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  1. All Things Considered, Should Egalitarian Movements Accept Philanthropic Funding?Niamh McCrea - 2023 - Res Publica 30 (2):285-303.
    Philanthropy is a contentious and often polarising topic within egalitarian social movements. There are good reasons for this. Philanthropy is reliant on the inequalities inherent in the capitalist system, is fundamentally at odds with democratic relationships, and can moderate or control the activities of recipients. This article therefore starts from the premise that philanthropy violates egalitarian ideals in very significant ways. However, it goes on to suggest that, absent a ruptural change that would drastically weaken the bases of philanthropic wealth, (...)
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  2. Liberal egalitarianism and critical legal studies: articles of conciliation.Matthew McManus - forthcoming - Legal Ethics:1-18.
    Liberal egalitarian jurisprudence and critical legal studies have often been at odds, despite sharing a core of set of political and analytical commitments. This paper makes the case for their conciliation in the 21st century on the basis that both traditions have much to offer one another. Liberal egalitarians offer the theoretical tools for developing an egalitarian normative approach to law, and critical legal theorists offer a vital realism about power.
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  3. To be (disadvantaged) or not to be? An egalitarian guide for creating new people.Shlomi Segall - 2024 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 23 (2):154-180.
    Derek Parfit held that in evaluating the future, we should ignore the difference between necessary persons and merely possible persons. In this article, I look at one of the most prominent alternatives to Parfit's view, namely Michael Otsuka and Larry Temkin ‘shortfall complaints’ view. In that view, we aggregate future persons’ well-being and deduct intrapersonal shortfall complaints, giving extra weight to the complaints of necessary persons. I offer here a third view. I reject Parfit's no difference view in that I (...)
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  4. Indirect Discrimination and Inequality.Shu Ishida - 2023 - In Mitja Sardoč (ed.), Handbook of Equality of Opportunity. Springer.
    Indirect discrimination (or disparate impact) is one of the focal points of current antidiscrimination policies. However, few political/moral philosophers have paid substantial attention to indirect discrimination until recently. This contribution provides an overview of the two philosophical questions in this context: the definitional question (DQ) and the moral question (MQ). DQ concerns what distinguishes indirect discrimination from direct discrimination and inequality. Conceptually, either (1) indirect discrimination is not a genuine subtype of discrimination; (2) it is a subtype of discrimination secondary (...)
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  5. Et in America ego. Fichte's liberal and egalitarian critique of colonization, servitude, and slavery.Günter Zöller - 2023 - In María Jimena Solé & Elizabeth Millán Brusslan (eds.), Fichte in the Americas. Boston: BRILL.
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  6. Relational Egalitarianism and Intergenerational Justice: Reply to Sommers.Akira Inoue - 2024 - Res Publica (00):1-7.
    It is often argued that relational egalitarianism has a fundamental problem with intergenerational justice when compared to other theories of justice such as utilitarianism, prioritarianism, and luck egalitarianism. Recently, Timothy Sommers argued that there is no such comparative disadvantage for relational egalitarianism. His argument is quite modest: it merely aims to reject the claim that there could be no way to extend relational egalitarianism to intergenerational justice. This may be called the ‘No Comparative Disadvantage Thesis’. The present article challenges Sommers’s (...)
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  7. A human right to pleasure? Sexuality, autonomy and egalitarian strategies.Jon Wittrock - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (4):263-267.
    A growing focus on pleasure in human rights discourse has been used to address patterns of sexual exclusion, often when addressing the problems of people with disabilities (PWD). As convincingly argued by Liberman, however, not all PWD suffer from sexual exclusion, and not all who suffer from sexual exclusion are PWD. Danaher and Liberman have thus argued in various ways for a broader range of measures, addressing sexual exclusion. This article builds on previous research and offers a conceptual framework for (...)
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  8. L’ appel de Wheeler et Thompson : refonder l’utilitarisme par l’égalité entre les hommes et les femmes?Benjamin Bourcier - 2024 - Philosophie 161 (2):50-71.
    In “Wheeler and Thompson’s Appeal: refounding utilitarianism through equality between men and women?”, Benjamin Bourcier studies this Appeal in which, in response to James Mill’s article On Government, Anna Wheeler and William Thompson offer a radical critique of utilitarian thought, but also of Mill’s political exclusion of women and legitimization of patriarchy. In contrast to Mill, they defend the political inclusion and equality of women, in order to meet the aspirations of a society of equals and the greatest happiness for (...)
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  9. Bestaanszekerheid en gelijkheid.Josette Daemen - 2024 - Socialisme and Democratie 81 (1):82-88.
    In the political campaigns preceding the Dutch parliamentary elections of 2023, several parties embraced the idea of 'bestaanszekerheid', promising to restore or strengthen people's security of a basic living standard. This paper analyses this idea from the perspective of different egalitarian principles that we may find in social democratic thought. If we care about equality, should we also care about 'bestaanszekerheid'?
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  10. Intuition about Justice: Desertist or Luck Egalitarian?Huub Brouwer & Thomas Mulligan - forthcoming - The Journal of Ethics:1-24.
    There is a large and growing body of empirical work on people's intuitions about distributive justice. In this paper, we investigate how well luck egalitarianism and desertism--the two normative approaches that appear to cohere well with people's intuitions--are supported by more fine-grained findings in the empirical literature. The time is ripe for a study of this sort, as the positive literature on justice has blossomed over the last three decades. The results of our investigation are surprising. In three different contexts (...)
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  11. Why Be a Relational Egalitarian?Xuanpu Zhuang - 2024 - Philosophical Forum 55 (1):3-26.
    Relational egalitarians claim that a situation is just only if everyone it involves relates to one another as equals. It implies that relational egalitarians believe the ideal of “living as equals” (for short) is desirable, and furthermore, necessary for justice. In this paper, I distinguish three accounts of the desirability of the ideal: the instrumental value account, the non‐instrumental value account, and the non‐consequentialist account. I argue that the former two accounts cannot provide satisfying reasons for being a relational egalitarian. (...)
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  12. Refund: a defense of luck egalitarian policy in healthcare.Masahiro Yoshida & Akira Inoue - 2024 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 45 (1):25-40.
    Luck egalitarianism assigns a central role to personal responsibility in egalitarian justice. In the context of healthcare, luck egalitarianism is the view that the distribution of medical and healthcare resources—or common resources in general—should respond to the (im)prudence of individuals. Recently, Joar Björk, Gert Helgesson, and Niklas Juth have argued that it is impractical to use luck egalitarianism as a normative framework in healthcare because it has no reasonable way of dealing with the imprudent. In response to their argument, this (...)
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  13. Ubuntu Thinking on Biodiversity Loss: The Inadequacies of Egalitarian and Communitarian Solutions.Olusegun Steven Samuel & Rotimi Omosulu - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):145-169.
    This article evaluates the moral implications of two leading theories on biodiversity preservation/conservation (Paul Taylor's biocentric egalitarianism and J. Baird Callicott's holistic communitarianism). Taylor argues for the moral equality of all members of the Earth's community of life, calling for an ethic of respect for nature to conserve biodiversity. Callicott argues for the moral consideration of ecosystems to maintain their integrity, stability, and beauty. The article makes two major claims. First, we need a plausible account of moral egalitarianism to disrupt (...)
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  14. L’égalité des peuples en contexte fédéral?Xavier Boileau - 2023 - Dialogue 62 (3):513-537.
    Countries with federal institutions often face demands for more political autonomy from their member states. To answer these demands, some have proposed recognizing a right to internal self-determination, constrained in multiple ways. Although interesting, this proposition — defended by theorists of multinational federalism — might be insufficient in resolving the existing inequalities between peoples living in the same federation. This is the thesis for which I will argue in this paper. I will argue that Will Kymlicka's concept of internal self-determination (...)
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  15. Equality of When?Giorgos Galanis & Roberto Veneziani - 2017 - Oeconomia 7:25-59.
    This paper analyses the temporal unit of egalitarian concern. In the intertemporal context, the differences between egalitarian views can be appreciated not only in inequality analysis but also as regards the ideal egalitarian distribution to be established. In this paper, three intergenerational egalitarian principles (Complete Lives Egalitarianism, Corresponding Segments Egalitarianism and Simultaneous Segments Egalitarianism) are analysed and CSE is argued to be the appropriate egalitarian benchmark. The relations between the three principles and other moral ideals, namely maximin and utilitarianism, are (...)
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  16. Behavioural utilitarianism and distributive justice.Giorgos Galanis & Roberto Veneziani - 2022 - Economics Letters 215:110488.
    What are the distributive implications of utilitarianism? Is it compatible with a concern for equality, as many utilitarians have argued? We analyse these questions in the context of a pure allocation problem. We consider an infinitely-lived economy and, drawing on the behavioural literature, assume that individuals have reference-dependent preferences: agents’ utility is a function of current consumption and a reference point which captures consumption habits, or the agents’ upbringing. Assuming a history of inequalities in consumption, we show that the utilitarian (...)
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  17. Liberal Egalitarianism and the Harm Principle.Michele Lombardi, Kaname Miyagishima & Roberto Veneziani - 2016 - Economic Journal 126 (597):2173-2196.
    We analyse the implications of classical liberal and libertarian approaches for distributive justice in the context of social welfare orderings. We study an axiom capturing a liberal non-interfering view of society, the Weak Harm Principle, whose roots can be traced back to John Stuart Mill. We show that liberal views of individual autonomy and freedom can provide consistent foundations for welfare judgements. In particular, a liberal non-interfering approach can help to adjudicate some fundamental distributive issues relative to intergenerational justice. However, (...)
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  18. La profession d’architecte à l’épreuve de l’égalitarisme contemporain.Dominique Raynaud - 2008 - The Tocqueville Review 29:127-150.
    Why are architects faced with a long-standing crisis of legitimacy in democratic countries, even though going to an architect is required by law in most of these countries ? Design work and project management have now turned into a competitive partnership within an egalitarian trend. The crisis of the architectural profession results from the undermining of architects' powers relative to other actors. This fact clearly evokes a Tocquevillian paradigm : in democratic societies, the passion for equality tends to abolish all (...)
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  19. Can Relational Egalitarians Supply Both an Account of Justice and an Account of the Value of Democracy or Must They Choose Which?Andreas Bengtson & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Construed as a theory of justice, relational egalitarianism says that justice requires that people relate as equals. Construed as a theory of what makes democracy valuable, it says that democracy is a necessary, or constituent, part of the value of relating as equals. Typically, relational egalitarians want their theory to provide both an account of what justice requires and an account of what makes democracy valuable. We argue that relational egalitarians with this dual ambition face the justice-democracy dilemma: Understanding social (...)
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  20. Challenging inequality in a post-scarcity era : christian contributions to egalitarian trends.John Atherton - 2011 - In John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.), The practices of happiness: political economy, religion and wellbeing. Routledge.
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  21. Generalized poverty-gap orderings.Walter Bossert, Susumu Cato & Kohei Kamaga - 2022 - Social Indicators Research 164 (1):189–215.
    This paper provides a characterization of a new class of ordinal poverty measures that are defined by means of the aggregate generalized poverty gap. To be precise, we propose to use the sum of the differences between the transformed fixed poverty line and the transformed level of income of each person below the line as our measure. If the transformation is strictly concave, the resulting measure is strictly inequality averse with respect to the incomes of the poor. In analogy to (...)
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  22. Choice functions and weak Nash axioms.Susumu Cato - 2018 - Review of Economic Design 22:159–176.
    The Nash axiom is a basic property of consistency in choice. This paper proposes weaker versions of the axiom and examines their logical implications. In particular, we demonstrate that weak Nash axioms are useful to understand the relationship between the Nash axiom and the path independence axiom. We provide an application of weak Nash axioms to the no-envy approach. We present a possibility result and an impossibility result.
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  23. An Egalitarian Perspective on Information Sharing: The Example of Health Care Priorities.Jenny Lindberg, Linus Broström & Mats Johansson - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    In health care, the provision of pertinent information to patients is not just a moral imperative but also a legal obligation, often articulated through the lens of obtaining informed consent. Codes of medical ethics and many national laws mandate the disclosure of basic information about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment alternatives. However, within publicly funded health care systems, other kinds of information might also be important to patients, such as insights into the health care priorities that underlie treatment offers made. While (...)
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  24. Rationality and Operators: The Formal Structure of Preferences.Susumu Cato - 2016 - Springer.
    -/- This unique book develops an operational approach to preference and rationality as the author employs operators over binary relations to capture the concept of rationality. -/- A preference is a basis of individual behavior and social judgment and is mathematically regarded as a binary relation on the set of alternatives. Traditionally, an individual/social preference is assumed to satisfy completeness and transitivity. However, each of the two conditions is often considered to be too demanding; and then, weaker rationality conditions are (...)
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  25. Discrimination Based on Personal Responsibility: Luck Egalitarianism and Healthcare Priority Setting.Andreas Albertsen - 2024 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 33 (1):23-34.
    Luck egalitarianism is a responsibility-sensitive theory of distributive justice. Its application to health and healthcare is controversial. This article addresses a novel critique of luck egalitarianism, namely, that it wrongfully discriminates against those responsible for their health disadvantage when allocating scarce healthcare resources. The philosophical literature about discrimination offers two primary reasons for what makes discrimination wrong (when it is): harm and disrespect. These two approaches are employed to analyze whether luck egalitarian healthcare prioritization should be considered wrongful discrimination. Regarding (...)
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  26. On the Egalitarian Value of Electoral Democracy.Steven Klein - forthcoming - Political Theory.
    Within democratic theory, electoral competition is typically associated with minimalist and realist views of democracy. In contrast, this article argues for a reinterpretation of electoral competition as an important element of an egalitarian theory of democracy. Current relational egalitarian theories, in focusing on the equalization of individual power-over, present electoral institutions as in tension with equality. Against this view, the article contends that electoral competition can foster equality by incentivizing the equalization of cooperative power. The article develops the normative category (...)
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  27. The political right and equality: turning back the tide of egalitarian modernity.Matthew Mcmanus - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    McManus presents an intellectual history of the conservative and reactionary tradition, stretching from Aristotle and Confucius to Ayn Rand and Patrick Deneen. Providing a comprehensive critical genealogy of the intellectual political right, McManus traces its core to a nostalgia for the hierarchical cosmos of antiquarian and scholastic thinking. The yearning for a shared vision of the universe where each part of reality has its place maps onto the conservative admiration for orderly political and social stratification. It stamps even the more (...)
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  28. R. R. Palmer, 1789: Les révolutions de la liberté et de l'égalité. Traduit de l'américain par M. Paz, Paris, Calmann-Lévy, 1968, 14 × 21, 312 p. (Les Grandes vagues révolutionnaires). [REVIEW]Juliette Taton - 1973 - Revue de Synthèse 94 (70-72):340-347.
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  29. Corrado Rosso, Mythe de l’égalité et rayonnement des Lumières. Pise, Editrice Libreria Goliardica, 1980. 17 × 24, 328 p., 8 pl. h. t. [REVIEW]John Pappas - 1981 - Revue de Synthèse 102 (103-104):447-450.
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  30. Maria Teresa Bulciolu, L’École saint-simonienne et la femme. Notes et documents pour une histoire du rôle de la femme dans la société saintsimonienne. 1828-1833. Pise, Goliardica, 1980. 15,5 × 21, 260p. (« Études sur l’égalité »). [REVIEW]Pierre Huard - 1983 - Revue de Synthèse 104 (109):88-90.
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  31. Must Egalitarians Rely on the State to Attain Distributive Justice?Kaveh Pourvand - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):147-168.
    It is widely accepted among political philosophers that distributive justice should be promoted by the state. This essay challenges this presumption by making two key claims. First, the state is not the only possible mechanism for attaining distributive justice. We could rely alternatively on the voluntary efforts and interactions of individuals and associations in civil society. The question of what mechanism we should rely on is a comparative and empirical one. What matters is which mechanism better promotes distributive justice. We (...)
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  32. If You’Re an Egalitarian … so What?Nigel Pleasants - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):13-33.
    G. A. Cohen is justly acclaimed for his penetrating and searching critique of the commanding Rawlsian liberal paradigm in contemporary political philosophy. He is also well known for his fervent advocacy of a radical view of economic equality, namely, that “justice requires (virtually) unqualified equality itself.” This essay focuses on two issues at the heart of Cohen’s critique, namely, his argument that economic equality is a moral as well as a political responsibility, and his interrogatory question: “If you’re an egalitarian, (...)
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  33. Two Demands Upon Luck Egalitarians.Eric Mack - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):233-259.
    I offer two objections to luck egalitarianism. The no-adequate-account objection takes note of the egalitarian insistence that the disvalue of inequality is only one of a plurality of values or disvalues that needs to be considered in arriving at a judgment about the ranking of alternative distributions of welfare. This turn to pluralism places a reasonable demand upon luck egalitarianism to provide an account of how the different sorts of values or disvalues that are supposed to attach to available distributions (...)
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  34. Paradoxes of Egalitarianism: Practice, Moral Analysis, and Policy Prescriptions.Jeffrey Paul - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):59-72.
    This essay seeks to answer the question of how the behavior of wealthy advocates of some version of socialism can be reconciled with their advocacy of those ideas. The answer is that the conception of egalitarianism under which they choose to live is one that redistributes income, not wealth, while the egalitarianism that they advocate for others is that in which all wealth is the property of one person who decides how much will be distributed to others.
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  35. The Socialism of the Rich: Egalitarianism, Wealth, and Privilege in Academic Philosophy.John Meadowcroft - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):169-187.
    This essay explains the prevalence of egalitarian beliefs among academic philosophers, individuals who enjoy significant wealth and privilege. I argue that their egalitarianism does not present a “paradox of conviction,” as G. A. Cohen contends, but follows logically from the institutional structure of academic philosophy. This structure creates a “veil of insignificance” wherein philosophy is a moral performance that incentivizes the adoption of egalitarian beliefs. Philosophers also view the world from behind what is termed a “veil of privilege” that incentivizes (...)
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  36. What Does Egalitarianism Require?David Schmidtz - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):1-12.
    Rawlsian theory notoriously claims that basic principles of justice apply to the design of a society’s basic structure. G. A. Cohen found it disturbingly convenient to treat fundamental principles as merely political rather than personal—that is, as applying exclusively to questions of institutional design and saying nothing about how to live. Instead, to Cohen, a sincere champion of egalitarian principles would, as they say, “walk the talk.”.
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  37. Worker Participation and the Egalitarian Conception of Fair Market Exchange.Thomas Christiano - 2022 - Social Philosophy and Policy 39 (2):73-98.
    I argue for an egalitarian conception of market exchange that places the idea of equal power at the center of a procedural evaluation of markets. I explain the fundamental concept of equal power in markets and show that the egalitarian conception gives us a remedial basis for society shaping markets so that they allow a significant place for worker participation in firms. I use the phrase “worker participation” to mean that workers participate in the authoritative direction of the firm. This (...)
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  38. Lockean Proviso and Basic Income.Konstantin Morozov - 2022 - Problems of Ethics 11:29-46.
    Libertarianism is a theory of justice that places significant moral weight on exclusive property rights. On this basis, many libertarian philosophers, from Robert Nozick to Michael Huemer, criticize any form of income redistribution. Ironically, some libertarians, following Philippe Van Parijs, Matt Zwolinski, and Charles Murray, have supported the introduction of an unconditional basic income. This essay seeks to prove that this support is not just a political compromise. By contrast, libertarian justice advocates have a strong moral basis for supporting income (...)
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  39. Inequalities in Prospective Life Expectancy: Should Luck Egalitarians Care?Shlomi Segall - 2024 - In Ben Davies, Gabriel De Marco, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu (eds.), Responsibility and Healthcare. Oxford University Press USA.
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  40. Does Political Equality Require Equal Power? A Pluralist Account.Attila Mráz - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    (OPEN ACCESS) In this paper, I criticize two views on how political equality is related to equally distributed political power, and I offer a novel, pluralist account of political equality to address their shortcomings—in particular, concerning their implications for affirmative action in the political domain, political representation, and the situation of permanent minorities. The Equal Power View holds that political equality requires equally distributed political power. It considers affirmative action—e.g., racial or gender electoral quotas—, representation, and more-than-equal power to permanent (...)
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  41. Descartes et l’égalité des esprits.Édouard Mehl - 2014 - L’Enseignement Philosophique 64 (2):23-36.
  42. Hybrid Ethical Theory and Cohen’s Critique of Rawls’s Egalitarian Liberalism.Jamie Buckland - forthcoming - Moral Philosophy and Politics.
    This article examines G. A. Cohen’s endorsement of a hybrid ethical theory and its relationship to his critique of John Rawls’s egalitarian liberalism. Cohen claimed that Rawls’s appeal to special incentives was a distortion of his own difference principle. I argue that Cohen’s acceptance of a personal prerogative (the central element of Samuel Scheffler’s version of a hybrid ethical theory) has several untoward consequences. First, it illuminates how any reasonable challenge to Rawls’s liberalism must recognise Thomas Nagel’s arguments concerning the (...)
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  43. Vote markets, democracy and relational egalitarianism.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2023 - Economics and Philosophy 39 (3):373-394.
    This paper expounds and defends a relational egalitarian account of the moral wrongfulness of vote markets according to which such markets are incompatible with our relating to one another as equals qua people with views on what we should collectively decide. Two features of this account are especially interesting. First, it shows why vote markets are objectionable even in cases where standard objections to them, such as the complaint that they result in inequality in opportunity for political influence across rich (...)
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  44. Resettling Refugees: State Obligations, Egalitarian Concerns.Jennifer Kling - 2022 - The Acorn 22 (2):83-101.
    This article—a tribute to philosopher Bat-Ami Bar On—argues that states have obligations to not only resettle refugees, but also to put into place laws, policies, and procedures that are likely to ameliorate exclusionary attitudes and socio-political stances of existing members toward refugees and other forcibly displaced persons. The article begins with a recollection of Bar On, who encouraged the author to pursue the well-being of refugees as a worthy philosophical topic. The article then argues that refugee camps do not serve (...)
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  45. Meaning, medicine, and merit.Andreas Mogensen - manuscript
    Given the inevitability of scarcity, should public institutions ration healthcare resources so as to prioritize those who contribute more to society? Intuitively, we may feel that this would be somehow inegalitarian. I argue that the egalitarian objection to prioritizing treatment on the basis of patients’ usefulness to others is best thought of as semiotic: i.e. as having to do with what this practice would mean, convey, or express about a person’s standing. I explore the implications of this conclusion when taken (...)
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  46. The Nash bargaining solution: sometimes more utilitarian, sometimes more egalitarian.Shiran Rachmilevitch - 2023 - Theory and Decision 95 (3):457-464.
    The first-order condition of the Nash bargaining solution equates the ratio of utilities to the ratio of marginal utilities. It turns out that this common ratio plays a role in determining whether the Nash solution, roughly speaking, is “more utilitarian” or “more egalitarian.” More specifically, I propose a sense of proximity to utilitarianism and/or egalitarianism according to which, in bargaining problems with distinct utilitarian and egalitarian points, the Nash solution is closer to utilitarianism if the aforementioned ratio is smaller than (...)
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  47. Desert and Economic Interdependence.Evan Behrle - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy.
    Outside of philosophy, the idea that workers deserve to be paid according to their productive contributions is very popular. But political philosophers have given it relatively little attention. In this paper, I argue against the attempt to use this idea about desert and contribution to vindicate significant income inequality. I claim that the inegalitarian invocation of reward according to contribution fails on its own terms when the following condition holds: the size of each worker's contribution depends on what others only (...)
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  48. Causal Selection and Egalitarianism.Jon Bebb & Helen Beebee - 2024 - In Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Volume 5. Oxford University Press.
    The chapter explores whether, or to what extent, recent work in experimental philosophy puts pressure on the idea that the concept of causation is ‘egalitarian’. Causal selection – where experimental subjects tend to rate the causal strength of (for example) a norm-violator more strongly than a non-norm-violator – is a well established phenomenon, and is in prima facie tension with an egalitarian conception of causation; it also, indirectly, puts prima facie pressure on the idea that causation is a worldly phenomenon (...)
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  49. An Egalitarian Case for Class-Specific Political Institutions.Vincent Harting - 2023 - Political Theory 51 (5):843-868.
    Political theorists concerned with ways to counteract the oligarchic tendencies of representative government have recently paid more attention to the employment of “class-specific institutions” (CSIs)—that is, political institutions that formally exclude wealthy elites from decision-making power. This article disputes a general objection levelled against the justifiability of CSIs, according to which their democratic credentials are outweighed by their explicit transgression of formal political equality—what I call the political equality objection. I claim that, although CSIs do not satisfy political equality fully, (...)
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  50. Book Review: The Dawn of Everything. [REVIEW]Steven Foertsch - 2023 - Humanity and Society:1-3.
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