40 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Eran Klein [38]Eran P. Klein [2]Eran Patrick Klein [1]
  1.  57
    Staying in the Loop: Relational Agency and Identity in Next-Generation DBS for Psychiatry.Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Darin D. Dougherty & Alik S. Widge - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):59-70.
    In this article, we explore how deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices designed to “close the loop”—to automatically adjust stimulation levels based on computational algorithms—may risk taking the individual agent “out of the loop” of control in areas where (at least apparent) conscious control is a hallmark of our agency. This is of particular concern in the area of psychiatric disorders, where closed-loop DBS is attracting increasing attention as a therapy. Using a relational model of identity and agency, we consider whether (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  2.  51
    Recommendations for Responsible Development and Application of Neurotechnologies.Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Laura Specker Sullivan, Anna Wexler, Blaise Agüera Y. Arcas, Guoqiang Bi, Jose M. Carmena, Joseph J. Fins, Phoebe Friesen, Jack Gallant, Jane E. Huggins, Philipp Kellmeyer, Adam Marblestone, Christine Mitchell, Erik Parens, Michelle Pham, Alan Rubel, Norihiro Sadato, Mina Teicher, David Wasserman, Meredith Whittaker, Jonathan Wolpaw & Rafael Yuste - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (3):365-386.
    Advancements in novel neurotechnologies, such as brain computer interfaces and neuromodulatory devices such as deep brain stimulators, will have profound implications for society and human rights. While these technologies are improving the diagnosis and treatment of mental and neurological diseases, they can also alter individual agency and estrange those using neurotechnologies from their sense of self, challenging basic notions of what it means to be human. As an international coalition of interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners, we examine these challenges and make (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  3.  44
    Mapping the Dimensions of Agency.Andreas Schönau, Ishan Dasgupta, Timothy Brown, Erika Versalovic, Eran Klein & Sara Goering - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2):172-186.
    Neural devices have the capacity to enable users to regain abilities lost due to disease or injury – for instance, a deep brain stimulator (DBS) that allows a person with Parkinson’s disease to regain the ability to fluently perform movements or a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) that enables a person with spinal cord injury to control a robotic arm. While users recognize and appreciate the technologies’ capacity to maintain or restore their capabilities, the neuroethics literature is replete with examples of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  4. The Role of Family Members in Psychiatric Deep Brain Stimulation Trials: More Than Psychosocial Support.Marion Boulicault, Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Darin Dougherty & Alik S. Widge - 2023 - Neuroethics 16 (2):1-18.
    Family members can provide crucial support to individuals participating in clinical trials. In research on the “newest frontier” of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)—the use of DBS for psychiatric conditions—family member support is frequently listed as a criterion for trial enrollment. Despite the significance of family members, qualitative ethics research on DBS for psychiatric conditions has focused almost exclusively on the perspectives and experiences of DBS recipients. This qualitative study is one of the first to include both DBS recipients and their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Views of stakeholders at risk for dementia about deep brain stimulation for cognition.Eran Klein, Natalia Montes Daza, Ishan Dasgupta, Kate MacDuffie, Andreas Schönau, Garrett Flynn, Dong Song & Sara Goering - 2023 - Brain Stimulation 16 (3):742-747.
  6.  28
    Ethical Issues in Intraoperative Neuroscience Research: Assessing Subjects’ Recall of Informed Consent and Motivations for Participation.Anna Wexler, Rebekah J. Choi, Ashwin G. Ramayya, Nikhil Sharma, Brendan J. McShane, Love Y. Buch, Melanie P. Donley-Fletcher, Joshua I. Gold, Gordon H. Baltuch, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (1):57-66.
    BackgroundAn increasing number of studies utilize intracranial electrophysiology in human subjects to advance basic neuroscience knowledge. However, the use of neurosurgical patients as human research subjects raises important ethical considerations, particularly regarding informed consent and undue influence, as well as subjects’ motivations for participation. Yet a thorough empirical examination of these issues in a participant population has been lacking. The present study therefore aimed to empirically investigate ethical concerns regarding informed consent and voluntariness in Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing deep brain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7.  15
    Fostering Neuroethics Integration with Neuroscience in the BRAIN Initiative: Comments on the NIH Neuroethics Roadmap.Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (3):184-188.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  8.  23
    Brain Exceptionalism? Learning From the Past With an Eye Toward the Future.Eran Klein & Nicolae Morar - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):139-141.
    Discussions about brain data and privacy, particularly those advocating for human rights frameworks, at times, have embodied problematic undercurrents of, if not overt appeals to, neuro-exceptional...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  26
    What does it mean to call a medical device invasive?Eran Klein - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (3):325-334.
    Medical devices are often referred to as being invasive or non-invasive. Though invasiveness is relevant, and central, to how devices are understood and regarded in medicine and bioethics, a consensus concept or definition of invasiveness is lacking. To begin to address this problem, this essay explores four possible descriptive meanings of invasiveness: how devices are introduced to the body, where they are located in the body, whether they are foreign to the body, and how they change the body. An argument (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  70
    Engineering the Brain: Ethical Issues and the Introduction of Neural Devices.Eran Klein, Tim Brown, Matthew Sample, Anjali R. Truitt & Sara Goering - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (6):26-35.
    Neural engineering technologies such as implanted deep brain stimulators and brain-computer interfaces represent exciting and potentially transformative tools for improving human health and well-being. Yet their current use and future prospects raise a variety of ethical and philosophical concerns. Devices that alter brain function invite us to think deeply about a range of ethical concerns—identity, normality, authority, responsibility, privacy, and justice. If a device is stimulating my brain while I decide upon an action, am I still the author of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  11.  27
    Invasive Neurotechnology: A Study of the Concept of Invasiveness in Neuroethics.Benjamin Collins & Eran Klein - 2023 - Neuroethics 16 (1):1-12.
    Invasive neurotechnologies are a frequent subject of discussion in neuroethics. Technologies, like deep brain stimulation and implantable brain-computer interfaces, are thought to hold significant promise for human health and well-being, but they also raise important ethical questions about autonomy, safety, stigma, privacy, and agency, among others. The terms ‘invasive’ and ‘invasiveness’ are commonly applied to these and other neurotechnologies, yet the concept of invasiveness itself is rarely defined or delimited. Some have suggested that invasiveness may have multiple meanings – physical, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  7
    Brain Pioneers and Moral Entanglement: An Argument for Post‐trial Responsibilities in Neural‐Device Trials.Sara Goering, Andrew I. Brown & Eran Klein - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (1):24-33.
    We argue that in implanted neurotechnology research, participants and researchers experience what Henry Richardson has called “moral entanglement.” Participants partially entrust researchers with access to their brains and thus to information that would otherwise be private, leading to created intimacies and special obligations of beneficence for researchers and research funding agencies. One of these obligations, we argue, is about continued access to beneficial technology once a trial ends. We make the case for moral entanglement in this context through exploration of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  57
    Informed Consent in Implantable BCI Research: Identifying Risks and Exploring Meaning.Eran Klein - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1299-1317.
    Implantable brain–computer interface technology is an expanding area of engineering research now moving into clinical application. Ensuring meaningful informed consent in implantable BCI research is an ethical imperative. The emerging and rapidly evolving nature of implantable BCI research makes identification of risks, a critical component of informed consent, a challenge. In this paper, 6 core risk domains relevant to implantable BCI research are identified—short and long term safety, cognitive and communicative impairment, inappropriate expectations, involuntariness, affective impairment, and privacy and security. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14.  21
    Asking questions that matter – Question prompt lists as tools for improving the consent process for neurotechnology clinical trials.Andreas Schönau, Sara Goering, Erika Versalovic, Natalia Montes, Tim Brown, Ishan Dasgupta & Eran Klein - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    Implantable neurotechnology devices such as Brain Computer Interfaces and Deep Brain Stimulators are an increasing part of treating or exploring potential treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders. While only a few devices are approved, many promising prospects for future devices are under investigation. The decision to participate in a clinical trial can be challenging, given a variety of risks to be taken into consideration. During the consent process, prospective participants might lack the language to consider those risks, feel unprepared, or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  34
    To ELSI or Not to ELSI Neuroscience: Lessons for Neuroethics from the Human Genome Project.Eran Klein - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):3-8.
    The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) program of the Human Genome Project stands as a model for how to organize bioethical inquiry for a rapidly changing field. Neuroscience has experienced significant growth in recent years and there is increasing interest in organizing critical reflection on this field, as evidenced by the creation of “neuroethics.” A nascent framework for reflection on the implications of neuroscience is emerging but significant work remains, given the pace and scope of neuroscientific developments. The adoption (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  16.  11
    Can I Hold That Thought for You? Dementia and Shared Relational Agency.Eran Klein & Sara Goering - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (5):17-29.
    Agency is talked about by many as something that people living with dementia lose, once they've lost much else—autonomy, identity, and privacy, among other things. While the language of loss may capture some of what transpires in dementia, it can obscure how people living with dementia and their loved ones share agency through sharing capacities for memory, language, and decision‐making. We suggest that one consequence of adopting a framework of loss is that it makes the default response to changes in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  18
    Neurotechnology ethics and relational agency.Sara Goering, Timothy Brown & Eran Klein - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (4):e12734.
    Novel neurotechnologies, like deep brain stimulation and brain‐computer interface, offer great hope for treating, curing, and preventing disease, but raise important questions about effects these devices may have on human identity, authenticity, and autonomy. After briefly assessing recent narrative work in these areas, we show that agency is a phenomenon key to all three goods and highlight the ways in which neural devices can help to draw attention to the relational nature of our agency. Drawing on insights from disability theory, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  42
    Keeping Disability in Mind: A Case Study in Implantable Brain–Computer Interface Research.Laura Specker Sullivan, Eran Klein, Tim Brown, Matthew Sample, Michelle Pham, Paul Tubig, Raney Folland, Anjali Truitt & Sara Goering - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (2):479-504.
    Brain–Computer Interface research is an interdisciplinary area of study within Neural Engineering. Recent interest in end-user perspectives has led to an intersection with user-centered design. The goal of user-centered design is to reduce the translational gap between researchers and potential end users. However, while qualitative studies have been conducted with end users of BCI technology, little is known about individual BCI researchers’ experience with and attitudes towards UCD. Given the scientific, financial, and ethical imperatives of UCD, we sought to gain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  19.  28
    Data, Privacy, and Agency: Beyond Transparency to Empowerment.Erika Versalovic, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (7):63-65.
    Separation-based accounts of privacy define privacy as being left alone and unaccessed. Pyrrho et al. propose a more control-based account where privacy is about having the age...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  17
    Relational autonomy and the clinical relationship in dementia care.Eran Klein - 2022 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 43 (4):277-288.
    The clinical relationship has been underexplored in dementia care. This is in part due to the way that the clinical relationship has been articulated and understood in bioethics. Robert Veatch’s social contract model is representative of a standard view of the clinical relationship in bioethics. But dementia presents formidable challenges to the standard clinical relationship, including ambiguity about when the clinical relationship begins, how it weathers changes in narrative identity of patients with dementia, and how the intimate involvement of family (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  35
    “Who Will I Be?”: Relational Identity, Living with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and Future-Oriented Decisionmaking.Erika Versalovic & Eran Klein - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (4):617-629.
    Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) face many difficult, timing-sensitive decisions over the course of their illness, weighing present versus future harms and benefits. Supplemented by interviews with people with ALS, we argue for a relational approach to understanding these decisions and their effects on identity. We highlight two critical aspects of the patient–caregiver relationship: (1) the extent to which each may rely on the other leaves their wellbeing intimately intertwined and (2) patients often require others to help with the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  18
    Trading Vulnerabilities: Living with Parkinson’s Disease before and after Deep Brain Stimulation.Sara Goering, Anna Wexler & Eran Klein - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (4):623-630.
    Implanted medical devices—for example, cardiac defibrillators, deep brain stimulators, and insulin pumps—offer users the possibility of regaining some control over an increasingly unruly body, the opportunity to become part “cyborg” in service of addressing pressing health needs. We recognize the value and effectiveness of such devices, but call attention to what may be less clear to potential users—that their vulnerabilities may not entirely disappear but instead shift. We explore the kinds of shifting vulnerabilities experienced by people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  20
    Are Brain-Computer Interface Devices a Form of Internal Coercion?Eran Klein - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):32-34.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  24
    Neuroethics Inside and Out: A Comparative Survey of Neural Device Industry Representatives and the General Public on Ethical Issues and Principles in Neurotechnology.Katherine E. MacDuffie, Scott Ransom & Eran Klein - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience:1-11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  50
    Is There a Need for Clinical Neuroskepticism?Eran Klein - 2010 - Neuroethics 4 (3):251-259.
    Clinical neuroethics and neuroskepticism are recent entrants to the vocabulary of neuroethics. Clinical neuroethics has been used to distinguish problems of clinical relevance arising from developments in brain science from problems arising in neuroscience research proper. Neuroskepticism has been proposed as a counterweight to claims about the value and likely implications of developments in neuroscience. These two emergent streams of thought intersect within the practice of neurology. Neurologists face many traditional problems in bioethics, like end of life care in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  12
    Cognitive Enhancement as Transformative Experience: The Challenge of Wrapping One’s Mind Around Enhanced Cognition via Neurostimulation.Paul A. Tubig & Eran Klein - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-16.
    In this paper, the authors explore the question of whether cognitive enhancement via direct neurostimulation, such as through deep brain stimulation, could be reasonably characterized as a form of transformative experience. This question is inspired by a qualitative study being conducted with people at risk of developing dementia and in intimate relationships with people living with dementia (PLWD). They apply L.A. Paul’s work on transformative experience to the question of cognitive enhancement and explore potential limitations on the kind of claims (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  6
    What Happens After a Neural Implant Study? Neuroethics Expert Workshop on Post-Trial Obligations.Ishan Dasgupta, Eran Klein, Laura Y. Cabrera, Winston Chiong, Ashley Feinsinger, Joseph J. Fins, Tobias Haeusermann, Saskia Hendriks, Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, Cynthia Kubu, Helen Mayberg, Khara Ramos, Adina Roskies, Lauren Sankary, Ashley Walton, Alik S. Widge & Sara Goering - 2024 - Neuroethics 17 (2):1-14.
    What happens at the end of a clinical trial for an investigational neural implant? It may be surprising to learn how difficult it is to answer this question. While new trials are initiated with increasing regularity, relatively little consensus exists on how best to conduct them, and even less on how to ethically end them. The landscape of recent neural implant trials demonstrates wide variability of what happens to research participants after an neural implant trial ends. Some former research participants (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  85
    Privacy and ethics in brain-computer interface research.Eran Klein & Alan Rubel - 2018 - In Eran Klein & Alan Rubel (eds.), Brain–Computer Interfaces Handbook: Technological and Theoretical Advances. pp. 653-655.
    Neural engineers and clinicians are starting to translate advances in electrodes, neural computation, and signal processing into clinically useful devices to allow control of wheelchairs, spellers, prostheses, and other devices. In the process, large amounts of brain data are being generated from participants, including intracortical, subdural and extracranial sources. Brain data is a vital resource for BCI research but there are concerns about whether the collection and use of this data generates risk to privacy. Further, the nature of BCI research (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  20
    Ethical Considerations in Ending Exploratory Brain–Computer Interface Research Studies in Locked-in Syndrome.Eran Klein, Betts Peters & Matt Higger - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):660-674.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  11
    Asilomar Survey: Researcher Perspectives on Ethical Guidelines for BCI Research.Michelle Trang Pham, Sara Goering, Matthew Sample, Jane Huggins & Eran Klein - 2018 - Brain-Computer Interfaces 4 (5):97-111.
    Brain-computer Interface (BCI) research is rapidly expanding, and it engages domains of human experience that many find central to our current understanding of ourselves. Ethical principles or guidelines can provide researchers with tools to engage in ethical reflection and to address practical problems in research. Though researchers have called for clearer ethical principles or guidelines, there is little existing data on what form these should take. We developed a prospective set of ethical principles for BCI research with specific guidelines and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  10
    Why Taking Psychosocial Effects of Neurotechnology Seriously Matters.Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (3):307-309.
    The potential psychosocial effects of neurotechnology, particularly deep brain stimulation (DBS), have been at the center of a contentious debate within neuroethics. Many scholars have argued that...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  20
    Redefining the Clinical Relationship in the Era of Incentives.Eran Klein - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):26-27.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 26-27, February 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  2
    "In the spectrum of people who are healthy": Views of individuals at risk of dementia on using neurotechnology for cognitive enhancement.Asad Beck, Andreas Schönau, Kate MacDuffie, Ishan Dasgupta, Garrett Flynn, Dong Song, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2024 - Neuroethics 17 (2):1-18.
    Neurotechnological cognitive enhancement has become an area of intense scientific, policy, and ethical interest. However, while work has increasingly focused on ethical views of the general public, less studied are those with personal connections to cognitive impairment. Using a mixed-methods design, we surveyed attitudes regarding implantable neurotechnological cognitive enhancement in individuals who self-identified as having increased likelihood of developing dementia (n = 25; ‘Our Study’), compared to a nationally representative sample of Americans (n = 4726; ‘Pew Study’). Participants in Our (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  13
    Consent Through Rose-Tinted Glasses: The Optimistic Bias in Parkinson's Disease Clinical Trials.Lynn A. Jansen & Eran Klein - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):63-64.
  35. Brain–Computer Interfaces Handbook: Technological and Theoretical Advances.Eran Klein & Alan Rubel (eds.) - 2018
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  18
    Integrating Equity Work throughout Bioethics.Eran Klein, Erika Versalovic, Andreas Schönau, Natalia Montes, Darcy McCusker, Timothy Emmanuel Brown & Sara Goering - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (1):26-27.
    As members of a neuroethics research group funded by the NIH, we echo the call from Fabi and Goldberg for greater funding parity between the ethics of specialized medical technologies and br...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  25
    Skills, Dementia, and Bridging Divides in Neuroscience.Eran P. Klein - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):20-21.
  38.  16
    Citizen Neuroscience: Brain–Computer Interface Researcher Perspectives on Do-It-Yourself Brain Research.Stephanie Naufel & Eran Klein - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (5):2769-2790.
    Devices that record from and stimulate the brain are currently available for consumer use. The increasing sophistication and resolution of these devices provide consumers with the opportunity to engage in do-it-yourself brain research and contribute to neuroscience knowledge. The rise of do-it-yourself (DIY) neuroscience may provide an enriched fund of neural data for researchers, but also raises difficult questions about data quality, standards, and the boundaries of scientific practice. We administered an online survey to brain–computer interface (BCI) researchers to gather (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Neuroengineering and Ethics: Identifying Common Themes and Areas of Need Across Proposed Ethical Frameworks.Michelle Trang Pham, Matthew Sample, Ishan Dasgupta, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - forthcoming - In Nitish V. Thakor (ed.), Springer Handbook of Neuroengineering.
    Recent advancements in neuroengineering research have prompted neuroethicists to propose a variety of “ethical guidance” frameworks (e.g., principles, guidelines, framing questions, responsible research innovation frameworks, and ethical priorities) to inform this work. In this chapter, we offer a comparative analysis of five recently proposed ethical guidance frameworks (NIH neuroethics guiding principles, Nuffield Council on Bioethics, Global Neuroethics Summit Delegates, the Center for Neurotechnology’s neuroethical principles and guidelines, and the Neurotechnology Ethics Taskforce’s ethical priorities). We identify some common themes among these (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  42
    The Story of Bioethics: From Seminal Works to Contemporary Explorations. [REVIEW]Robert Baker, Jennifer K. Walter & Eran P. Klein - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (3):50.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations