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  1. 4 Equality of What?Alex Callinicos - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader.
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  2. The Quest for a Moral Compass: A Global History of Ethics.Derek Clifford - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-3.
  3. Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  4. Introduction for Book symposium on Andrea Sangiovanni’s Humanity without Dignity.Johannes Haaf, Jan-Philipp Kruse & Luise K. Müller - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511989007.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
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  5. The Illusion of Meritocracy.Tong Zhang - forthcoming - Social Science Information.
    Meritocracy claims to reward the meritorious with more resources, thereby achieving social efficiency and justice in a level playground. This article argues that the rise of meritocracy in a society is the institutional consequence of adopting progressive humanism, an ideal-type worldview that advocates the harmonious co-realization of individual achievement and social contribution. However, meritocracy is a self-defeating illusion because, even in a level playground, it only rewards conspicuous and wasteful display of ‘merit’ rather than genuine contributions to society. Similar to (...)
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  6. Diversity, Polycentricity, Justice, and the Open Society.Michael Moehler - 2024 - In Michael Moehler & John Thrasher (eds.), New Approaches to Social Contract Theory: Liberty, Equality, Diversity, and the Open Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 227-251.
    Moral diversity poses significant challenges for normative theory building, because no particular conception of justice may be agreeable to all members of society. Polycentrism offers a potential solution by allowing a plurality of local regulative principles. For deeply diverse societies, however, polycentrism fails conceptually. This chapter argues that Moehler’s (2018) multilevel social contract theory can overcome this problem. The theory disposes the quest for justice as the sole and exclusive objective and considers agents’ liberty and peaceful interaction as the primary (...)
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  7. New Approaches to Social Contract Theory: Liberty, Equality, Diversity, and the Open Society.Michael Moehler & John Thrasher (eds.) - 2024 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This book features new approaches to social contract theory. Whereas traditional social contract theories and their adaptations in the twentieth century were developed for fairly homogeneous societies, societies in the twenty-first century often are characterized by conflicting first-order directives that stem from deep moral, political, religious, and cultural diversity. To address such diversity and the complexities of contemporary societies, new approaches (including formal approaches) to social contract theory have emerged that re-envision the social contract for a fragmented and sometimes polarized, (...)
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  8. New Social Contract Theory.Michael Moehler & John Thrasher - 2024 - In Michael Moehler & John Thrasher (eds.), New Approaches to Social Contract Theory: Liberty, Equality, Diversity, and the Open Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 3-14.
    Social contract theory enjoys a long history in moral and political philosophy. Since the European Enlightenment, social contract theory has become one of the most important traditions in moral and political philosophy. This chapter provides a brief introduction to central concepts in social contract theory and their development over time. Most importantly, the chapter clarifies some of the distinct features of new approaches to social contract theory (or “new social contract theory” for short) that have evolved in the twenty-first century (...)
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  9. Relative priority.Lara Buchak - 2023 - Economics and Philosophy 39 (2):199-229.
    The good of those who are worse off matters more to the overall good than the good of those who are better off does. But being worse off than one’s fellows is not itself bad; nor is inequality itself bad; nor do differences in well-being matter more when well-being is lower in an absolute sense. Instead, the good of the relatively worse-off weighs more heavily in the overall good than the good of the relatively better-off does, in virtue of the (...)
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  10. Are Adults and Children One Another’s Moral Equals?Giacomo Floris - 2023 - The Journal of Ethics 27 (1):31-50.
    The question of the basis of human equality has recently gained increasing attention. However, much of the literature has focused on whether persons—understood as fully competent adults—have equal moral status, while relatively less attention has been devoted to the analysis of what grounds the equal moral status of those human beings who are not fully competent adults. This paper contributes to this debate by addressing the question of the equality of moral status between adults and children. Specifically, this paper has (...)
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  11. “That the Earth Belongs in Usufruct to the Living": Intergenerational Philanthropy and the Problem of Dead-Hand Control.Theodore M. Lechterman - 2023 - In Ray Madoff & Benjamin Soskis (eds.), Giving in Time: Temporal Considerations in Philanthropy. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 93-116.
    Intergenerational transfers are a core feature of the practice of private philanthropy. A substantial portion of the resources committed to charitable causes comes from transfers (either during life or at death) that continue to pay out after death. Indeed, much of the power of the charitable foundation lies in its ability to extend the life of an enterprise beyond the mortal existence of its initiating agents. Despite their prevalence, whether and in what way the instruments of intergenerational philanthropy can be (...)
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  12. Caught in a School Choice Quandary: What should an equity-minded parent do?Michael Merry - 2023 - Theory and Research in Education 21 (2):155-175.
    In this article, I examine a case involving an equity-minded parent caught in a quandary about which school to select for her child, knowing that her decision may have consequences for others. To do so, I heuristically construct a fictional portrait and explore the deliberative process a parent might have through a dialogue taking place among ‘friends’, where each friend personifies a different set of ethical considerations. I then briefly consider two competing philosophical assessments but argue that neither position helpfully (...)
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  13. Relational Equality.Yuichiro Mori - 2023 - Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy.
  14. Colonialism, territory and pre-existing obligations.Cara Nine - 2023 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 26 (2):277-287.
    In ‘What’s Wrong with Colonialism,’ Lea Ypi argues that the wrong of colonialism can be expressed as procedural wrongs, not as wronging territorial rights. On her view, colonial practices went wrong in two ways: they forced residents into political associations, and the terms of the political association were not established through equal and reciprocal negotiations. I argue that because Ypi’s account successfully side-lines all but essential claims to territory, her theory ends up being vulnerable to an objection it means to (...)
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  15. Why we should care about poverty and inequality: exploring the grounds for a pluralist approach.Irene Bucelli - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (2):165-186.
    Policy debates surrounding poverty and inequality often focus on practical solutions and seldom explore the normative underpinning that would justify our concerns with these phenomena. Why should we care about poverty, or about inequality? From a philosophical standpoint, can we separate the two, such that it is possible to be deeply concerned about poverty but unconcerned about inequalities? Do our reasons for caring about one contrast with our reasons for caring about the other? While there is a growing empirical literature (...)
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  16. Libertarianism, the Family, and Children.Andrew Jason Cohen & Lauren Hall - 2022 - In Benjamin Ferguson & Matthew Zwolinski (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Libertarianism. NY: Routledge. pp. 336-350.
    We explain libertarian thought about family and children, including controversial issues in need of serious attention. To begin our discussion of marriage, we distinguish between procedural and substantive contractarian approaches to marriage, each endorsed by various libertarians. Advocates of both approaches agree that it is a contract that makes a marriage, not a license, but disagree about whether there are moral limits to the substance of the contract with only advocates of the substantive approach accepting such. Either approach, though, offers (...)
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  17. Educational adequacy and educational equality: a merging proposal.Fernando De-Los-Santos-Menéndez - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (6):787-808.
    A good education provides useful ‘knowledge, skills, attitudes, and dispositions’ (Brighouse, Ladd, Loeb, & Swift, 2016, p. 6).1 Educational justice cares about the distribution of these goods beca...
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  18. Kant, coercion, and the legitimation of inequality.Benjamin L. McKean - 2022 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 25 (4):528-550.
    Immanuel Kant’s political philosophy has enjoyed renewed attention as an egalitarian alternative to contemporary inequality since it seems to uncompromisingly reassert the primacy of the state over the economy, enabling it to defend the modern welfare state against encroaching neoliberal markets. However, I argue that, when understood as a free-standing approach to politics, Kant’s doctrine of right shares essential features with the prevailing theories that legitimate really existing economic inequality. Like Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman, Kant understands the state’s function (...)
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  19. Poverty, Dignity, and the Kingdom of Ends.Corinna Mieth & Garrath Williams - 2022 - In Jan-Willem van Der Rijt & Adam Cureton (eds.), Human Dignity and the Kingdom of Ends: Kantian Perspectives and Practical Applications. New York: Routledge. pp. 206-223.
    In this chapter we argue that poverty should be seen as a violation of dignity, drawing on two of Kant’s formulations of the Categorical Imperative – the formula of humanity and the formula of the kingdom of ends. In our view, poverty should not be seen primarily in terms of exploitation, nor of failures to help people in need. A Kantian perspective should give proper weight to the actual and potential agency of those who suffer poverty. This is a question (...)
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  20. Divested: Inequality in the Age of Finance, by Ken-Hou Lin and Megan Tobias Neely. New York: Oxford University Press, 2020. 232 pp. [REVIEW]Kenneth Silver - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):203-207.
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  21. “Nothing much had happened”: Settler colonialism in Hannah Arendt.David Myer Temin - 2022 - European Journal of Political Theory 21 (3):514-538.
    Hannah Arendt’s account of imperialism has become an unlikely source of inspiration for scholars invested in anti-colonial and postcolonial critique. However, the role of settler colonialism in her thought has come under far less scrutiny. This essay reconstructs Arendt’s account of settler-colonization. It argues that Arendt’s republican analysis of imperialism hinges on her notion of the boomerang effect, which is absent in settler-colonial contexts. Arendt recognized some of the distinctive features of settler expansionism but reproduced many of the ideologies that (...)
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  22. What liberals should tolerate internationally.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):64-86.
    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on what liberal states should tolerate outside their borders. This requires definitions of `liberalism, ́ `toleration, ́ and `state. ́ In the first section of this paper, I briefly indicate how I use those and other terms necessary to the discussion and introduce the normative principle I take liberals to be committed to. In the second section, I continue clearing the path for the rest of my discussion. In the rest of (...)
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  23. Republican environmental rights.Ashley Dodsworth - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (5):710-724.
  24. Education, epistemic virtues, and the power of toleration.Johannes Drerup - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):108-131.
  25. The politics and ethics of toleration: introduction.Johannes Drerup & Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):1-4.
  26. Pluralism and the authority of groups to discriminate.Avigail Eisenberg - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (6):909-930.
  27. De-Moralizing Gay Rights– an overview.Cyril Ghosh - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1056-1060.
    In this overview, I begin by situating De-Moralizing Gay Rights within the field of queer studies/queer theory. I then delineate the book’s principal arguments. The book critically interrogates three sets of distortions in 21st century public discourse on LGBT+ rights in the United States. The first relates to the critique of pinkwashing, often advanced by scholars who claim to be proponents of a radical politics. I suggest that this critique sometimes suffers from analytical overreach. The second concerns a recent US (...)
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  28. Covering and the moral duty to resist oppression.Peter Higgins - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1068-1075.
    Do LGBT+ persons have a moral duty of some form to resist heterosexist oppression by refusing to “cover” (i.e., “to ‘disattend,’ or tone down, their (despised) sexuality in an effort to fit into and be accepted by the mainstream” (Ghosh 2018, 273))? Writing in response to Kenji Yoshino (Yoshino 2002 and 2006), Cyril Ghosh argues that such a duty would itself be oppressive. In this reply to Ghosh’s new book, I wish to argue that while Ghosh demonstrates that Yoshino’s critique (...)
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  29. Toleration and modus vivendi.John Horton - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):45-63.
  30. Why Adequacy Isn't Enough: Educational Justice, Positional Goods and Class Power.Joshua Kissel - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (2):287-301.
    Elizabeth Anderson and Debra Satz continue in the tradition of Plato with their work on the role of education in a just society. Both argue that a just society depends on education enabling citizens to realize democratic or civic equality and that this equality depends on sufficiency in the distribution of educational goods. I agree that education is important to preparing democratic citizens, but I disagree about the plausibility of sufficiency here, especially in the educational context. My argument is two‐fold: (...)
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  31. Can a value-neutral liberal state still be tolerant?Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):25-44.
    Toleration is typically defined as follows: an agent (A), for some reason, objects to certain actions or practices of someone else (B), but has outweighing other reasons to accept these actions or practices nonetheless and, thus, refrains from interfering with or preventing B from acting accordingly, although A has the power to interfere. So understood, (mutual) toleration is taken to allow for peaceful coexistence and ideally even cooperation amongst people who disagree with each other on crucial questions on how to (...)
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  32. Free to be you and me: an introduction to Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Patti Tamara Lenard - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1048-1055.
  33. Is Faith in School Integration Bad Faith?Michael S. Merry - 2021 - On Education 4 (11).
  34. Unjust History and Its New Reproduction—A Reply to My Critics.Alasia Nuti - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (5):1245-1259.
    Demands calling for reparations for historical injustices—injustices whose original victims and perpetrators are now dead—constitute an important component of contemporary struggles for social and transnational justice. Reparations are only one way in which the unjust past is salient in contemporary politics. In my book, Injustice and the Reproduction of History: Structural Inequalities, Gender and Redress, I put forward a framework to conceptualise the normative significance of the unjust past. In this article, I will engage with the insightful comments and try (...)
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  35. Inequality, Loneliness, and Political Appearance: Picturing Radical Democracy with Hannah Arendt and Jacques Rancière.Andrew Schaap - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (1):28-53.
    Radical democrats highlight dramatic moments of political action, which disrupt everyday habits of perception that sustain unequal social relations. In doing so, however, we sometimes neglect how social conditions—such as precarious employment, social dislocation, and everyday exposure to violence—undermine political agency or might be contested in uneventful ways. Despite their differences, two thinkers who have significantly influenced radical democratic theory have been similarly criticized for contributing to such a socially weightless picture of politics. However, attending to how they are each (...)
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  36. Civil liability and the 50%+ standard of proof.Martin Smith - 2021 - International Journal of Evidence and Proof 25 (3):183-199.
    The standard of proof applied in civil trials is the preponderance of evidence, often said to be met when a proposition is shown to be more than 50% likely to be true. A number of theorists have argued that this 50%+ standard is too weak – there are circumstances in which a court should find that the defendant is not liable, even though the evidence presented makes it more than 50% likely that the plaintiff’s claim is true. In this paper, (...)
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  37. The limits of liberal integrity.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):635-641.
    Nili’s important book presents us with an intriguing idea in chapter five. If we see the liberal state as having integrity then that means certain kinds of policies should be prioritized by the state. I cast doubt on this argument by contending that the priorities of liberal integrity are either no different from liberal egalitarianism or are misguided. I also argue that history has little normative force as Nili suggests.
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  38. Equality.Gosepath Stefan - 2021 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This article is concerned with social and political equality. In its prescriptive usage, ‘equality’ is a highly contested concept. Its normally positive connotation gives it a rhetorical power suitable for use in political slogans (Westen 1990). At least since the French Revolution, equality has served as one of the leading ideals of the body politic; in this respect, it is at present probably the most controversial of the great social ideals. There is controversy concerning the precise notion of equality, the (...)
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  39. On being good gay: ‘covering’ and the social structure of being LGBT+.Annamari Vitikainen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1083-1090.
  40. The significance of being gay in Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Kerri Woods - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (7):1076-1082.
  41. Racial Conflation: Agency, Black Action, and Criminal Intent.Alisa Bierria - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy (4):575-594.
  42. The value of longevity.Greg Bognar - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (3):229-247.
    Longevity is valuable. Most of us would agree that it’s bad to die when you could go on living, and death’s badness has to do with the value your life would have if it continued. Most of us would also agree that it’s bad if life expectancy in a country is low, it’s bad if there is high infant mortality and it’s bad if there is a wide mortality gap between different groups in a population. But how can we make (...)
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  43. The ethical imperatives of the COVID 19 pandemic: a review from data ethics.Gabriela Arriagada Bruneau, Vincent C. Müller & Mark S. Gilthorpe - 2020 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 46:13-35.
    In this review, we present some ethical imperatives observed in this pandemic from a data ethics perspective. Our exposition connects recurrent ethical problems in the discipline, such as, privacy, surveillance, transparency, accountability, and trust, to broader societal concerns about equality, discrimination, and justice. We acknowledge data ethics role as significant to develop technological, inclusive, and pluralist societies. - - - Resumen: En esta revisión, exponemos algunos de los imperativos éticos observados desde la ética de datos en esta pandemia. Nuestra exposición (...)
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  44. What Makes Epistemic Injustice an “Injustice”?Morten Fibieger Byskov - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):114-131.
  45. The good of toleration: changing social relations or maximising individual freedom?Emanuela Ceva - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (2):197-202.
    In this paper, I take issue with Peter Balint’s recent account of the value of toleration as an instrument for securing freedom-maximising outcomes in pluralistic societies. In particular, I question the extent to which the ideal of toleration can be entirely reduced to someone’s intentional withholding of negative interference whose value lies in the protection of individual negative freedoms. I argue that couching the value of toleration entirely in these freedom-maximising terms fails to do justice to the relational value of (...)
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  46. A Bleeding Heart Libertarian View of Inequality.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2020 - In Hugh Lafollette (ed.), Ethics in Practice: An Anthology, Fifth Edition. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 598-610.
    We live in a market system and witness much economic inequality. Although such inequality may not be an essential characteristic of market systems, it seems historically inevitable. How we should evaluate this inequality, on the other hand, is contentious. I propose that bleeding heart libertarians provide the best diagnosis and prescription.
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  47. Complicity and hypocrisy.Nicolas Cornell & Amy Sepinwall - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (2):154-181.
    This article offers a justification for accommodating claims of conscience. The standard justification points to the pain that acting against one’s conscience entails. But that defense cannot make sense of the state’s refusal to accommodate individuals where the law interferes with their deeply meaningful but nonmoral projects. An alternative justification, we argue, arises once one recognizes the connection between conscience and moral address: One’s lived moral convictions determine when and with what force one can hold others to account. Acting against (...)
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  48. The meek and the mighty: Two models of oppression.Yuna Blajer de la Garza - 2020 - Sage Publications: European Journal of Political Theory 21 (3):491-513.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Volume 21, Issue 3, Page 491-513, July 2022. This article is an exercise in theory-building about the stories that justify, feed upon, and reproduce systems of oppression. I argue that emotional narratives contribute to the constitution and reproduction of systems of oppression, and that different emotional narratives constitute different forms of oppression. I examine two of these emotional narratives: a narrative articulated around pity and a narrative that draws on fear. I propose that the former (...)
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  49. Against hands-on neutrality.Bouke Https://Orcidorg de Vries - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (4):424-446.
    In recent years, several theorists have defended a form of neutrality that seeks to equalise the benefits that state policies bestow upon citizens’ conceptions of the good life. For example, when state policies confer special benefits upon a conception that revolves around a particular culture, religion or type of sports, other cultures, religions or types of sports might be due compensation. This article argues that this kind of neutrality – which I refer to as ‘hands-on neutrality’ – cannot be vindicated, (...)
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  50. Species-being for whom? The five faces of interspecies oppression.Mathieu Dubeau - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):596-620.
    There is now an awakening to and recognition of the emotionally complex lives of some non-human animals. While their forms of consciousness may vary, some are indeed conscious and deserve political consideration. What that political consideration ought to be is the central topic of this article. First, I argue that interspecies justice must be understood in terms of the relationships that foster individual flourishing of all concerned. The obstacles to such flourishing are the five faces of oppression famously identified by (...)
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