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  1. Attitudes of deaf individuals towards genetic testing of genes known to cause hearing loss.Katherine L. Mascia & Nathaniel H. Robin - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    Congenital deafness is one of the most common birth defects reported. Approximately 70% of congenital deafness is non-syndromic, and approximately 80% of non-syndromic hearing loss results from a genetic cause. Middleton et al.’s1998 study highlighted the negative attitudes of culturally Deaf individuals towards genetic testing for genes known to cause hearing loss. While studies concerning genetic testing for deafness genes reference Middleton’s study, to our knowledge a re-evaluation of the attitudes of Deaf individuals towards genetic testing has not been conducted (...)
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  2. Does Gene Editing in the Wild Require Broad Public Deliberation?Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (S2).
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  3. Moral enhancement, the virtues, and transhumanism : moving beyond gene editing.Braden Molhoek - 2022 - In Arvin M. Gouw, Brian Patrick Green & Ted Peters (eds.), Religious Transhumanism and its Critics. Lexington Books.
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  4. A room with a view (and with a gene therapy drug) : gene therapy medicinal products and genetic tourism in Europe.Vera Lucia Raposo - 2023 - In Santa Slokenberga, Timo Minssen & Ana Nordberg (eds.), Governing, Protecting, and Regulating the Future of Genome Editing: The Significance of Elspi Perspectives. Brill/Nijhoff.
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  5. Transformation of medical care through gene therapy and human rights to life and health -balancing risks and benefits.Anne Kjersti Befring - 2023 - In Santa Slokenberga, Timo Minssen & Ana Nordberg (eds.), Governing, Protecting, and Regulating the Future of Genome Editing: The Significance of Elspi Perspectives. Brill/Nijhoff.
  6. Epilogue: Showing How he Means - Thinking Along with Gene Gendlin.Robert G. Fox - 2023 - In Eric R. Severson & Kevin C. Krycka (eds.), The Psychology and Philosophy of Eugene Gendlin: Making Sense of Contemporary Experience. Routledge.
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  7. Rewriting the genetic bond: Gene editing and our understanding of genetic parenthood.Shelly Simana & Vardit Ravitsky - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    One of the most prominent justifications for the use of germline gene editing (GGE) is that it would allow parents to have a “genetically related child” while preventing the transmission of genetic disorders. However, we argue that since future uses of GGE may involve large-scale genetic modifications, they may affect the genetic relatedness between parents and offspring in a meaningful way: Due to certain genetic modifications, children may inherit much less than 50% of their DNA from each parent. We show (...)
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  8. Games and genes: human diversity meets cytogenetics—Mexico 1968.Ana Barahona - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (4):1-24.
    The 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico included innovative practices and technological knowledge of human biology. The first time that cytogenetic techniques had been applied to athletes was in the 1966 European Athletics Championship in Budapest and used on Olympic athletes for the first time in Mexico in 1968. The Genetics and Human Biology Program was created for this purpose in 1966 in close collaboration with the Local Organizing Committee, by Mexican geneticists Alfonso León de Garay and Rodolfo Félix Estrada who (...)
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  9. How germline genes promote malignancy in cancer cells.Jan Willem Bruggeman, Jan Koster, Ans M. M. van Pelt, Dave Speijer & Geert Hamer - 2023 - Bioessays 45 (1):2200112.
    Cancers often express hundreds of genes otherwise specific to germ cells, the germline/cancer (GC) genes. Here, we present and discuss the hypothesis that activation of a “germline program” promotes cancer cell malignancy. We do so by proposing four hallmark processes of the germline: meiosis, epigenetic plasticity, migration, and metabolic plasticity. Together, these hallmarks enable replicative immortality of germ cells as well as cancer cells. Especially meiotic genes are frequently expressed in cancer, implying that genes unique to meiosis may play a (...)
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  10. Keeping the gene in its place.Johannes Jaeger & Nick Monk - 2013 - In Brian C. Goodwin, David Lambert, Chris Chetland & Craig Millar (eds.), The intuitive way of knowing: a tribute to Brian Goodwin. Floris Books.
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  11. The evolutionary fate and consequences of duplicate genes.M. Lynch & J. S. Conery - 2014 - In Francisco José Ayala & John C. Avise (eds.), Essential readings in evolutionary biology. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  12. Homeotic genes and the evolution of arthropods and chordates.S. B. Carroll - 2014 - In Francisco José Ayala & John C. Avise (eds.), Essential readings in evolutionary biology. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  13. Gene regulation for higher cells : a theory.R. J. Britten & E. H. Davidson - 2014 - In Francisco José Ayala & John C. Avise (eds.), Essential readings in evolutionary biology. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  14. Artificial transmutation of the gene.H. J. Muller - 2014 - In Francisco José Ayala & John C. Avise (eds.), Essential readings in evolutionary biology. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  15. Der Griff zum Gen. Die Crispr-Revolution : genetisch veränderte Tiere / Michael Lange ; Epigenetik : wie Umwelt und Verhalten Gene steuern / Hellmuth Nordwig ; Eingriff in die menschliche Keimbahn : kein Tabu mehr? / Antje Sieb ; Die Crispr-Revolution : genetisch veränderte Pflanzen / Katrin Zöfel ; Künstliches Leben : Organismen vom Reissbrett / Michael Lange ; Die Crispr-Revolution : wie sich ethische Debatten verändern.Regina Oehler - 2018 - In Biologie und Ethik: Natur im Griff?: die Sendungen des Funkkollegs. Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung.
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  16. In genes we trust : on the consequences of genetic essentialism.Anita Schmalor & Steven J. Heine - 2018 - In Bastiaan T. Rutjens & Mark J. Brandt (eds.), Belief systems and the perception of reality. Taylor & Francis.
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  17. Above the gene, beyond biology: toward a philosophy of epigenetics.Jan Baedke - 2018 - Pittsburgh, Pa.: University of Pittsburgh Press.
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  18. Governing gene editing in the European Union : legal and ethical considerations.Mihalis Kritikos - 2019 - In Zvonimir Koporc (ed.), Ethics and integrity in health and life sciences research. Emerald Publishing.
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  19. Global genes, local concerns: legal, ethical, and scientific challenges in international biobanking.Timo Minssen, Janne Rothmar Herrmann & Jens Schovsbo (eds.) - 2019 - Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing.
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  20. Cultural translation, human meaning, and genes : why interpretation matters in psychiatric genomics.Camillia Kong - 2019 - In Yaw A. Frimpong-Mansoh & Caesar A. Atuire (eds.), Bioethics in Africa: theories and praxis. Vernon Press.
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  21. Governing nontraditional gene editing.Maxwell J. Mehlman & Ronald A. Conlon - 2021 - In I. Glenn Cohen, Nita A. Farahany, Henry T. Greely & Carmel Shachar (eds.), Consumer genetic technologies: ethical and legal considerations. Cambridge University Press.
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  22. Programming our genomes, programming ourselves : the moral and regulatory challenge of regulating do-it-yourself gene editing.Barbara J. Evans - 2021 - In I. Glenn Cohen, Nita A. Farahany, Henry T. Greely & Carmel Shachar (eds.), Consumer genetic technologies: ethical and legal considerations. Cambridge University Press.
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  23. Human gene editing : traversing normative systems.Rosario IsasiRosario Isasi - 2021 - In G. T. Laurie (ed.), The Cambridge handbook of health research regulation. Cambridge University Press.
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  24. We Have Always Been Cyborgs: Digital Data, Gene Technologies, and an Ethics of Transhumanism.Stefan Lorenz Sorgner - 2021 - Policy Press.
    Transhumanism : in a nutshell -- On a silicon-based transhumanism -- On a carbon-based transhumanism -- A fictive ethics -- The end of the beginning.
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  25. Disability's challenge to theology: genes, eugenics, and the metaphysics of modern medicine.Devan Stahl - 2022 - Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.
    This book uses insights from disability studies to understand in a deeper way the ethical implications that genetic technologies pose for Christian thought. Theologians have been debating genetic engineering for decades, but what has been missing from many theological debates is a deep concern for persons with genetic disabilities. In this ambitious and stimulating book, Devan Stahl argues that engagement with metaphysics and a theology of nature is crucial for Christians to evaluate both genetic science and the moral use of (...)
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  26. Mechanisms of How Random Input Controls Bursting Gene Expression.Sijia Xiao, Yan Wang, Zhigang Wang & Haohua Wang - 2022 - Complexity 2022:1-17.
    The process of gene expression is affected by many extracellular stimulus signals, and the stochasticity of these signals reshapes gene expression. To adapt the fluctuation of the extracellular environment, genes have many strategies for augmenting their survival probability, frequency modulation, and amplitude modulation. However, it is unclear how genes utilize the stochasticity of signals to regulate gene expression and which strategy will be chosen to maximize cellular function. Here, we analyze a simple mechanistic model to clarify the effect of extracellular (...)
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  27. The Human Gene Editing Debate. [REVIEW]Trevor Stammers - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-3.
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  28. The gay gene(s)? Rethinking the concept of sexual orientation in the context of science.Iz González Vázquez - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (5):1-22.
    I argue that scientists should adopt a sexual orientation view that includes ‘internal’ sexual orientation markers such as desire, fantasies, and attraction, plus self-identification, and that these two markers should line up. By ‘internal’ markers, I mean inner states or processes of the agent. This can be contrasted with ‘external markers’, by which I mean, behaviours of the agent. I begin by critically reviewing four genetic studies of sexual orientation that are representative of the literature. I look at how each (...)
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  29. Walking a Fine Germline: Synthesizing Public Opinion and Legal Precedent to Develop Policy Recommendations for Heritable Gene-Editing.Shawna Benston - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (3):421-431.
    Gene-editing technologies, such as CRISPR/Cas9, are internationally ethically fraught. In the United States, policy surrounding gene-editing has yet to be implemented, while the science continues to speed ahead. However, it is not enough that policy be implemented: in order for policy to establish limits for the technology such that benefits are possible while threats are kept at bay, such policy must be ethical. In turn, the ethics of gene-editing is a culturally determined field of inquiry. This piece presents a proposal (...)
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  30. A Brief History of the Discovery of Gene Cloning in 1975.Jacalyn Duffin & Bernard Mach - 2022 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 65 (3):442-457.
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  31. Is Gene Editing Harmless? Two Arguments for Gene Editing.Julian Savulescu & Marcos Alonso - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (9):23-28.
    … the decision to genome edit will almost certainly be identity affecting, as a couple (or individual) will usually make it before they have created any embryos and the process itself will, at the...
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  32. How Gene–Culture Coevolution Can—but Probably Did Not—Track Mind-Independent Moral Truth.Nathan Cofnas - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    I argue that our general disposition to make moral judgments and our core moral intuitions are likely the product of social selection—a kind of gene–culture coevolution driven by the enforcement of collectively agreed-upon rules. Social selection could potentially track mind-independent moral truth by a process that I term realist social selection: our ancestors could have acquired moral knowledge via reason and enforced rules based on that knowledge, thereby creating selection pressures that drove the evolution of our moral psychology. Given anthropological (...)
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  33. Gene therapy and editing in the treatment of hereditary blood disorders: Medical and ethical aspects.Paula Cano Alburquerque, Lucía Gómez-Tatay & Justo Aznar - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (3):315-325.
    Gene therapy and gene editing are revolutionising the treatment of genetic diseases, most notably haematological disorders. This paper evaluates the use of both techniques in hereditary blood disorders. Many studies have been conducted in this field, especially with gene therapy, with very promising results in diseases such as haemophilia, certain haemoglobinopathies and Fanconi anaemia. The application of these techniques in clinical practice and the foreseeable development of these approaches in the coming years suggest that it might be useful to evaluate (...)
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  34. Loneliness in Relation to Depression: The Moderating Influence of a Polymorphism of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene on Self-efficacy and Coping Strategies.Marc Bedard, Robbie Woods, Carly Crump & Hymie Anisman - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  35. High-Priced Sickle Cell Gene Therapies Threaten to Exacerbate US Health Disparities and Establish New Pricing Precedents for Molecular Medicine.Frazer A. Tessema, Ameet Sarpatwari, Leah Z. Rand & Aaron S. Kesselheim - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (2):380-384.
    Gene therapies to treat sickle cell disease are in development and are expected to have high costs. The large eligible population size — by far, the largest for a gene therapy — poses daunting budget challenges and threatens to exacerbate health disparities for Black patients, who make up the vast majority of American sickle cell patients.
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  36. Genes, Categories and Species: the Evolutionary and Cognitive Causes of the Species Problem.J. R. Bridle - 2002 - Heredity 88 (6):488-488.
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  37. CRISPR Gene-Therapy: A Critical Review of Ethical Concerns and a Proposal for Public Decision-Making.Victor Lange & Klemens Kappel - unknown
    CRISPR is currently viewed as the central tool for future gene therapy. Yet, many prominent scientists and bioethicists have expressed ethical concerns around CRISPR gene therapy. This paper provides a critical review of concerns about CRISPR gene therapy as expressed in the mainstream academic literature, paired with replies also generally found in that literature. The expressed concerns can be categorised into three types depending on whether they stress risk/benefit ratio, autonomy and informed consent, or concerns related to various aspects of (...)
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  38. From Darwin to Derrida: Selfish Genes, Social Selves, and the Meanings of Life,: by David Haig, Cambridge, MA, MIT Press, 2020, 464 pp., $39.95T/£32.00.Stanley Shostak - 2021 - The European Legacy 27 (5):523-526.
    David Haig’s From Darwin to Derrida scrutinizes a wide range of historical and contemporary issues embedded in the theory and practice of genetics—from genes to multilevel selection, from prokaryot...
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  39. Social Situations Shape Social Emotions That Benefit Genes.Randolph M. Nesse - 2022 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 6 (1):39-42.
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  40. David Haig: From Darwin to Derrida: Selfish Genes, Social Selves, and the Meanings of Life.Bernard Wood - 2021 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 5 (1):85-86.
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  41. Cultural Evolution and Gene–Culture Coevolution.Peter J. Richerson - 2017 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 1 (1):89-92.
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  42. John H. Evans. The Human Gene Editing Debate. 216 pp., notes, bibl., index. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. £22.99 (cloth); ISBN 978-0197519561. E-book available. [REVIEW]Vivien Hamilton - 2022 - Isis 113 (2):466-467.
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  43. Modifying Our Genes: Theology, Science and ‘Playing God’.Trevor Stammers - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (2):191-193.
    Arising from a research project from the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion in Cambridge, UK, this primer on gene editing is written by a postdoctoral researcher in the Faculty of Divinity...
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  44. We Have Always Been Cyborgs. Digital Data, Gene Technologies, and an Ethics of Transhumanism.Aura Elena Schussler - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (1):7-11.
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  45. Governing Gene Drive Technologies: A Qualitative Interview Study.N. de Graeff, Karin R. Jongsma, Jeantine E. Lunshof & Annelien L. Bredenoord - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (2):107-124.
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  46. Gene Therapy - One Step Closer.Albert S. Moraczewski - 1983 - Ethics and Medics 8 (10):2-2.
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  47. Programmed by our Genes?Renée Mirkes - 1991 - Ethics and Medics 16 (6):1-3.
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  48. Genes and Ethics.M. A. Seibert - 1991 - Ethics and Medics 16 (5):2-4.
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  49. Who is the Scientist-Subject?: Affective History of the Gene.Esha Shah - 2018 - Routledge India.
    This book explores two disparate sets of debates in the history and philosophy of the life sciences: the history of subjectivity in shaping objective science and the history of dominance of reductionism in molecular biology. It questions the dominant conception of the scientist-subject as a neo-Kantian ideal self - that is, the scientist as a unified and wilful, self-determined, self-regulated, active and autonomous, rational subject wilfully driven by social and scientific ethos - in favour of a narrative that shows how (...)
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  50. Interreligious Perspectives on Mind, Genes and the Self: Emerging Technologies and Human Identity.Joseph Tham & Chris Durante - 2018 - Routledge.
    Attitudes towards science, medicine and the body are all profoundly shaped by people's worldviews. When discussing issues of bioethics, religion often plays a major role. In this volume, the role of genetic manipulation and neurotechnology in shaping human identity is examined from multiple religious perspectives. This can help us to understand how religion might affect the impact of the initiatives such as the UNESCO Declaration in Bioethics and Human Rights. The book features bioethics experts from six major religions: Buddhism, Confucianism, (...)
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