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  1. Book Review: Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women’s Human Rights, by Eileen Hunt Botting, Symposium on Botting’s Eileen Hunt Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women’s Human Rights . 306 Pp. [REVIEW]Ruth Abbey - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059171772531.
  2. Beyond Adaptive Preferences: Rethinking Women's Complicity in Their Own Subordination.Charlotte Knowles - forthcoming - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy.
    An important question confronting feminist philosophers is why women are sometimes complicit in their own subordination. The dominant view holds that complicity is best understood in terms of adaptive preferences. This view assumes that agents will naturally gravitate away from subordination and towards flourishing, as long as they do not have things imposed on them that disrupt this trajectory. However, there is reason to believe that ‘impositions’ do not explain all of the ways in which complicity can arise. This paper (...)
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  3. The Radical Limits of Decolonising Feminism.Suzanne C. Persard - 2021 - Feminist Review 128 (1):13-27.
    From yoga to the Anthropocene to feminist theory, recent calls to ‘decolonise’ have resulted in a resurgence of the term. This article problematises the language of the decolonial within feminist theory and pedagogy, problematising its rhetoric, particularly in the context of the US. The article considers the romanticised transnational solidarities produced by decolonial rhetoric within feminist theory, asking, among other questions: What are the assumptions underpinning the decolonial project in feminist theory? How might the language of ‘decolonising’ serve to actually (...)
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  4. From Gender Difference to Equal Humanity. A Reading of Edith Stein’s Anthropology in the Light of the Most Recent Feminist Orientations.Giulio Sacco - 2021 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 63 (1):107-122.
    Feminist thinkers have commonly interpreted Edith Stein’s “dual anthropology” as a form of essentialism and difference feminism. For them, men and women have (or should have) different functions and capabilities. The article argues against this traditional account. Starting from two distinct criticisms of difference feminism – that of Judith Butler and that of Martha Nussbaum – it claims that the best way to read Stein’s position is to consider it a liberal feminism, for the emphasis that she puts on the (...)
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  5. Sex Wars, SlutWalks, and Carceral Feminism.Lorna Bracewell - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (1):61-82.
    In recent years, scholars have identified a political formation that mobilizes the emancipatory energies of feminism in the service of the expansion of the carceral state. ‘Carceral feminism,’ as it has come to be known, is often portrayed by these scholars as a product of feminist-conservative convergence. Here, I argue that the rise of the SlutWalk movement suggests a more complex genealogy for carceral feminism. By situating SlutWalk in the historico-theoretical context of feminism’s sex wars, I reveal the carceral–feminist impulses (...)
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  6. Respect, Religion, and Feminism: Comments on Lori Watson and Christie Hartley, Equal Citizenship and Public Reason: A Feminist Political Liberalism.Clare Chambers - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (5):863-872.
    There is significant disagreement among feminists and liberals about the compatibility between the two doctrines. Political liberalism has come under particular criticism from feminists, who argue that its restricted form of equality is insufficient. In contrast, Lori Watson and Christie Hartley argue that political liberalism can and must be feminist. This article raises three areas of disagreement with Watson and Hartley’s incisive account of feminist political liberalism. First, it argues that an appeal to a comprehensive doctrine can be compatible with (...)
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  7. Feminism as Critique in a Neoliberal Age: Debating Nancy Fraser.Pauline Johnson - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (1):1-17.
    Neoliberalism, we are told, has “seduced” feminism. What is meant is that the libertarian and democratic hopes that have scoped this radical social movement have been reconfigured and re-energised by neoliberal project that models all our freedoms upon the market. Misgivings about “seductions” and “betrayals” require that feminist theory adopts the role of the arbiter on goals and meanings and this puts strains upon its deep commitment to democratic epistemologies. The following paper finds that the leading theorist of feminism as (...)
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  8. Liberal Neutrality and Gender Justice.Emily McGill-Rutherford - 2017 - Social Philosophy Today 33:91-111.
    At the center of many critiques of liberalism is liberal neutrality, which is attacked on two fronts. First, it is argued that neutrality yields a restrictive sphere of public reason. Contentious views—like those endorsed by citizens with marginalized comprehensive doctrines—are outlawed from public consideration. Second, state policies must have neutral effects, lest they differentially impact those with unpopular views. Contentious state actions—like those endorsed by citizens with marginalized moral views—are outlawed from implementation. It is this combination of demands for neutrality (...)
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  9. Vulnerability by Marriage: Okin's Radical Feminist Critique of Structural Gender Inequality.Michaele L. Ferguson - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):687-703.
    The central thesis of Susan Okin's Justice, Gender, and the Family—that the ideology of the traditional family is the linchpin of contemporary gender inequality in the US—remains significant more than a quarter-century after the book's publication. On a political register, Okin's insistence on structural analysis of gender inequality is an important corrective to recent mainstream feminist emphasis on individual women's choices. On an academic register, her work reveals the incoherence of scholarly classifications of feminist theories as “liberal feminist” or “radical (...)
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  10. The Sexual Division of Labor and the Split Paycheck.Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):651-667.
    This essay takes up an apparently minor idea of Susan Moller Okin's Justice, Gender, and the Family—that employers should split the paycheck of wage-earning husbands between employees and their stay-at-home spouses—and suggests that it actually threatens to undermine Okin's entire argument by perpetuating the most central cause of women's inequality by Okin's own account: the sexual division of labor. Recognizing the vital contributions that Okin's seminal work made and the impact that it had on the field of feminist philosophy and (...)
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  11. Russian Radical: Twenty Years LaterAyn Rand: The Russian Radicalby Chris Matthew Sciabarra University Park : Pennsylvania State University Press, Second Edition, 2013 Xv + 526 Pp., Notes, Bibliography, Index. [REVIEW]Wendy McElroy - 2015 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 15 (1):107-116.
  12. Emancipation as Moral Regulation: Latin American Feminisms and Neoliberalism.Verónica Schild - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (3):547-563.
    The article argues that feminist emancipation, understood as practices and discourses of self-development and of solidarity as empowerment, has become entangled with the neoliberal project. Indeed, emancipation as self-improvement has become synonymous with moral regulation projects that seek to adapt women to global capitalism. The article explores the relation between emancipation and neoliberal regulation from a situated approach by addressing the experience of Latin American feminisms, with a particular focus on Chile. This approach recognizes by implication that Latin American feminisms (...)
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  13. Political Liberalism, Ethos Justice, and Gender Equality.Blain Neufeld & Chad Van Schoelandt - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (1):75-104.
    Susan Okin criticizes John Rawls’s ‘political liberalism’ because it does not apply principles of justice directly to gender relations within households. We explain how one can be a ‘political liberal feminist’ by distinguishing between two kinds of justice: the first we call ‘legitimacy justice’, conceptions of which apply to the ‘legally coercive structure’ of society; the second we call ‘ethos justice’, conceptions of which apply to citizens’ ‘non-coercive’ relations. We agree with Okin that a society in which most persons act (...)
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  14. Liberal Feminism.Amy Baehr - 2013 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. pp. 150-166.
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  15. What Kind of Dialogue Do We Need? Gender, Deliberative Democracy and Comprehensive Values.Clare Chambers & Phil Parvin - 2013 - In Jude Browne (ed.), Dialogue, Politics and Gender. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This paper claims that a focus on gender as a source of controversy, and on feminism as a theoretical and practical approach, prompts a rethinking of the role of dialogue away from the liberal constitutionalist focus of deliberative democracy and towards a more fluid, reflexive approach.
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  16. Contra Fraser on Feminism and Neoliberalism.Nanette Funk - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):179-196.
    This article is a critical examination of Nancy Fraser's contrast of early second-wave feminism and contemporary global feminism in “Feminism, Capitalism and the Cunning of History,” (Fraser ). Fraser contrasts emancipatory early second-wave feminism, strongly critical of capitalism, with feminism in the age of neoliberalism as being in a “dangerous liaison” with neoliberalism. I argue that Fraser's historical account of 1970s mainstream second-wave feminism is inaccurate, that it was not generally anti-capitalist, critical of the welfare system, or challenging the priority (...)
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  17. Kantianism, Liberalism, and Feminism: Resisting Oppression.Carol Hay - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This is a book about the harms of oppression, and about addressing these harms using the resources of liberalism and Kantianism. Its central thesis is that people who are oppressed are bound by the duty of self-respect to resist their own oppression. In it, I defend certain core ideals of the liberal tradition—specifically, the fundamental importance of autonomy and rationality, the intrinsic and inalienable dignity of the individual, and the duty of self-respect—making the case that these ideals are pivotal in (...)
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  18. Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law.Elizabeth Brake - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    This book addresses fundamental questions about marriage in moral and political philosophy. It examines promise, commitment, care, and contract to argue that marriage is not morally transformative. It argues that marriage discriminates against other forms of caring relationships and that, legally, restrictions on entry should be minimized.
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  19. Gender Justice.Anca Gheaus - 2012 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 6 (1):1-25.
    I propose, defend and illustrate a principle of gender justice meant to capture the nature of a variety of injustices based on gender:A society is gender just only if the costs of a gender-neutral lifestyle are, all other things being equal, lower than, or at most equal to, the costs of gendered lifestyles.The principle is meant to account for the entire range of gender injustice: violence against women, economic and legal discrimination, domestic exploitation, the gendered division of labor and gendered (...)
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  20. A Feminist, Kantian Conception of the Right to Bodily Integrity: The Cases of Abortion and Homosexuality.Helga Varden - 2012 - In Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (eds.), Out of the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Pregnant women and persons engaging in homosexual practices compose two groups that have been and still are amongst those most severely subjected to coercive restrictions regarding their own bodies. From an historical point of view, it is a recent and rare phenomenon that a woman’s right to abortion and a person’s right to engage in homosexual interactions are recognized. Although most Western liberal states currently do recognize these rights, they are under continuous assault from various political and religious movements. Moreover, (...)
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  21. Liberal Feminism.Julinna C. Oxley - 2011 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 258--262.
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  22. Toward a Non-Ideal, Relational Methodology for Political Philosophy: Comments on Schwartzman's Challenging Liberalism.Elizabeth Anderson - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):130-145.
  23. Toward a Non-Ideal, Relational Methodology for Political Philosophy: Comments on Schwartzman's Challenging Liberalism.Elizabeth Anderson - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):130 - 145.
  24. Schwartzman Vs. Okin: Some Comments on Challenging Liberalism.Charles W. Mills - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):164-177.
  25. Bodily Integrity and Conceptions of Subjectivity.Mervi Patosalmi - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (2):125 - 141.
    This paper examines two different ways of understanding the concept of bodily integrity and their political implications. In Drucilla Cornell's use of the concept, the body cannot be separated from the mind. Protecting bodily integrity means protecting possibilities of imagining the self as whole. Martha Nussbaum's theorizing is based on a liberal way of conceptualizing subjectivity, in which the mind and the body are separate, and bodily integrity is used to refer to physical inviolability.
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  26. Okin's Liberal Feminism as a Radical Political Theory.Nancy Rosenblum - 2009 - In Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.), Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. Oup Usa.
  27. Toward a Humanist Justice : The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin.Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The late Susan Moller Okin was a leading political theorist whose scholarship tried to integrate political philosophy and issues of gender and the family. This volume stems from a conference on Okin, and contains articles by some of the top feminist and political philosophers working today. Their aim is not to celebrate Okin's work, but to constructively engage with it and further its goals.
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  28. Non-Ideal Theorizing, Social Groups, and Knowledge of Oppression: A Response.Lisa H. Schwartzman - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):177 - 188.
    In responding to Anderson, Tobin, and Mills, I focus on questions about non-ideal theory, normative individualism, and standpoint theory. In particular, I ask whether feminist theorizing can be "liberal" and yet not embody the problematic forms of abstraction and individualism described in "Challenging Liberalism". Ultimately, I call for methods of theorizing that illuminate and challenge oppressive social hierarchies.
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  29. From Liberal to Post-Colonial to Multicultural Feminism: Competing Approaches to the Study of Gender, Citizenship and Fate of Religious Arbitration.Ayelet Shachar - 2009 - In Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.), Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. Oup Usa.
  30. Globalizing Feminist Methodology: Building on Schwartzman's Challenging Liberalism.Theresa Tobin - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):145-164.
    A literary criticism is presented of the book "Challenging Liberalism: Feminism As Political Critique," by Lisa Schwartzman, in response to a symposium devoted to her book. The author comments on feminist theory's criticism of liberalism and the potential for feminist methodology to address the oppression of women globally. Topics include the argument for women's rights as human rights and criticism of the women's rights movement by African scholars, as well as a discussion of the Massai tribe.
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  31. The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices.Debra B. Bergoffen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
    This essay argues that the ambiguities of the just war tradition, sifted through a feminist critique, provides the best framework currently available for translating the ethical entitlement to human dignity into concrete feminist political practices. It offers a gendered critique of war that pursues the just war distinction between legitimate and illegitimate targets of wartime violence and provides a gendered analysis of the peace which the just war tradition obliges us to preserve and pursue.
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  32. Life as an Adjunct: Theorizing Autonomy From the Personal to the Political.Paula Droege - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (3):378-392.
    Self-conflict is a feature of most women’s lives, particularly as we struggle to balance the demands of work and family. Theories of autonomy that rest on a notion of a coherent self treat self-conflict as incompatible with autonomy; therefore, women who suffer self-conflict fail to act autonomously. Though autonomy and self-conflict can be accommodated by conceiving of autonomy as a matter of degree relative to a context of choice, this result sanctions a political system that forces the prioritization of one (...)
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  33. Does Feminism Discriminate Against Men?: A Debate.Warren Farrell & James P. Sterba - 2008 - Oup Usa.
    Does feminism give a much-needed voice to women in a patriarchal world? Or is the world not really patriarchal? Has feminism begun to level the playing field in a world in which women are more often paid less at work and abused at home? Or are women paid equally for the same work and not abused more at home? Does feminism support equality in education and in the military, or does it discriminate against men by ignoring such issues as male-only (...)
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  34. Resisting Definition: Gendering Through Interaction and Relational Selfhood.Alexis Shotwell & Trevor Sangrey - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):56 - 76.
    This paper argues that trans and genderqueer people affect the gender formation and identity of non-trans people. We explore three instances of this relationship between trans and non-trans genders: an allegiance to inadequate liberal-individualist models of selfhood; tropes through which trans people are made to stand as theoretical objects with which to think about gender broadly; and a narrow focus on gender and evasion of an intersectional understanding of gender formation.
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  35. Mary Wollstonecraft.Sylvana Tomaselli - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  36. The Second Feminism.Nancy Bauer - 2007 - Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy.
  37. Sex, Culture, and Justice: The Limits of Choice.Clare Chambers - 2007 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Autonomy is fundamental to liberalism. But autonomous individuals often choose to do things that harm themselves or undermine their equality. In particular, women often choose to participate in practices of sexual inequality—cosmetic surgery, gendered patterns of work and childcare, makeup, restrictive clothing, or the sexual subordination required by membership in certain religious groups. In this book, Clare Chambers argues that this predicament poses a fundamental challenge to many existing liberal and multicultural theories that dominate contemporary political philosophy. Chambers argues that (...)
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  38. Can Liberalism Account for Women’s “Adaptive Preferences”?Lisa H. Schwartzman - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:175-186.
    Feminist philosophers have questioned whether liberal theory can account for the phenomenon of adaptive preferences, specifically women’s preferences that are formed under conditions of sexist oppression. In this paper, I examine the argument of one feminist who addresses the problem of women’s “deformed desires” by relying on a liberal framework. Assessing her argument, I conclude that liberalism provides inadequate resources for responding to this issue since it errs in understanding adaptive preferences as exceptional, provides little explanation of how changes in (...)
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  39. Review of Lisa Schwartzman, Challenging Liberalism: Feminism As Political Critique[REVIEW]Rebecca Whisnant - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).
  40. Liberalism, Adaptive Preferences, and Gender Equality.Ann Levey - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):127-143.
    I argue that a gendered division of labor is often the result of choices by women that count as fully voluntary because they are an expression of preferences and commitments that reflect women's understanding of their own good. Since liberalism has a commitment to respecting fully voluntary choices, it has a commitment to respecting these gendered choices. I suggest that justified political action may require that we fail to respect some people's considered choices.
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  41. Feminism Without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity.Sunera Thobani - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):221-224.
  42. Varieties of Feminist Liberalism.Amy R. Baehr (ed.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The essays in this volume present versions of feminism that are explicitly liberal, or versions of liberalism that are explicitly feminist. By bringing together some of the most respected and well-known scholars in mainstream political philosophy today, Amy R. Baehr challenges the reader to reconsider the dominant view that liberalism and feminism are 'incompatible.'.
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  43. Why Privacy Isn't Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability.Anita L. Allen - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Accountability protects public health and safety, facilitates law enforcement, and enhances national security, but it is much more than a bureaucratic concern for corporations, public administrators, and the criminal justice system. In Why Privacy Isn't Everything, Anita L. Allen provides a highly original treatment of neglected issues affecting the intimacies of everyday life, and freshly examines how a preeminent liberal society accommodates the competing demands of vital privacy and vital accountability for personal matters. Thus, "None of your business!" is at (...)
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  44. The Ideal of Objectivity in Political Dialogue: Liberal and Feminist Approaches.Kevin M. Graham - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (3):295 – 309.
  45. Reasons, Explanation, and Saramago's Bell.Susan E. Babbitt - 2000 - Hypatia 20 (4):144-163.
    : In this essay, I suggest that significant insights of recent feminist philosophy lead, among other things, to the thought that it is not always better to choose than to be compelled to do what one might have done otherwise. However, few feminists, if any, would defend such a suggestion. I ask why it is difficult to consider certain ideas that, while challenging in theory, are, nonetheless, rather unproblematic in practice. I suggest that some questions are not pursued seriously enough (...)
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  46. Sex and Social Justice.Patrick D. Hopkins - 2000 - Hypatia 17 (2):171-173.
  47. Liberalism, Adaptive Preferences, and Gender Equality.Ann Levey - 2000 - Hypatia 20 (4):127-143.
    I argue that a gendered division of labor is often the result of choices by women that count as fully voluntary because they are an expression of preferences and commitments that reflect women's understanding of their own good. Since liberalism has a commitment to respecting fully voluntary choices, it has a commitment to respecting these gendered choices. I suggest that justified political action may require that we fail to respect some people's considered choices.
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  48. Mary Astell: Defender of the "Disembodied Mind".Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40 - 62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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  49. Universal Difference: Feminism and the Liberal Undecidability of "Women".Kate Nash - 1998 - St. Martin's Press.
    This book deals with the relationship between feminism and liberalism in theory and practice. The author argues that rather than seeing liberalism as exclusionary of women's specificity, as many contemporary feminists do, we should look at variations in liberalism, and in particular at its democratization in the nineteenth century and how feminists have used liberalism as a resource. Liberalism is analyzed using a post-structuralist theory of hegemony: texts of liberal political philosophy are deconstructed to show how the term "women" is (...)
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  50. Could a Feminist and a Game Theorist Co-Parent?Karen Wendling & Paul Viminitz - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):33 - 49.
    Game theorists assume that rational defensibility is a necessary condition for moral, social, or political justification. By itself, this is a fairly uncontroversial claim; most moral or political philosophers would agree. And yet game theorists tend to be advocates of the free market. External critics of game theory usually claim this is because game theorists assume that individuals are atomistic and self-interested. Game theorists themselves deny this, however, for what strike us as good reasons. In principle, game theory has no (...)
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