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1572 found
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1 — 50 / 1572
  1. Albertus Magnus on Creation in Advance.Steven Baldner - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  2. David de Dinant. Sur le fragment des Quaternuli.Tristan Dagron - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    David de Dinant, dont les thèses ont été condamnées par le décret de 1210 de l'Université de Paris, est bien connu par les réfutations dont il a fait l'objet de la part d'Albert le Grand et Thomas d'Aquin. En se fondant sur ses Quaternuli, on se propose ici, non pas d'apporter des éléments biographiques nouveaux, mais de reconstituer les médiations qui ont conduit ce commentateur de la « philosophie naturelle » d'Aristote à défendre ses fameuses positions « panthéistes » et (...)
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  3. Gersonides Through the Ages.Gad Freudenthal, David Wirmer & Ofer Elior (eds.) - forthcoming
  4. Adam de Wodeham.John T. Slotemaker - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5. A Case of Aristotelian-Scholastic Non-Realism About Sensible Qualities: Peter Auriol on Sounds and Odours.Hamid Taieb - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    This paper presents the defense by the medieval philosopher Peter Auriol of the thesis that sounds and odors have no real, mind-independent being, but exist only as mental correlates of acts of hearing and smelling. Auriol does not see this as an idiosyncratic position, as he claims to be following not only Aristotle, but also Averroes on the issue. Since it is often thought that non-realism about sensible qualities was “inconceivable” for medieval authors and was made possible only by the (...)
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  6. Durand of St.-Pourçain on Reflex Acts and State Consciousness.Peter John Hartman - 2021 - Vivarium 59 (3):215-240.
    Some of my mental states are conscious and some of them are not. Sometimes I am so focused on the wine in front of me that I am unaware that I am thinking about it; but sometimes, of course, I take a reflexive step back and become aware of my thinking about the wine in front of me. What marks the difference between a conscious mental state and an unconscious one? In this paper, I focus on Durand of St.-Pourçain’s rejection (...)
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  7. The Potestas of Practice.Theodore Lechterman - 2021 - History of Political Thought 2 (42):240-251.
    Can the existence of a social practice justify practical authority? A medieval debate between hierocrats and caesaropapists may help to illuminate this question. Focusing mainly on Marsilius of Padua, with reference to John of Paris, this article suggests that caesaropapists can be read as developing a 'practice conception' of the structure and scope of ecclesiastical authority. Because it brings the conflict over authority to a new battleground, the practice conception supplies caesaropapists with a source of dialectical leverage over hierocratic doctrine. (...)
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  8. Thirteenth-Century Aristotelian Logic: The Study of Scientific Method.Ana Maria Mora-Marquez - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 9:146-185.
  9. Is Ars an Intellectual Virtue? John Buridan on Craft.Aline Medeiros Ramos - 2021 - In Isabelle Chouinard, Zoe McConaughey, Aline Medeiros Ramos & Roxane Noël (eds.), Women's perspectives on ancient and medieval philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: pp. 275-301.
    Scholarship on the philosophy of the Late Middle Ages has tended to overlook certain subject matters, especially some pertaining to ethics and political philosophy. My object of study in this paper is one of these overlooked notions, the idea of craft (ars) as an intellectual virtue. While recent publications have focused on sapientia and scientia, this paper aims to rehabilitate ars as a virtue, in particular John Buridan’s understanding of craft as an intellectual virtue in his Quaestiones super decem libros (...)
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  10. Giles of Rome on the Intensification of Forms.Jean-Luc Solère - 2021 - Quaestio 20:217-238.
    Quaestio, Volume 20, Issue, Page 217-238, January 2020.
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  11. 'They Tend Into Nothing by Their Own Nature': Rufus and an Anonymous De Generatione Commentary on the Principles of Corruptibility.Zita V. Toth - 2021 - In Lydia Schumacher (ed.), Early Thirteenth-Century English Franciscan Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 199--220.
    In this paper, I consider Richard Rufus’ account of generation and corrup- tion. This is a fundamental metaphysical question in the Aristotelian framework. Given that there are things that are corruptible (such as trees and cats and the human body), and things that are incorruptible (such as the celestial bodies and angels), what is it that makes one one, and the other the other? In other words, what is the ultimate explanation (in Rufus' terminology, the principle or principles) of corruptibility (...)
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  12. Strength And Superiority: The Theme Of Strength In The Querelle Des Femmes.Eric Wilkinson - 2021 - de Philosophia 1 (1):1-10.
    The querelle des femmes was an intellectual debate over the status of women that occurred in the early modern period, between the 1400s and 1700s. A common argument for the superiority of men and inferiority of women that appeared during the debate is that women are less physically strong than men, and are therefore inferior. In response, two distinct argumentative strategies were developed by defenders of women. First, some argued that men and women did not in fact differ in physical (...)
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  13. John Wyclif, Edited by Luigi Campi.Chris Schabel - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):351-356.
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  14. Wyclif's Logica and the Logica Oxoniensis.Mark Thakkar - 2020 - In Luigi Campi & Stefano Simonetta (eds.), Before and After Wyclif: Sources and Textual Influences. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 1-31.
    John Wyclif’s logical works have lain under a kind of fog since they were first published in the 1890s. My first aim is to clear up some long-standing confusions by dispelling this fog once and for all. A partial identification of Wyclif’s source material then allows me to make a more dramatic claim about persistent misunderstandings of what is thought to be his earliest work.
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  15. Duces Caecorum: On Two Recent Translations of Wyclif.Mark Thakkar - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):357-383.
    Two recent publications have greatly increased the amount of Wyclif available in translation: the Trialogus, translated by Stephen Lahey, and an anthology translated by Stephen Penn. This review article documents the failings that make these translations worse than useless. A post mortem leads me to claim that the publication of these volumes, the first of which has already been warmly received, is a sign of a gathering crisis in medieval studies, and one that we should take steps to avert.
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  16. Perceiving As: Non-Conceptual Forms of Perception in Medieval Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen - 2020 - In Elena Baltuta (ed.), Medieval Perceptual Puzzles: Theories of Sense Perception in 13th and 14th Centuries. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 10–37.
    The aim of this chapter is to take a closer look at medieval discussions concerning the phenomenon of ‘perceiving as,’ and the psychological mechanisms that lie behind it. In contemporary philosophical literature this notion is usually used to refer to conceptual aspects of perception. For instance, when I perceive a black birdlike shape as a crow, I may be said to perceive the particular sensible thing x as an instance of a universal crowness φ, that is, as belonging to a (...)
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  17. Peter of Palude and the Fiery Furnace.Zita Toth - 2020 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 37 (2):121-142.
    According to most medieval thinkers, whenever something causally acts on another thing, God also acts with it. Durand of St.-Pourçain, an early fourteenth-century Dominican philosopher, disagrees. This paper is about a fourteenth-century objection to Durand’s view, which I will call the Fiery Furnace Objection, as formulated by Durand’s contemporary, Peter of Palude. Although Peter of Palude is not usu- ally regarded as a particularly original thinker, this paper calls attention to one of his more interesting controversies with his fellow friar, (...)
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  18. Personhood, Ethics, and Disability: A Comparison of Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern Concepts of Personhood.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - In Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 80-108.
    This chapter compares three different general accounts of personhood (Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern) and argues that if personhood is the basis on which one has equal moral status in the moral community and the disability-positive position is correct, then the Byzantine and Boethian accounts are preferable over the Modern accounts that are surveyed here. It further argues that the Byzantine account is even friendlier to a disability-positive position compared to the Boethian account.
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  19. Nicola Cusano da Colonia a Roma (1425-1450). Università, politica e umanesimo nel giovane Cusano.Andrea Fiamma - 2019 - Münster, Germania: Aschendorff Verlag.
    Il volume ripercorre lo sviluppo del pensiero del giovane Nicola Cusano dalla frequentazione del maestro albertista Eimerico da Campo presso l’Università di Colonia (1425) e dal confronto con le posizioni filosofiche dei domenicani dello Studium coloniense, fino agli anni della maturità a Roma (1450). Il saggio illustra il contesto storico-culturale della genesi del De docta ignorantia, testo che suggella la presa di distanza di Cusano dal proprio passato universitario ma anche, al contempo, la sua insoddisfazione nei confronti dell’umanesimo diffuso in (...)
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  20. Meister Eckhart, der "Seelengrund", und das Verständnis von Bewusstsein.Alfred Gierer - 2019 - In Wissenschaftliches Denken, das Rätsel Bewusstsein und pro-religiöse Ideen. Würzburg, Germany: Königshausen&Neumann. pp. 61-64.
    An English translation of the essay and an extended introduction are included in the download. In diesem Essay geht es um ein religionsfreundliches Selbst- und Weltverständnis, das die Reichweite der menschlichen Vernunft ebenso wie deren intrinsische Grenzen achtet. In dem weiten Feld wählen wir hier Betrachtungen des mittelalterlichen Philosophen und Theologen Meister Eckhart aus. Eckhart (ca.1260-1338) gilt vielen als Mystiker, anderen als Philosophen des Christentums. Er war wohl Beides. Philosophisch ist seine Lehre, die einzelne menschliche Seele habe einen göttlichen, unvergänglichen (...)
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  21. To Copy, To Impress, To Distribute: The Beginning of European Printing.Bennett Gilbert - 2019 - On_Culture.
    In order to distribute our thoughts and feelings, we must make intelligible and distributable copies of them. From approximately 1375 to 1450, certain Europeans started fully mechanized replication of texts and images, based on predecessor “smaller” technologies. What they started became the most powerful means for the distribution, storage, and retrieval of knowledge in history, up until the invention of digital means. We have scant information about the initiation of print technologies in the period up to Gutenberg, and the picture (...)
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  22. The Relation-Theory of Mental Acts: Durand of St.-Pourcain on the Ontological Status of Mental Acts.Peter Hartman - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 7 (1).
    The relation-theory of mental acts proposes that a mental act is a kind of relative entity founded upon the mind and directed at the object of perception or thought. While most medieval philosophers recognized that there is something importantly relational about thought, they nevertheless rejected the view that mental acts are wholly relations. Rather, the dominant view was that a mental act is either in whole or part an Aristotelian quality added to the mind upon which such a relation to (...)
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  23. What is in the Mirror? The Metaphysics of Mirror Images in Albert the Great and Peter Auriol.Lukas Licka - 2019 - In Brian Glenney & José Silva (eds.), The Senses and the History of Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 131-148.
  24. Pohled šlehající z očí: františkáni 13. století a Augustinova autorita v otázce extramisní teorie vidění.Lukas Licka - 2019 - In Petr Hlaváček (ed.), Proměny františkánské tradice: Od teologie a filosofie ke kultuře a umění. Praha: FF UK – Filosofia. pp. 68–92.
    [Sight Darting Forth from the Eyes: 13th-Century Franciscans and Augustine’s Authority in the Issue of Extramissionist Theory of Vision] One of the positions sometimes ascribed to Augustine is the so-called extramissionist conception of vision, i.e. the assumption that the sight is effectuated by something being sent out from the eyes, as opposed to more intuitive receptionist understanding of sight. The paper investigates the attitudes of eleven 13th-century Franciscan thinkers (from Alexander of Hales and John of La Rochelle in 1230s to (...)
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  25. Relational Intentionality. Brentano and the Aristotelian Tradition, by Hamid Taieb. [REVIEW]Andrea Marchesi - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (5):1062-1066.
  26. Singular Intellection in Medieval Commentaries on Aristotle’s De Anima.Ana María Mora-Márquez - 2019 - Vivarium 57 (3-4):293-316.
    Discussions about singular cognition, and its linguistic counterpart, are by no means exclusive to contemporary philosophy. In fact, a strikingly similar discussion, to which several medieval texts bear witness, took place in the late Middle Ages. The aim of this article is to partly reconstruct this medieval discussion, as it took place in Parisian question-commentaries on Aristotle’s De anima, so as to show the progression from the rejection of singular intellection in Siger of Brabant to the descriptivist positions of John (...)
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  27. Eine Person sein. Philosophische Debatten im Spätmittelalter.Dominik Perler - 2019 - Frankfurt a.M.: Klostermann.
    Was ist eine menschliche Person? Durch welche besonderen Eigenschaften zeichnet sie sich aus? Und wodurch unterscheidet sie sich von einem blossen Lebewesen? Mittelalterliche Autoren widmeten sich mit viel Scharfsinn diesen Fragen, indem sie sich auf drei Dimensionen einer Person konzentrierten. Sie setzten bei der metaphysischen Dimension an, indem sie eine Person als eine individuelle Substanz mit einer rationalen Natur bestimmten. Dies fuhrte sie dazu, diese Substanz genauer zu untersuchen: ihre wesentlichen Bestandteile, ihre Einheit und ihre Identitat uber die Zeit hinweg. (...)
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  28. Anti-Exceptionalism About Logic.Stephen Read - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Logic 16 (7):298.
    Anti-exceptionalism about logic is the doctrine that logic does not require its own epistemology, for its methods are continuous with those of science. Although most recently urged by Williamson, the idea goes back at least to Lakatos, who wanted to adapt Popper's falsicationism and extend it not only to mathematics but to logic as well. But one needs to be careful here to distinguish the empirical from the a posteriori. Lakatos coined the term 'quasi-empirical' `for the counterinstances to putative mathematical (...)
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  29. Walter Chatton on Future Contingents: Between Formalism and Ontology, Written by Jon Bornholdt. [REVIEW]Mark Thakkar - 2019 - Vivarium 57 (1-2):210-221.
    This light revision of Bornholdt's doctoral thesis (Würzburg, 2015) is effectively a medievally-oriented follow-up to Richard Gaskin’s 'The Sea Battle and the Master Argument' (1995). The book is stimulating from a philosophical point of view, but the exegesis is disappointingly unreliable.
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  30. Van Dyke: Medieval Philosophy, 4-Vol. Set.Christina Van Dyke & Andrew Arlig (eds.) - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    The Middle Ages saw a great flourishing of philosophy. Now, to help students and researchers make sense of the gargantuan—and, often, dauntingly complex—body of literature on the main traditions of thinking that stem from the Greek heritage of late antiquity, this new four-volume collection is the latest addition to Routledge’s acclaimed Critical Concepts in Philosophy series. Christina Van Dyke of Calvin College, USA, and an editor of the Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy, has carefully assembled classic contributions, as well as (...)
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  31. Persons in Patristic and Medieval Christian Theology.Scott M. Williams - 2019 - In Antonia LoLordo (ed.), Persons: A History. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: -/- It is likely that Boethius (480-524ce) inaugurates, in Latin Christian theology, the consideration of personhood as such. In the Treatise Against Eutyches and Nestorius Boethius gives a well-known definition of personhood according to genus and difference(s): a person is an individual substance of a rational nature. Personhood is predicated only of individual rational substances. This chapter situates Boethius in relation to significant Christian theologians before and after him, and the way in which his definition of personhood is a (...)
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  32. Embodied Vs. Non-Embodied Modes of Knowing in Aquinas.Therese Scarpelli Cory - 2018 - Faith and Philosophy 35 (4):417-446.
    What does it mean to be an embodied thinker of abstract concepts? Does embodiment shape the character and quality of our understanding of universals such as “dog” and “beauty,” and would a non-embodied mind understand such concepts differently? I examine these questions through the lens of Thomas Aquinas’s remarks on the differences between embodied intellects and non-embodied intellects. In Aquinas, I argue, the difference between embodied and non-embodied intellection of extramental realities is rooted in the fact that embodied and non-embodied (...)
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  33. The First Movements of the Sensitive Appetite: Aquinas in Context.Matthew Dugandzic - 2018 - New Blackfriars 99 (1083):638-652.
    In the De malo, Thomas Aquinas claims that the first movements (primi motus) of the sensitive appetite are sinful. This seems surprising, since these movements do not appear to be under the control of reason. Unfortunately, the brevity of Aquinas’s discussion makes it difficult to understand why he would make such a claim. However, if he is read in light of the medieval debate about the first movements that was ongoing during his time, then Aquinas’s reasoning becomes much clearer. This (...)
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  34. Boethius of Dacia on the Differentia and the Unity of Definitions.Rodrigo Guerizoli - 2018 - In Gyula Klima & Alex Hall (eds.), Hylomorphism and Mereology: Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics Volume 15. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 53-66.
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  35. Dangerous Mystic: Meister Eckhart’s Path to the God Within.Joel F. Harrington - 2018 - New York, USA: Penguin Press.
    Meister Eckhart was a medieval Christian mystic whose wisdom powerfully appeals to seekers seven centuries after his death. In the modern era, Eckhart’s writings have struck a chord with thinkers as diverse as Heidegger, Merton, Sartre, John Paul II, and the current Dalai Lama. He is the inspiration for the bestselling New Age author Eckhart Tolle’s pen name, and his fourteenth-century quotes have become an online sensation. Today a variety of Christians, as well as many Zen Buddhists, Sufi Muslims, Jewish (...)
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  36. Are Cognitive Habits in the Intellect? Durand of St.-Pourçain and Prosper de Reggio Emilia on Cognitive Habits.Peter Hartman - 2018 - In Magali E. Roques & Nicolas Faucher (eds.), The Ontology, Psychology, and Axiology of Habits (Habitus) in the Medieval Philosophy. pp. 229-244.
    Once Socrates has thought something, he comes to acquire an item such that he is then able to think such thoughts again when he wants, and he can, all other things being equal, do this with more ease than he could before. This item that he comes to acquire medieval philosophers called a cognitive habit which most medieval philosophers maintained was a new quality added to Socrates' intellect. However, some disagreed. In this paper, I will examine an interesting alternative theory (...)
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  37. Carla Casagrande e Gianfranco Fioravanti (a cura di), "La filosofia in Italia al tempo di Dante", Bologna 2017. [REVIEW]Roberto Limonta - 2018 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia: Nuova Serie 1:207-211.
    The aim of the essays of this book is to explain the situation of the philosophical studies, in Italy, during the first half of the XIV century, that is the Dante's years.
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  38. Simon of Faversham.Ana Maria Mora-Marquez - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  39. Radulphus Brito.Ana Maria Mora-Marquez & Iacopo Costa - 2018 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  40. Uma nota sobre uma teoria medieval acerca de inexistentes.Ernesto Perini-Santos - 2018 - Ética E Filosofia Política 3:109-128.
    Algumas soluções medievais para o sofisma ´omnis homo de necessitate est animal´ postulam um tipo especial de ser, o ser da essência (esse essentiae), que explica como uma predicação necessária pode ser verdadeira sobre seres cuja existência é contingente. O ser da essência, distinto do ser efetivo (esse actuale), admite apenas propriedades necessárias. Deste traço se seguem duas diferenças em relação a teorias meinonguianas acerca do não ser. Inicialmente, segundo Meinong, o tipo de propriedade de um objeto é independente de (...)
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  41. The Structure of the Virtues : A Study of Thomas Aquinas’s and Godfrey of Fontaines's Accounts of Moral Goodness.Alexander Stöpfgeshoff - 2018 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    This dissertation is a study of Thomas Aquinas’s and Godfrey of Fontaines’s moral philosophies. In this study, I conduct a detailed analysis of two Aristotelian commitments concerning the character virtues, namely, The Plurality of the Character Virtues and The Connection of the Character Virtues. Both Aquinas and Godfrey think that there are many distinct character virtues, however, one cannot possess these character virtues in separation from each other. In Chapter I, it is established that Aquinas believes in the plurality of (...)
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  42. What is Cognition? Peter Auriol’s Account.Hamid Taieb - 2018 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 85 (1):109-134.
    My paper aims at presenting Peter Auriol’s theory of cognition. Auriol holds that cognition is “something which makes an object appear to someone.” This claim, for Auriol, is meant to be indeterminate, as he explicitly says that the “something” in question can refer to any type of being. However, when he states how cognition is “implemented” in cognizers, Auriol specifies what this “something” is: for God, it is simply the deity itself; for creatures, cognition is described as something “absolute,” i.e. (...)
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  43. La noción de persona en san Alberto Magno.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2018 - In Víctor M. Tirado (ed.), Jornada de filosofía 2015. La persona. Madrid: Ediciones Universidad San Dámaso. pp. 163-190.
    A little essay on the notion of person in Albert the Great. He bases on Alexander of Hales and develops his notion of person from the classical definition of Boethius.
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  44. Albert the Great on the Eucharist as True Food.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2018 - Annales Theologici 32:141-152.
    Christian theology on the Eucharist, already since the Gospel of John refers to the scarcity and abundance of food, by linking this Sacrament to the hunger suffered by the Israelites in the desert and their further satiation with manna from heaven. Saint Albert the Great, in his reflection on the Eucharist, includes several ideas taken from his scientific knowledge, especially from Aristotle. These considerations build one of his personal contributions to theological understanding of the spiritualis manducatio that takes place in (...)
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  45. Marsilius of Inghen on Incipit and Desinit in Consequentiae II, Chapters 4-5.Graziana Ciola - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):170-198.
    In this paper, the author offers an introduction to Marsilius of Inghen’s treatment of expositiones of sentences de incipit and de desinit in his treatise on Consequentiae, with an analysis of the various modi exponendi presented by Marsilius and an edition of the text. The author argues that, in the split between physical and logical approaches to the issues arising in analyses of incipit and desinit, Marsilius’ theory presents some hybrid features, but tends towards the logical end of the spectrum.
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  46. Pietro di Giovanni Olivi Frate Minore.O. F. M. David Flood - 2017 - Franciscan Studies 75:533-536.
    The October 2016 publication of the 2015 convegno on Peter of John Olivi begins with a fine survey of Provence and Languedoc in Olivi's time. J. Chiffoleau, with C. Lenoble, supplies the reader with much detail and some summary, along with abundant reference, on Olivi's home turf. In the come and go of life religious and lay, Olivi saw to critical support for business while trying to stabilize Franciscan life. He did very well by both. Chiffoleau finishes his pages on (...)
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  47. Pietro di Giovanni Olivi Frate Minore.Flood David - 2017 - Franciscan Studies 75:533-536.
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  48. Giovanni of Capestrano on the Plague and the Doctors.Ottó Gecser - 2017 - Franciscan Studies 75:27-47.
    In her authoritative collection of contemporary sources on the Black Death, Rosemary Horrox subdivided the part dedicated to 'explanations and responses' in three sections: 'The religious response', 'Scientific explanation', and 'Human agency'.2 Even if there are overlaps between these categories, they offer explicit or implicit explanations of pestilence and suggest adequate responses to it in different terms. Documents in the first are centered on God's anger and punishment for human sins, those in the second on natural mechanisms not immediately dependent (...)
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  49. The Closure Principle for Signification.Miroslav Hanke - 2017 - Studia Neoaristotelica 14 (1):59-84.
    The Bradwardine-Read multiple-meanings solution to paradoxes invented in 1320s and formally reconstructed and developed in 2000s is based on the so-called “closure principle for signification”, in particular, for sentential meaning. According to this principle, sentences are assumed to signify whatever they imply. As a consequence, paradoxical sentences are proved to signify their own truth and thereby are reduced to simply false self-contradictions. One of the problems of this solution to paradoxes is that the closure principle over-generates if sentences are closed (...)
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  50. The Divine Name of Wisdom in the Dionysian Commentary Tradition.Michael Harrington - 2017 - Dionysius 35:105-133.
1 — 50 / 1572