Philosophy of Economics

Edited by Anna Alexandrova (Cambridge University)
Assistant editor: Jack Wright (Cambridge University)
About this topic
Summary Philosophy of economics is a study of any philosophical issue that arises in connection with the discipline of economics. Currently it has three core areas: foundations, methodology and ethics. Foundations of economics encompass conceptual and metaphysical questions such as the nature of rationality and social ontology, seeking to clarify what we study when we study economics (preferences, individuals, institutions, societies etc?) and their properties and relations to each other. Methodology of economics, following on the traditional questions in philosophy of science, is concerned with the nature of knowledge that can be attained about the economy and its sources.  The ethical side of philosophy of economics is a study of normative issues such as justice, efficiency, equality, welfare, paternalism, coercion and such, that arise at the intersection of political philosophy and welfare economics.
Key works Daniel Hausman is responsible for kickstarting much of contemporary philosophy of economics. Hausman 2008 is a comprehensive encyclopedia article. Hausman 2007 is an anthology of classic essays from to J.S Mill and Marx to the present day. Hausman et al 2006 is a seminal study of normative assumptions in economics and their critical study. Hausman 1992 started and still informs many discussions in methodology of economics. Reiss 2009 presents an updated agenda. Mäki 2001 is a collection on the ontology of economics.
Introductions There is now a textbook in philosophy of economics: Reiss 2013. Other good introductions to philosophy of economics are just introductions to philosophy of social science: for example, Rosenberg 1995, Risjord 2014, and Elster 2007.
Related categories
Subcategories:
See also:History/traditions: Philosophy of Economics

12022 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 12022
Material to categorize
  1. Team Reasoning Cannot Be Viewed as a Payoff Transformation.Andrew M. Colman - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
    In a recent article in this journal, Duijf claims to have proved that team reasoning can be viewed as a payoff transformation. His formalization mimics team reasoning but ignores its essential agency switch. The possibility of such a payoff transformation was never in doubt, does not imply that team reasoning can be viewed as a payoff transformation, and makes no sense in a game in which payoffs represent players’ utilities. A theorem is proved here that a simpler and more intuitive (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Welfare Diffusion Objection to Prioritarianism.Tomi Francis - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
    According to the Welfare Diffusion Objection, we should reject Prioritarianism because it implies the ‘desirability of welfare diffusion’: the claim that it can be better for there to be less total wellbeing spread thinly between a larger total number of people, rather than for there to be more total wellbeing, spread more generously between a smaller total number of people. I argue that while Prioritarianism does not directly imply the desirability of welfare diffusion, Prioritarians are nevertheless implicitly committed to certain (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Revisiting Variable-Value Population Principles.Walter Bossert, Susumu Cato & Kohei Kamaga - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
    We examine a general class of variable-value population principles. Our particular focus is on the extent to which such principles can avoid the repugnant and sadistic conclusions. We show that if a mild limit property is imposed, avoidance of the repugnant conclusion implies the sadistic conclusion. This result generalizes earlier observations by showing that they apply to a substantially larger class of principles. Our second theorem states that, under the limit property, the axiom of mere addition also conflicts with avoidance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Conscientious Objection in Firms.Sandrine Blanc - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):222-243.
    This article asks whether firms should exempt employees when they object to elements of their work that go against their conscience. Fairness requires that we follow the rules of an organization we have joined voluntarily only if these rules express mutual advantage. In corporations, I argue that subordination and exemption provides for mutual advantage better than subordination plus right of exit. This is because agents want to protect their conscientious convictions, even in hierarchical organizations geared towards efficient preference satisfaction. Thus (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. The Triumph of Injustice: How the Rich Dodge Taxes and How to Make Them Pay, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman. W.W. Norton, 2019, Xvi + 232 Pp., $27.95 (Hbk), ISBN: 9781324002727. [REVIEW]Gabriele Contessa - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (3):489-494.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Causal Effects and Counterfactual Conditionals: Contrasting Rubin, Lewis and Pearl.Keith A. Markus - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (3):441-461.
    Rubin and Pearl offered approaches to causal effect estimation and Lewis and Pearl offered theories of counterfactual conditionals. Arguments offered by Pearl and his collaborators support a weak form of equivalence such that notation from the rival theory can be re-purposed to express Pearl’s theory in a way that is equivalent to Pearl’s theory expressed in its native notation. Nonetheless, the many fundamental differences between the theories rule out any stronger form of equivalence. A renewed emphasis on comparative research can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Facing Up to Scarcity: The Logic and Limits of Nonconsequentialist Thought, Barbara H. Fried. Oxford University Press, 2020, Xvi+269 Pages. [REVIEW]Susanne Burri - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):321-327.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Contractualism and Risk Preferences.Tobey K. Scharding - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):260-283.
    I evaluate two contractualist approaches to the ethics of risk: mutual constraint and the probabilistic, ex ante approach. After explaining how these approaches address problems in earlier interpretations of contractualism, I object that they fail to respond to diverse risk preferences in populations. Some people could reasonably reject the risk thresholds associated with these approaches. A strategy for addressing this objection is considering individual risk preferences, similar to those Buchak discusses concerning expected-utility approaches to risk. I defend the risk-preferences-adjusted contractualist (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Taxation: Philosophical Perspectives, Martin O’Neill and Shepley Orr (Eds). Oxford University Press, 2018, 264 Pp., $55.00 (Hbk), ISBN 9780199609222. [REVIEW]Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):315-321.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Philippe Mongin.Daniel Hausman - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):331-333.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. How We Cooperate, John E. Roemer. Yale University Press, 2019, 248 Pages. [REVIEW]Natalie Gold - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):309-315.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Humanomics: Moral Sentiments and the Wealth of Nations for the Twenty-First Century, Vernon L. Smith and Bart J. Wilson. Cambridge University Press, 2019, Xx + 215 Pages. [REVIEW]Robert Sugden - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):304-309.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Measuring Norms Using Social Survey Data.Juliette R. de Wit & Chiara Lisciandra - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):188-221.
    This paper proposes a novel measure of civic norm compliance. We combine the literature on norm compliance from institutional economics and social philosophy. Institutional economics draws on survey data to measure civic norms, whereas social philosophy offers a theoretical framework that proves fruitful when used to operationalize civic norms. This paper shows that significantly different results emerge when the operationalization of civic norms in institutional economics draws on the theoretical framework that social philosophy offers. Furthermore, this study is relevant for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Strategic Justice – Convention and Problems of Balancing Diverging Interests, Peter Vanderschraaf. Oxford University Press, 2019, Viii + 391 Pages. [REVIEW]Lina Eriksson - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):455-460.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. The Origins of Unfairness: Social Categories and Cultural Evolution, Cailin O’Connor. Oxford University Press, 2019, 256 Pages. [REVIEW]Aja Watkins & Rory Smead - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (2):324-330.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Do Central Banks Serve the People? Peter Dietsch, Francois Claveau and Clement Fontan. Polity Press, 2018, Vii + 135 Pages. [REVIEW]Paul Tucker - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):481-487.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Frames, Reasoning, and the Emergence of Conventions.Nicola Campigotto - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):383-400.
    This paper examines the perceptual and reasoning processes that underpin regularities in behaviour. A distinction is made between situations as they are, or as described by an omniscient external observer, and situations as agents see or frame them. Different frames can stem from differences in culture, experience and personality, as well as from other context-specific factors. Drawing upon David Lewis’s Convention, I show that consistency between reasoning and experience does not preclude individuals from understanding the same state of affairs differently, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State, Paul Tucker. Princeton University Press, 2018, 656 Pages. [REVIEW]Jens van ‘T. Klooster - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):476-481.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. An Intersubjective Model of Agency for Game Theory.Vivienne Brown - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):355-382.
    This paper proposes a new interpretation of non-cooperative games that shows why the unilateralism of best-reply reasoning fails to capture the mutuality of strategic interdependence. Drawing on an intersubjective approach to theorizing individual agency in shared context, including a non-individualistic model of common belief without infinite regress, the paper develops a general model of a 2 × 2 simultaneous one-shot non-cooperative game and applies it to games including Hi-Lo, Stag Hunt, Prisoners’ Dilemma, Chicken, BoS and Matching Pennies. Results include High (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Time Biases: A Theory of Rational Planning and Personal Persistence, Meghan Sullivan. Oxford University Press, 2018.Conrad Heilmann - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (1):182-185.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Exit Versus Voice – Options for Socially Responsible Investment in Collective Pension Plans – CORRIGENDUM.Peter Dietsch - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (2):265-265.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Where Economics Went Wrong: Chicago’s Abandonment of Classical Liberalism, David Colander and Craig Freedman. Princeton University Press, 2019, Xii + 267 Pages. [REVIEW]Ross B. Emmett - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (2):312-318.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Asymmetry of Population Ethics: Experimental Social Choice and Dual-Process Moral Reasoning.Dean Spears - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (3):435-454.
    Population ethics is widely considered to be exceptionally important and exceptionally difficult. One key source of difficulty is the conflict between certain moral intuitions and analytical results identifying requirements for rational social choice over possible populations. One prominent such intuition is the Asymmetry, which jointly proposes that the fact that a possible child’s quality of life would be bad is a normative reason not to create the child, but the fact that a child’s quality of life would be good is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Rule by Multiple Majorities: A New Theory of Popular Control, Sean Ingham. Cambridge University Press, 2019, Pp. Ix + 190. [REVIEW]Thomas Christiano - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (1):186-191.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Newcomb’s Problem, Arif Ahmed (Editor). Cambridge University Press, 2018, 233 Pages. [REVIEW]J. Dmitri Gallow - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (1):171-176.
    Newcomb’s Problem, Arif Ahmed (editor). Cambridge University Press, 2018, 233 pages.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Climate Justice: Integrating Economics and Philosophy, Ravi Kanbur and Henry Shue (Editors). Oxford University Press, 2018, 288 Pages. [REVIEW]Simon Beard - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (1):176-182.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. In Our Best Interest: A Defense of Paternalism, Jason Hanna. Oxford University Press, 2018, Xiii + 271 Pages. [REVIEW]Joseph Heath - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (2):307-312.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The Epistemic Division of Labour in Markets: Knowledge, Global Trade and the Preconditions of Morally Responsible Agency.Lisa Herzog - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (2):266-286.
    Markets allow for the processing of decentralized information through the price mechanism. But in addition, many markets rely on other mechanisms in markets, or non-market institutions, that provide and manage other forms of knowledge. Within national economies, these institutions form an ‘epistemic infrastructure’ for markets. In global markets, in contrast, this epistemic infrastructure is very patchy, undermining the preconditions for morally responsible agency. New technologies might help to improve the epistemic infrastructure of global markets, but they require conceptualizing knowledge not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. A Philosophy for the Science of Well-Being, Anna Alexandrova. Oxford University Press, 2017, Xlv + 196 Pages. [REVIEW]Leah McClimans - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):347-354.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Individual and Social Deliberation: Introduction.Jan-Willem Romeijn & Olivier Roy - 2015 - Economics and Philosophy 31 (1):1-2.
    Deliberation is the process through which we decide what do to, or what to believe. When we think about what to do, we are engaged in practical deliberation. Theoretical deliberation is when we think about what to believe, or about which judgement to make.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Stable and Unstable Choices.Anders Herlitz - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (1):113-125.
    This paper introduces a condition for rational choice that states that accepting decision methods and normative theories that sometimes entail that the act of choosing a maximal alternative renders this alternative non-maximal is irrational. The paper illustrates how certain distributive theories that ascribe importance to what the status quo is violate this condition and argues that they thereby should be rejected.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. The Philosophy of Social Evolution, Jonathan Birch. Oxford University Press, 2018, Xi + 268 Pages. [REVIEW]Hannah Rubin - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):354-360.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Bayesian Ockham’s Razor and Nested Models.Bengt Autzen - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):321-338.
    :While Bayesian methods are widely used in economics and finance, the foundations of this approach remain controversial. In the contemporary statistical literature Bayesian Ockham’s razor refers to the observation that the Bayesian approach to scientific inference will automatically assign greater likelihood to a simpler hypothesis if the data are compatible with both a simpler and a more complex hypothesis. In this paper I will discuss a problem that results when Bayesian Ockham’s razor is applied to nested economic models. I will (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Decision Theory with a Human Face, Richard Bradley. Cambridge University Press, 2017, Xiv + 335 Pages. [REVIEW]Reuben Stern - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (1):186-193.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. The Corporation's Governmental Provenance and its Significance.Abraham A. Singer - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):283-306.
    :Corporations cannot exist, scholars rightly note, without being constituted by government. However, many take a further step, claiming that corporations are normatively distinct from other market actors because of this governmental provenance. They are mistaken. Like corporations, markets and contracts also require government for their creation. Governmental provenance does not distinguish corporations normatively because our coercive social institutions are pro tanto justified in re-arranging both corporate and non-corporate market activities on behalf of social and political values. The corporation is distinct (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Comments on the Report of the International Panel on Social Progress Chapter 13: Media and Communications.James Deane - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):471-476.
    Chapter 13 covers a broad waterfront, encompassing digital transformation, the unevenness in access to new technologies, the complex power dynamics that underpin the new media and communication space, the shifting role of journalism in enabling public knowledge, and the challenges and opportunities for social progress in media access, with particular attention focused on the role of citizen journalism and alternative media.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Comment on the Report of the International Panel on Social Progress, Chapter 3: Economic Inequality and Social Progress.Uma Rani - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):451-456.
    Chapter 3 discusses the causes, patterns and dynamics of inequalities in an exhaustive review of the literature on inequality of income, expenditure and wealth among individuals and households. It emphasizes how these inequalities reflect and affect inequality along various dimensions, including political freedom, economic opportunity, health, education and social outcomes. It gives three sets of policy recommendations for different populations: policies to improve the conditions among the poor, the vulnerable and the socially excluded; policies geared towards supporting the growth and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Response to Our Commentators on the Report of the International Panel on Social Progress 2018.Matthew Adler & Marc Fleurbaey - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):477-482.
    The contributors to this symposium have brought up many important points in their discussions of five chapters of the Report, and we are very grateful to them. Since the authors of the chapters would be better able to respond to many of the specific comments, we will confine ourselves here to a brief discussion of a few major issues highlighted by the contributors. We are in particular inspired by the following comments: Alina Rocha Menocal's point about the role of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. In Pursuit of Social Progress.Matthew Adler & Marc Fleurbaey - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):443-449.
    In 2014, the New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof wrote: ‘Some of the smartest thinkers on problems at home and around the world are university professors, but most of them just don't matter in today's great debates … I write this in sorrow, for I considered an academic career and deeply admire the wisdom found on university campuses. So, professors, don't cloister yourselves like medieval monks – we need you!’ At that time, a group of academics were working to launch (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Comments on the Report of the International Panel on Social Progress, Chapters 9 and 14: Inequality, Democracy and the Rule of Law[REVIEW]Alina Rocha Menocal - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):463-469.
    Over the past 30 years, the world has experienced a profound transformation, becoming both more open and more prosperous. Whereas in 1985 more than half of the countries worldwide were under authoritarian rule, most countries today are considered electoral democracies. Since 1990, more than a billion people have been lifted out of extreme poverty, while well-being indicators have improved dramatically on a global level, especially in terms of health and education.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. To Profit Maximize, or Not to Profit Maximize: For Firms, This is a Valid Question.Gregory Robson - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):307-320.
    :According to an influential argument in business ethics and economics, firms are normatively required to maximize their contributions to social welfare, and the way to do this is to maximize their profits. Against Michael Jensen's version of the argument, I argue that even if firms are required to maximize their social welfare contributions, they are not necessarily required to maximize their profits. I also consider and reply to Waheed Hussain's ‘personal sphere’ critique of Jensen. My distinct challenge to Jensen seems (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Comments on the Report of the International Panel on Social Progress, Chapter 7: The Future of Work, Good Jobs for All.Diana Alarcón - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):457-462.
    The authors of Chapter 7, The Future of Work, have made a thorough review of recent labour market trends. In telling a global story, the authors provide a vision of the future of work that should guide policy initiatives for the creation of desirable jobs for all. This vision is one where economic growth is consistent with ecological sustainability; with full and fair employment and no discrimination; where workers control their time and tasks; and where there are inclusive labour market (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Catering for Responsibility: Brute Luck, Option Luck, and the Neutrality Objection to Luck Egalitarianism.Greg Bognar - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):259-281.
    :The distinction between brute luck and option luck is fundamental for luck egalitarianism. Many luck egalitarians write as if it could be used to specify which outcomes people should be held responsible for. In this paper, I argue that the distinction can’t be used this way. In fact, luck egalitarians tend to rely instead on rough intuitive judgements about individual responsibility. This makes their view vulnerable to what’s known as the neutrality objection. I show that attempts to avoid this objection (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Nudge Versus Boost: A Distinction Without a Normative Difference.Andrew Sims & Thomas Michael Müller - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (2):195-222.
    :Behavioural public policy has come under fire by critics who claim that it is illiberal. Some authors recently suggest that there is a type of BPP – boosting – that is not as vulnerable to this normative critique. Our paper challenges this claim: there's no non-circular way to draw the distinction between nudge and boost that would make the normative difference required to infer the permissibility of a policy intervention from its type-membership. We consider two strategies: paradigmatic examples and causal (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Asset Inequality, Economic Vulnerability and Relational Exploitation.Gilbert L. Skillman - 2018 - Economics and Philosophy 34 (3):343-368.
    :In response to Roemer's reformulation of the Marxian concept of exploitation in terms of comparative wealth distributions, Vrousalis treats economic exploitation as an explicitly relational phenomenon in which one party takes advantage of the other's economic vulnerability in order to extract a net benefit. This paper offers a critical assessment of Vrousalis's account, prompting a revised formulation that is analysed in the context of a matching and bargaining model. This analysis yields precise representations of Vrousalis's conditions of economic vulnerability and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Comparative Value and the Weight of Reasons.Itai Sher - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (1):103-158.
    :One view of practical reasoning is that it involves the weighing of reasons. It is not clear, however, how the weights of reasons combine, especially given the logical and substantive relations among different reasons. Nor is it clear how the weighing of reasons relates to decision theoretic maximization of expected value. This paper constructs a formal model of reasons and their weight in order to shed light on these issues. The model informs philosophical debates about reasons, such as the question (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. The Impossibility of Liberal Rights in a Diverse World.Hun Chung - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (1):1-27.
    A defining characteristic of a liberal democratic society is the assignment of basic rights and liberties that protect each person’s private sphere. Hence, social choice made in a liberal democratic society must at the very least be consistent with the exercise of each person’s basic rights. However, even when everybody agrees to this basic principle, there could still remain irreconcilable social conflict and disagreement when it comes to the specific assignment of basic rights. This is especially so in a pluralistic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Reasons Without Persons. Rationality, Identity, and Time, Brian Hedden. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Viii + 224 Pages. [REVIEW]Christophe Salvat - 2016 - Economics and Philosophy 32 (3):548-553.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. An Introduction to the Symposium on Rational Choice and Philosophy.Samir Okasha & John A. Weymark - 2016 - Economics and Philosophy 32 (2):171-173.
    This symposium contains a selection of the papers that were presented at a conference we organized on Rational Choice and Philosophy that was held at Vanderbilt University on 16 and 17 May 2014. The aim of the conference was to provide an inter-disciplinary forum for philosophical work that uses ideas and tools from rational choice theory, understood broadly to include decision theory, game theory and social choice theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Analogies and Theories: Formal Models of Reasoning, Itzhak Gilboa, Larry Samuelson and David Schmeidler. Oxford University Press, 2015.Hykel Hosni - 2016 - Economics and Philosophy 32 (2):373-381.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 12022