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  1. “What Can I Possibly Do?”: White Individual Responsibility for Addressing Racism as a Public Health Crisis.Nabina K. Liebow & Travis N. Rieder - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  2. Racism in Child Welfare: Ethical Considerations of Harm.Emily Berkman, Emily Brown, Maya Scott & Alicia Adiele - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  3. Interpersonal Racism in the Healthcare Workplace: Examining Insidious Collegial Interactions Reinforcing Structural Racism.Abbas Rattani - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (2):307-314.
    The traumatic stress experienced by our black healthcare colleagues is often overlooked. This work contextualizes workplace racism, identifies some interpersonal barriers limiting anti-racist growth, and calls for solidarity.
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  4. Racismo Reverso E o Programa Trainee Magazine Luiza 2021.Marcelo Brandão Araujo - 2021 - Odeere 6 (2):438-457.
    A precariedade ou até mesmo a ausência de políticas públicas que concorram efetivamente a favor da diminuição da desigualdade racial dificulta que negros ocupem cargos considerados de maior destaque, prestígio na iniciativa privada e no serviço público. Além disso, apesar do senso comum de que não existe racismo no Brasil, quaisquer inciativas de inclusão racial são amplamente criticadas, principalmente no âmbito das redes sociais, por indivíduos contrários ao protagonismo negro no mundo do trabalho. Inclusive, nessa perspectiva, no ambiente interacional tecnológico (...)
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  5. Beyond Human Nature: Human-Racism in the Debate Over Genetic and Nanotechnological Enhancement.James J. Hughes - 2007 - In Nanoscale. New York, NY, USA: pp. 61-70.
    The alleged threats to human nature are at the root of many concerns about the use of nanotechnology to extend human health and capabilities. Bu the concept of human nature is illusory, selectively deployed, and does not impose any ethical constraint on human enhancement. Human nature is not only a meaningless concept, a product of our imperfect human cognition and a relic of the idea of a "soul," but, as it is deployed today against human enhancement technologies, it is also (...)
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  6. Humanism for Personhood: Against Human-Racism: A New Fight for Human Rights.James Hughes - 2004 - Free Inquiry 1 (June):36-37.
    In the coming decades humanists and trans-humanists need to wage a global campaign to radicalize the idea of human rights. We need to assert our rights to control our own bodies and brains, whether we choose to change our genders or medicate our brains. We need to assert that the measure of a society’s fairness is how universally available we make the prerequisites for achieving our fullest potential. We need to defend the right to enhance ourselves - whether through education (...)
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  7. Questioning the Assumptions of Moralism, Universalism, and Interpretive Dominance in Racist Monument Debates.Dan Demetriou - forthcoming - Public Affairs Quarterly.
    This essay questions three widespread assumptions in monument debates it terms “moralism,” “universalism,” and “interpretive dominance.” Roughly: moralism assumes that memorials should be only to good people or good causes; universalism holds that memorials should represent or be “for” the whole polity or its (real or supposed) corporate values; interpretive dominance maintains that, when faced with monuments with reasonable qualifying and disqualifying interpretations, policy should respond to the disqualifying one(s). These assumptions do not settle the debates between removalists and preservationists, (...)
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  8. Enacting Ought: Ethics, Anti-Racism, and Interactional Possibilities.George N. Fourlas & Elena Clare Cuffari - forthcoming - Topoi:1-17.
    Focusing on political and interpersonal conflict in the U.S., particularly racial conflict, but with an eye to similar conflicts throughout the world, we argue that the enactive approach to mind as life can be elaborated to provide an exigent framework for present social-political problems. An enactive approach fills problematic lacunae in the Western philosophical ethics project by offering radically refigured notions of responsibility and language. The dual enactive, participatory insight is that interactional responsibility is not singular and language is not (...)
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  9. The ‘Ethic of Knowledge’ and Responsible Science: Responses to Genetically Motivated Racism.Natan Elgabsi - 2021 - Social Studies of Science:1-21.
    This study takes off from the ethical problem that racism grounded in population genetics raises. It is an analysis of four standard scientific responses to the problem of genetically motivated racism, seen in connection with the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP): (1) Discriminatory uses of scientific facts and arguments are in principle ‘misuses’ of scientific data that the researcher cannot be further responsible for. (2) In a strict scientific sense, genomic facts ‘disclaim racism’, which means that an epistemically correct grasp (...)
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  10. ‘Mad’, Bad or Muslim? The UK's Vulnerability Support Hubs and the Nexus of Mental Health, Counterterrorism and Racism.Hil Aked - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  11. Making Sense of Shame in Response to Racism.Aness Kim Webster - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Some people of colour feel shame in response to racist incidents. This phenomenon seems puzzling since, plausibly, they have nothing to feel shame about. This puzzle arises because we assume that targets of racism feel shame about their race. However, I propose that when an individual is racialised as non-White in a racist incident, shame is sometimes prompted, not by a negative self-assessment of her race, but by her inability to choose when her stigmatised race is made salient. I argue (...)
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  12. Le Racisme Antinoir, L’Antisémitisme Et L’ÉtatAntiblackness, Antisemitism, and the State. Fanon, the Frankfurt School, and the Social Contract Tradition.Martin Shuster - 2021 - Les Cahiers Philosophiques de Strasbourg 50:13-52.
  13. Pueblos indígenas. Racismo, genocidio y represión.Liliana Tamagno - 2011 - Corpus.
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  14. Institutional Procedural Discrimination, Institutional Racism, and Other Institutional Discrimination: A Nursing Research Example.Sungwon Lim, Doris M. Boutain, Eunjung Kim, Robin A. Evans-Agnew, Sanithia Parker & Rebekah Maldonado Nofziger - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry.
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  15. Reproductive Justice for the Haunted Nordic Welfare State: Race, Racism, and Queer Bioethics in Finland.Tiia Sudenkaarne & Mwenza Blell - forthcoming - Bioethics.
  16. Racism and the Case for Reparations: A Response to Michael Banner.Chigor Chike - 2022 - Studies in Christian Ethics 35 (1):63-67.
    Racism, that is, the idea that White people are innately superior to people of other ethnicities, especially Black people, is a lie that supported slavery and the slave trade. That lie continues to shape all our lives today including our attitude to the issue of paying reparations to the enslaved. Not only was the original idea of a hierarchy or races a lie, but other falsehoods have been used to hide the atrocities and injustices that were committed based on that (...)
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  17. The Quest for a Global Age of Reason. Part II: Cultural Appropriation and Racism in the Name of Enlightenment.Dag Herbjørnsrud - 2021 - Dialogue and Universalism 31 (3):133-155.
    The Age of Enlightenment is more global and complex than the standard Eurocentric Colonial Canon narrative presents. For example, before the advent of unscientific racism and the systematic negligence of the contributions of Others outside of “White Europe,” Raphael centered Ibn Rushd in his Vatican fresco “Causarum Cognitio” ; the astronomer Edmund Halley taught himself Arabic to be more enlightened; The Royal Society of London acknowledged the scientific method developed by Ibn Al-Haytham. In addition, if we study the Transatlantic texts (...)
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  18. Biopolitics and Racist Ideology in Bolivia. Biopolítica e ideología racista en Bolivia.Osman Daniel Choque Aliaga - 2021 - Cuadernos de Filosofía Latinoamericana 42 (125):20-53.
    The concept of biopolitics is undoubtedly situated in contemporary reflections with Michel Foucault as one of its notable representatives in theoretical development. In this sense, recent research, even stepping away from the ideas put forward by Foucault, has given way to valuable notions, as in the cases of Esposito, Agamben, and Lemke. Evidently, racism becomes important because of its magnitude and, above all, the actuality that crosses the limits in the complex Bolivian reality. The relationship between racism and biopolitics converges (...)
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  19. Telling Lies, Telling Tales and Telling (and Doing) the Truth: Racism, Moral Repair and the Case for Reparations.Michael Banner - 2022 - Studies in Christian Ethics 35 (1):41-62.
    First, in the section ‘Telling Lies’, this article attempts to illustrate recent everyday racism. Racism has a history and takes many different forms. I describe a particular practice of racism, which relied, for its doctrine, on supposedly scientific assumptions about biology and breeding—and received a confirming fillip through the celebration of monarchy, empire and rose-tinted history. Second, in ‘Telling Tales’, the story of Zacchaeus is taken as exemplifying a form of moral repair in which telling and doing the truth are (...)
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  20. Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America by Ibram X. Kendi.Robin Friedman - 2021 - Education and Culture 37 (1):143-149.
    During an April 12, 1860, Senate debate, Senator Jefferson Davis spoke against a bill to fund Black education in Washington, D.C. Davis argued that the United States government was founded “by white men for white men” and “not for negroes.” According to Davis, the inequality of the white and black races was “stamped from the beginning.”Davis’s phrase forms the basis of Ibram X. Kendi’s 2016 National Book Award–winning study, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. (...)
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  21. Knowing How to Feel: Racism, Resilience, and Affective Resistance.Taylor Rogers - forthcoming - Hypatia:1-23.
    This article explores the affective dimension of resilient epistemological systems. Specifically, I argue that responsible epistemic practice requires affective engagement with nondominant experiences. To begin, I outline Kristie Dotson's account of epistemological resilience whereby an epistemological system remains stable despite counterevidence or attempts to alter it. Then, I develop an account of affective numbness. As I argue, affective numbness can promote epistemological resilience in at least two ways. First, it can reinforce harmful stereotypes even after these stereotypes have been rationally (...)
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  22. Racial Injustice and Information Flow.Eric Bayruns García - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4):1-18.
    I submit that the critical epistemology of race and standpoint literature has not explicitly focused on the properties of information about, say, racial or gender injustice in a way similar to how epistemologists have focused on propositions and information when they describe propositional justification. I describe information in the racial-injustice-information domain in a way similar to how epistemologists describe propositional justification. To this end, I argue (C1) that if subjects in racially unjust societies tend to violate norms that promote a (...)
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  23. Judging Students and Racial Injustice.Eric Bayruns Garcia - 2021 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 1 (21):15-20.
    I will argue that just and accurate assessment must involve taking into account how racial injustice affects students’ performance in their work. To this end, I will motivate what I call the RACIAL-INJUSTICE-ASSESSMENT THESIS. According to this thesis, instructors must account for how racial injustice affects a student’s work for an instructor’s judgment of her work to count as just. To motivate the RACIAL-INJUSTICE ASSESSMENT THESIS, I will defend the ACCURACY THESIS and the JUSTICE THESIS. According to the ACCURACY THESIS, (...)
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  24. Patterned Inequality, Compounding Injustice, and Algorithmic Prediction.Benjamin Eidelson - 2021 - American Journal of Law and Equality 1 (1):252-276.
    If whatever counts as merit for some purpose is unevenly distributed, a decision procedure that accurately sorts people on that basis will “pick up” and reproduce the pre-existing pattern in ways that more random, less merit-tracking procedures would not. This dynamic is an important cause for concern about the use of predictive models to allocate goods and opportunities. In this article, I distinguish two different objections that give voice to that concern in different ways. First, decision procedures may contribute to (...)
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  25. Le Football, Passerelle Idéologique de la Racialisation Raciste.Jean-Marie Brohm, Fabien Ollier & Raymond Sémédo - 2021 - Cités 3:245-254.
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  26. Against Simple Removal: A Defence of Defacement as a Response to Racist Monuments.Macalester Bell - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
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  27. Effect of Framings of Racism on White Students' Resistance to Confronting Whiteness.Maile Blume - unknown
    The proposed experimental study seeks to explore under what conditions white participants might demonstrate less behavioral resistance to engaging in conversations about racism. In this study, approximately 128 white-identifying students at Scripps College will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions: a non-racist framing condition or an anti-racist framing condition. After completing the framing task, participants will be asked to imagine that they are going to meet with a group of Students of Color to discuss the issue of the (...)
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  28. Pentecostalismos, racismo e Direitos Humanos.David Mesquiati de Oliveira & Kenner Roger Cazotto Terra - forthcoming - Horizonte:98-98.
    Pentecostalism meant a break with Protestant anthropology hostage to the epistemology of Modernity. As Havey Cox explains, these American movements in the early years of the 20th century filled the ecstatic deficit left by evangelicals, pointing towards the affective system of knowledge of reality, an affective epistemology. If, on the one hand, the Pentecostal experience encouraged the shift from the margin to the center of corporeality, on the other, the violated and subjugated bodies became visible and empowered, because marginalized groups, (...)
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  29. Black Lives Matter and the Removal of Racist Statues. Perspectives of an African.Caesar Alimsinya Atuire - 2020 - 21: Inquiries Into Art, History and the Visuual 1 (2).
    The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officers and the subsequent Black Lives Matter protests have been accompanied by calls for the removal of statues of racists from public space. This has generated debate about the role of statues in the public sphere. I argue that statues are erected to represent a chosen narrative about history. The debate about the removal of statues is a controversy about history and how we relate to it. From this perspective, the Black Lives (...)
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  30. Reply to My Critics: (Re-)Defining Racism: A Philosophical Analysis.Alberto G. Urquidez - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (3):679-698.
    In Defining Racism, I offer the first comprehensive examination of the philosophical literature on racism and argue for a new methodological approach that I call conventionalism. Framing my argument within this approach, I defend an oppression theory of racism. In this article, I will attempt to accomplish two goals: offer a reply to the thoughtful comments of my critics, and lay out the main argument and major themes of my book in an accessible manner. First, I will describe the philosophical (...)
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  31. Hegelian Heritage and Anti-Racist Horizons.Manuel Tangorra - 2021 - Idealistic Studies 51 (2):131-148.
    The task of confronting Hegel with the conflicts of our present proves to be indispensable to keep alive the critical scope of dialectics. In a context marked by a new wave of movements that challenge the racist structures that inform our societies, the question of the contribution of Hegelianism to an anti-racist thought takes a significant relevance.The hypothesis of this article argues that it is possible to distinguish two different operations that shape an anti-racist critique with the resources of Hegelian (...)
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  32. Theft in Broad Daylight: Racism and Neoliberal Legality.Brenna Bhandar - 2021 - Law and Critique 32 (3):285-299.
    In this article the author examines Fitzpatrick’s foundational critique of liberal legality and racism, a theme which remained central to his decades-long excavation of modern law’s self-identity. After considering Fitzpatrick’s ‘separation thesis’, the author then turns to consider the ways in which neoliberal legality is parasitic upon liberal legal racial formations while at the same time, obscuring the foundational place of race in contemporary capitalism by subsuming material life within its modes of value extraction.
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  33. Health Disparities, Systemic Racism, and Failures of Cultural Competence: Authors’ Response to Commentaries.Jeffrey Todd Berger & Dana Ribeiro Miller - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):1-3.
    The health system is, in particular ways, a microcosm of society and both reflects and contributes to its ills of racism, inequities, and disparities. As such, the house of medicine is obligated to...
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  34. Cultural Competence as New Racism: Working as Intended?Ranita Ray & Georgiann Davis - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):20-22.
    Berger and Miller offer a strong argument for how cultural competence in medical education reinforces the racial structures that it purports to address. As social scientists with expertise i...
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  35. Materializing Systemic Racism, Materializing Health Disparities.Vanessa Carbonell & Shen-yi Liao - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):16-18.
    The purpose of cultural competence education for medical professionals is to ensure respectful care and reduce health disparities. Yet as Berger and Miller (2021) show, the cultural competence framework is dated, confused, and self-defeating. They argue that the framework ignores the primary driver of health disparities—systemic racism—and is apt to exacerbate rather than mitigate bias and ethnocentrism. They propose replacing cultural competence with a framework that attends to two social aspects of structural inequality: health and social policy, and institutional-system activity; (...)
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  36. The Current State of Efforts to Address Disparities, Racism and Cultural Humility in Medical Education.Ross E. McKinney, Norma Poll-Hunter & Lisa D. Howley - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):1-3.
    Racism is a complex problem in the US that is institutionalized, personally mediated, and internalized. Within medical education the recognition and response to structural racism is be...
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  37. “Race Is a Fiction; Racism Is Not”? Understandings of Race in Antiracist Education.Gregory Bynum - 2021 - Educational Theory 71 (2):223-245.
  38. On Anticipatory-Epistemic Injustice and the Distinctness of Epistemic-Injustice Phenomena.Eric Bayruns Garcia - 2021 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 7 (10):48-57.
    I present distinctness conditions that an epistemic-injustice phenomenon should meet to count as distinct from other such phenomena and I use these conditions to evaluate anticipatory-epistemic injustice’s distinctness in relation to testimonial smothering. Even though I argue that the phenomenon that Lee helpfully describes may not be distinct from testimonial smothering, I argue that the notion of distinctness itself should not be the primary or most important criterion that epistemic-injustice theorists use to determine whether such phenomena should feature in the (...)
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  39. State Typohumanism and its Role in the Rise of Völkisch-Racism: Paideía and Humanitas at Issue in Jaeger’s and Krieck’s ‘Political Plato’.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (12):1272-1282.
    The aim of this article is to provide a philosophical conceptual framework to understand the theoretical roots and political implications of the interpretations of Plato’s work in Jaeger’s Third Humanism and Krieck’s völkisch-racist pedagogy and anthropology. This article will seek to characterize, as figures of localitas, their conceptions of the individual, community, corporeality, identity, and the State that both authors developed departing from Platonic political philosophy. My main hypothesis is that Jaeger’s and Krieck’s interpretations of Platonic paideía shared several core-elements (...)
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  40. Fighting Environmental Racism.Margaret Betz - 2021 - The Philosophers' Magazine 94:45-48.
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  41. “So, Sue Me:” Medical Professionals Should Support Title VI Civil Rights Law Improvements as Part of Their Anti-Racism Work.Wendy Dunne DiChristina - 2021 - Voices in Bioethics 7.
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  42. Culturele Racisten, Neo-Nazi's of Papieren Tijgers? : Bespreking van Recente Nederlandstalige Literatuur Over Extreem-Rechtse Partijen in Europa.Georgi Verbeeck & Hans De Witte - 1995 - Res Publica 37 (2):263-270.
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  43. Perspective: Wake-Up Call Health Care and Racism.John R. Stone & Annette Dula - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (4):48.
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  44. Branquitude, racismo e sexismo em docências realizadas por mulheres negras no ensino de história.Carla Beatriz Meinerz, Priscila de Souza Santos & Priscila Nunes Pereira - 2021 - Odeere 6 (1):109-137.
    Objetiva-se no texto analisar o ensino de história na formação inicial e continuada, através do estágio docente obrigatório em espaços escolares, tematizando o racismo institucional e o sexismo. O conceito de racismo institucional será interseccionado com o de sexismo, pois a análise destaca fenômenos observados com jovens estudantes negras, licenciandas do Curso de História da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Sob a perspectiva da abordagem qualitativa, consideram-se as práticas pedagógicas, construídas em processos de ensino e pesquisa, desenvolvidas a (...)
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  45. When Students Rally for Anti-Racism. Engaging with Racial Literacy in Higher Education.Hari Prasad Adhikari-Sacré & Kris Rutten - 2021 - Philosophies 6 (2):48.
    Despite a decade of diversity policy plans, a wave of student rallies has ignited debates across western European university campuses. We observe these debates from a situated call for anti-racism in Belgian higher education institutions, and critically reflect on the gap between diversity policy discourse and calls for anti-racism. The students’ initiatives make a plea for racial literacy in the curriculum, to foster a critical awareness on how racial hierarchies have been educated through curricula and institutional processes. Students rethink race (...)
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  46. A Stoic Approach to Racism.Frank Thermitus - 2021 - Philosophy Now 144:14-16.
    Rather than imagining an ideal world, Stoics try to manage their emotions in order to deal with the world as it is. With this in mind, Stoicism would suggest that people of color should begin each day by reminding themselves, “I will face racism, I will be stereotyped, I will be racially profiled, I will face racial discrimination, and people will be culturally or racially insensitive.”.
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  47. Peirce and Racism: Biographical and Philosophical Considerations: Presidential Address.Michael L. Raposa - 2021 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 57 (1):32-44.
  48. Distributive Justice as a Means of Combating Systemic Racism in Healthcare.Derek Soled - 2021 - Voices in Bioethics 7.
  49. Against Simple Removal: A Defence of Defacement as a Response to Racist Monuments.Macalester Bell - forthcoming - Wiley: Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Journal of Applied Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  50. From Boas to Black Power: Racism, Liberalism, and American Anthropology.[author unknown] - 2019
1 — 50 / 677