literature, we add an appealing normative theory of absolute and comparative fairness that can be used to evaluate (...)
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  24. Li zhi de kun huo: dang dai she hui ke xue de zhe xue kun jing ji qi ren shi lun yan jiu.Yuanhua Tao - 1989 - Beijing: Jing xiao Xin hua shu dian.
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  25. To change or not to change. The evolution of forecasting models at the Bank of England.Aurélien Goutsmedt, Francesco Sergi, Béatrice Cherrier, Juan Acosta, Clément Fontan & François Claveau - forthcoming - Journal of Economic Methodology:1-21.
    Why do policymakers and economists within a policymaking institution choose to throw away a model and to develop an alternative one? Why do they choose to stick to an existing model? This article contributes to the literature on the history and philosophy of modelling by answering these questions. It delves into the dynamics of persistence, change, and building practices of macroeconomic modelling, using the case of forecasting models at the Bank of England (1974–2014). Based on archives and interviews, we document (...)
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  26. Social Science, Policy and Democracy.Johanna Thoma - 2023 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 52 (1):5-41.
  27. The Ambiguity Dilemma for Imprecise Bayesians.Mantas Radzvilas, William Peden & Francesco De Pretis - forthcoming - The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    How should we make decisions when we do not know the relevant physical probabilities? In these ambiguous situations, we cannot use our knowledge to determine expected utilities or payoffs. The traditional Bayesian answer is that we should create a probability distribution using some mix of subjective intuition and objective constraints. Imprecise Bayesians argue that this approach is inadequate for modelling ambiguity. Instead, they represent doxastic states using credal sets. Generally, insofar as we are more uncertain about the physical probability of (...)
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  28. Simi dao Makesi: jing ji zhe xue fang fa de li shi xing quan shi.Zhengdong Tang - 2002 - Nanjing Shi: Nanjing da xue chu ban she.
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  29. Digital value.Andrew M. Bailey - forthcoming - Philosophy and Digitality.
    Digital artifacts — humanly-constructed items that inhabit our computers and networks — suffer an unfortunate reputation as being virtual and therefore unreal, and all too easy to reproduce on the cheap. These features together prompt the question of this article: if digital artifacts can be reproduced for free, and if they are unreal, why do they have economic value at all? Using a focal case study of bitcoin — the most unreal digital artifact of them all, and one that has (...)
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  30. مجلة كراسات تربوية. العدد 05.مارس 2020.الصديق الصادقي العماري وآخرون & Seddik Sadiki Amari - 2020 - maroc المغرب ،salé سلا: CHAM'S PRINT مطبعة شمس برنت. Edited by الصديق الصادقي العماري وآخرون.
    تقديم منذ القدم اعتنت الحضارات بالتربية، وأنشأت لذلك مؤسسات تفي بغرض تعليم المهارات والكفايات، وإعادة إنتاج المجتمع. وقد كان ذلك تحت ضغط حاجة الاجتماع، وإقامة المدن والدول، وتجويد الصناعات والمهن. لقد كانت المجتمعات البسيطة، المبنية على العيش وفق ما تهبه الطبيعة مباشرة، بغير حاجة إلى مؤسسات تعلم كيفية اصطياد حيوان أو جني فاكهة أو حفر جذور نبات، حيث كان القدماء والراشدون يمررون المهارات بالقدوة والتقليد، والصغار يتعلمون بالمحاولة والخطأ. وما أن بنيت القرى الأولى وبدأ الإنسان يدجن النبات والحيوان، حتى بدأ (...)
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  31. مجلة كراسات تربوية. العدد 02. فبراير 2016.الصديق الصادقي العماري وآخرون & Seddik Sadiki Amari - 2016 - maroc المغرب .Casablanca الدار البيضاء: Afrique Orient أفريقيا الشرق. Edited by الصديق الصادقي العماري وآخرون.
    لا يمكن الحديث عن مدرسة النجاح في المستقبل٬ ما لم يتم استحضار التطور الحاصل في أدوار ووظائف وآليات اشتغال المدرسة٬ من خلال التعرف على سيرورات التحولات التي عرفتها وظائف وأدوار هذه المؤسسة في الماضي والحاضر. ففي الوقت الراهن تحولت هذه الوظائف من التلقين والحشو بالمعارف٬ إلى وظائف أكثر حيوية وتنوعا ودينامية٬ تتجه صوب إيجاد حلول لتحديات اكساب التلميذ مناهج وتقنيات تحصيل المعرفة والبحث٬ وتعزيز قدراته ومهاراته الحياتية٬ وتوسيع خبراته٬ إضافة إلى سعيها لتطوير جاهزيته للشغل وتحقيق الذات والعيش المشترك مع الأفراد (...)
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  32. Property, Justice and Global Society.Volker Heins - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
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  33. An Articulation of Extra-Territorial Recognition: Toward International and Supranational Solutions of Global Poverty.Marek Hrubec - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
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  34. Recognition and Redistribution in Theories of Justice Beyond the State.Shane O'Neill & Caroline Walsh - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
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  35. Solidarity, Justice and the Postnational Constellation: Habermas and Beyond.Lawrence Wilde - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
  36. Recognition Beyond the State.Simon Thompson - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
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  37. The Recognition of Globalization and the Globalization of Recognition.Gary Browning - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
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  38. Honneth, Hegel and Global Justice.Andrew Buchwalter - 2013 - In Burns Tony & Thompson Simon (eds.), Global Justice and the Politics of Recognition. Palgrave.
  39. Inclusive economic theory.Steven Rosefielde - 2014 - London: World Scientific.
    The goal of “Inclusive Economics” is to tie together various authoritative strands of contemporary economic theory into an easily comprehensible whole that illuminates the need for a broader approach to contemporary economic policymaking undistorted by obsolete 18th century rationalist assumptions about utility, ethics, worthiness and traditional culture. This is accomplished by elaborating the rationalist competitive ideal along the optimizing lines pioneered by Paul Samuelson (neoclassical economics); plumbing modifications necessitated by Herbert Simon's realist concepts of “bounded rationality” and “satisficing”; refined further (...)
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  40. Sociology and the sacred: an introduction to Philip Rieff's theory of culture.Antonius A. W. Zondervan - 2005 - Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
    The acclaimed American sociologist and cultural philosopher Philip Rieff gained great academic prestige with his thesis on the emergence of 'Psychological Man' in western culture and with his classic book, Freud: The Mind of the Moralist, published in 1959. In this work and the later The Triumph of the Therapeutic (1966) he not only offered a highly original interpretation of the work of Sigmund Freud, but critically evaluated the enormous influence of psychotherapeutic thinking on Western culture. However, Rieff's later work (...)
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  41. Crooked thinking or straight talk? Modernizing Epicurean scientific philosophy. [REVIEW]Francesco Guala - 2022 - Journal of Economic Methodology 31 (1):54-58.
    Once upon a time, a long time ago, social philosophy was supposed to be grounded on scientific knowledge. Radical thinkers like Jeremy Bentham and Karl Marx ridiculed the idea that values should gu...
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  42. Economic theories and their Dueling interpretations.Itzhak Gilboa, Andrew Postlewaite, Larry Samuelson & David Schmeidler - 2022 - Journal of Economic Methodology:1-20.
    The interpretation of economic theories varies along several dimensions. First, models can describe reality, illustrate a recommended state of affairs, or analyze the structure and implications of a theory. Second, theories can be used for prediction or for explanation. Third, theories can relate to reality in a rule-based or case-based manner. Fourth, theories can be statements about economic reality or about the act of economic reasoning itself. Fifth, theories can offer predictions or merely critique reasoning. We argue that theories are (...)
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  43. 21-Seiki No Daen GensōRon: Sono Hi-Gurashi No Tetsugaku.Katsumi Hirakawa - 2018 - Tōkyō: Mishimasha.
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  44. Marx and the basic concepts of sociological theory : from a seminar transcript in the summer semester of 1962.Theodor W. Adorno - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  45. Introduction to Theodor W. Adorno on Marx and the basic concepts of sociological theory. From a seminar transcript in the summer semester of 1962.Chris O'Kane - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  46. Non-identity, critique of labour and pseudo-praxis : extra-marginal palinlegomena on the dialectics of doing.Marcel Stoetzler - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  47. Conceptuality and social practice.Werner Bonefeld - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  48. Society maintains itself despite all catastrophes that may eventuate : critical theory, negative totality, and permanent catastrophe.Chris O'Kane - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  49. Society as real abstraction : Adorno's critique of economic nature.Charles Prusik - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  50. The liquidation of the individual as a critique of political economy.Fabian Arzuaga - 2022 - In Werner Bonefeld & Chris O'Kane (eds.), Adorno and Marx: negative dialectics and the critique of political economy. Bloomsbury Academic.
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