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1443 found
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  1. Swyneshed, Paradox and the Rule of Contradictory Pairs.Stephen Read - manuscript
    Roger Swyneshed, in his treatise on insolubles (logical paradoxes), dating from the early 1330s, drew three notorious corollaries of his solution. The third states that there is a contradictory pair of propositions both of which are false. This appears to contradict the Rule of Contradictory Pairs, which requires that in every such pair, one must be true and the other false. Looking back at Aristotle's treatise De Interpretatione, we find that Aristotle himself, immediately after defining the notion of a contradictory (...)
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  2. Via antiqua vs. via moderna semantics: Two ways of constructing semantic theory.Gyula Klima - manuscript
    1st GPMR Workshop on Logic and Semantics: Medieval Logic and Modern Applied Logic, Reinische Friedrich Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Germany, 2007.
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  3. Twelfth asian logic conference.Rod Downey - forthcoming - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic.
  4. N. Germann and S. Harvey editors. The Origin and Nature of Language and Logic: Perspectives in Medieval Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Thought, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020, xiii + 422 pp. €71,46, ISBN 978-2503588926. [REVIEW]W. Hodges - forthcoming - History and Philosophy of Logic:1-4.
    N. Germann and S. Harvey, editors. The Origin and Nature of Language and Logic: Perspectives in Medieval Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Thought. Turnhout: Brepols, 2020. xiii +422 pp. €71,46, ISBN...
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  5. Kilwardby's 55th Lesson.Wolfgang Lenzen - forthcoming - Logic and Logical Philosophy:1.
    In “Lectio 55” of his Notule libri Priorum, Robert Kilwardby discussed various objections that had been raised against Aristotle’s Theses. The first thesis, AT1, says that no proposition q is implied both by a proposition p and by its negation, ∼p. AT2 says that no proposition p is implied by its own negation. In Prior Analytics, Aristotle had shown that AT2 entails AT1, and he argued that the assumption of a proposition p such that (∼p → p) would be “absurd”. (...)
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  6. The Modal Logic of John Fabri of Valenciennes (c. 1500). A Study in Token-Based Semantics. [REVIEW]Ana María Mora-Márquez - forthcoming - History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
  7. The Real Distinction between Supposit and Nature in Angels in Thomas Aquinas.Elliot Polsky - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
    It is universally acknowledged that, for St. Thomas, there is a distinction between human persons or supposits and their natures or essences. But it is usually thought that there is no parallel distinction between the angelic person or supposit and its nature. Yet, as this paper argues, Aquinas consistently puts forward just such a distinction. This paper surveys Aquinas’s arguments for the unique identity of God with his essence and the corresponding distinctions between created persons and their essences, showing in (...)
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  8. A Hegelian among germanists-the medieval studies of Rosenkranz, Karl.U. Rautenberg - forthcoming - Hegel-Studien.
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  9. John Buridan on Logical Consequence.Boaz Faraday Schuman - forthcoming - In Graziana Ciola & Milo Crimi (eds.), Validity Throughout History. Munich: Philosophia Verlag.
    If an argument is valid, it is impossible for its premises to be true, and its conclusion false. But how should we understand these notions of truth and impossibility? Here, I present the answers given by John Buridan (ca. 1300-60), showing (i) how he understands truth in his anti-realist metaphysics, and (ii) how he understands modality in connection with causal powers. In short: if an argument exists and is valid, there does not exist a power capable of making the premises (...)
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  10. Varieties of Necessity in John Buridan : Logic and Natural Philosophy in the Late Middle Ages.Guido Alt - 2023 - Dissertation, Stockholm University
    This dissertation is a study of John Buridan's (c.1300-c.1361) conception of modalities. Modal concepts - concepts of necessity, possibility, impossibility, and contingency - describe the ways in which things could and could not be otherwise. These concepts became notoriously central for philosophical discourse in the late Middle Ages. In recent years, Buridan's philosophy and modal theory have received sophisticated scholarly attention. The main contribution of the dissertation is to show new ways in which Buridan's modal theory is embedded in its (...)
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  11. The Semantic Account of Formal Consequence, from Alfred Tarski Back to John Buridan.Jacob Archambault - 2023 - In Joshua P. Hochschild, Turner C. Nevitt, Adam Wood & Gábor Borbély (eds.), Metaphysics Through Semantics: The Philosophical Recovery of the Medieval Mind / Essays in Honor of Gyula Klima. Springer Verlag. pp. 255-272.
    The resemblance of the theory of formal consequence first offered by the fourteenth-century logician John Buridan to that later offered by Alfred Tarski has long been remarked upon. But it has not yet been subjected to sustained analysis. In this paper, I provide just such an analysis. I begin by reviewing today’s classical understanding of formal consequence, then highlighting its differences from Tarski’s 1936 account. Following this, I introduce Buridan’s account, detailing its philosophical underpinnings, then its content. This then allows (...)
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  12. In Appreciation of Gyula Klima.Joshua P. Hochschild - 2023 - In Metaphysics Through Semantics: The Philosophical Recovery of the Medieval Mind. Springer.
    To help frame the Festschrift for Gyula Klima (Metaphysics Through Semantics: The Philosophical Recovery of the Medieval Mind), this appreciation offers perspective on the scholar's person and project. Drawing on biographical details and reflecting on signal contributions, it seeks to honor a distinguished philosopher who deserves to be celebrated by friends and introduced to a new generation of readers. Download with frontmatter from: link[dot]springer[dot]com/content/pdf/bfm:978-3-031-15026-5/1?pdf=chapter%20toc.
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  13. Metaphysics Through Semantics: The Philosophical Recovery of the Medieval Mind / Essays in Honor of Gyula Klima.Joshua P. Hochschild, Turner C. Nevitt, Adam Wood & Gábor Borbély (eds.) - 2023 - Springer Verlag.
    Gyula Klima’s distinctive work recovering medieval philosophy has inspired a generation of scholars. Klima’s attention to the distinctive terms, problems, and assumptions that constitute alternative historical conceptual frameworks has informed work in philosophy of language and logic, cognition and philosophical psychology, and metaphysics and theology. This volume celebrates Klima’s project by collecting new essays by colleagues, collaborators, and former students. Covering a wide range of thinkers (Plotinus, Anselm, Aquinas, Buridan, Ockham, and others) and various specifc questions (e.g., about language, cognition, (...)
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  14. Valid Arguments as True Conditionals.Andrea Iacona - 2023 - Mind 132 (526):428-451.
    This paper explores an idea of Stoic descent that is largely neglected nowadays, the idea that an argument is valid when the conditional formed by the conjunction of its premises as antecedent and its conclusion as consequent is true. As it will be argued, once some basic features of our naıve understanding of validity are properly spelled out, and a suitable account of conditionals is adopted, the equivalence between valid arguments and true conditionals makes perfect sense. The account of validity (...)
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  15. What can anyone say so far on the Peirce-CJC relation?Robert Junqueira - 2023 - Divyadaan: Journal of Philosophy and Education 34 (2):191-222.
    Charles S. Peirce (†1914) is often referred to as the founder of contemporary semiotics. Peirce provided the community of inquiry with a very convincing explanation of what a sign is. Peirce's definition of the sign bears a striking resemblance to that proposed in the 1606 volume of the CJC, the Coimbra Jesuit Course, authored by Sebastião do Couto (†1639). The community of inquiry holds the belief that Peirce drew from the writings of Couto to arrive at his triadic conception of (...)
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  16. Medieval Philosophy Redefined in a Nutshell.Robert Junqueira - 2023 - Divyadaan: Journal of Philosophy and Education 34 (3):367-376.
    Deely's chief orientation, in his Medieval Philosophy field days, was to frame the field's thematic concern in light of the gestation of semiotic awareness. He argued that semiotic awareness was expressed fully for the first time in history by Poinsot, although he said that the process of gestation only resulted in a community-binding Way after the arrival of the Semiotics of Peirce. Between Poinsot and Peirce, a period of darkness preceded a full dawn. In this paper, we provide an introductory (...)
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  17. Peirce and the Coimbra Jesuit Course: A Bond Far More Pervasive Than Commonly Believed.Robert Junqueira - 2023 - Phicare (Philosophy and Care Repository).
    This paper has been presented at the Charles S. Peirce Society’s 10-Minute Thesis Initiative: “His Glassy Essence in Relation” on February 18, 2023, where papers were also presented by Professor Doctor António Manuel Martins and Professor Doctor Mohammad Shafiei, respectively affiliated to the Coimbra Institute for Philosophical Studies and Shahid Beheshti University. -/- The edition “His Glassy Essence in Relation” of the Charles S. Peirce Society’s 10-Minute Thesis Initiative has been jointly organized by Aaron Wilson, António Manuel Martins, Mohammad Shafiei, (...)
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  18. Omnis Propositio Est Affirmativa; Ergo, Nulla Propositio Est Negativa (and the Paradox of Validity).Dahlquist Manuel - 2023 - In Theories of Paradox in the Middle Ages. LONDON: College Publication. pp. 100-129.
    In the first of the Insolubles in Chapter 8 of his Sophismata, Buridan contends that the inference Omnis propositio est affirmativa; ergo, nulla propositio est negativa (PS) is valid, even though it appeals to the self-reference in the conclusion to show that what we (following Read 2001) call the classical conception of validity (CCV) fails. This requires that we accept that there are good inferences in which a false conclusion follows from true premises. Partially following Hughes’ proposal (1982), we argue (...)
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  19. Late scholastic probable arguments and their contrast with rhetorical and demonstrative arguments.James Franklin - 2022 - Philosophical Inquiries 10 (2).
    Aristotle divided arguments that persuade into the rhetorical (which happen to persuade), the dialectical (which are strong so ought to persuade to some degree) and the demonstrative (which must persuade if rightly understood). Dialectical arguments were long neglected, partly because Aristotle did not write a book about them. But in the sixteenth and seventeenth century late scholastic authors such as Medina, Cano and Soto developed a sound theory of probable arguments, those that have logical and not merely psychological force but (...)
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  20. Secundum Quid and the Pragmatics of Arguments. The Challenges of the Dialectical Tradition.Fabrizio Macagno - 2022 - Argumentation 36 (3):317-343.
    The phrase _secundum quid et simpliciter_ is the Latin expression translating and labelling the sophism described by Aristotle as connected with the use of some particular expression “absolutely or in a certain respect and not in its proper sense.” This paper presents an overview of the analysis of this fallacy in the history of dialectics, reconstructing the different explanations provided in the Aristotelian texts, the Latin and medieval dialectical tradition, and the modern logical approaches. The _secundum quid_ emerges as a (...)
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  21. Tarjumah, tauẓīḥāt va talk̲h̲īṣ al-Manṭiq al-Muẓaffar, maʻ matan.Muḥammad Riḍā Muẓaffar - 2022 - Islāmʹābād: Bāqirulʻulūm Fāʼūnḍeshan. Edited by Muḥammad Ḥasnain Nādir.
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  22. ‘Everything True Will Be False’: Paul of Venice and a Medieval Yablo Paradox.Stephen Read - 2022 - History and Philosophy of Logic 43 (4):332-346.
    In his Quadratura, Paul of Venice considers a sophism involving time and tense which appears to show that there is a valid inference which is also invalid. Consider this inference concerning some proposition A : A will signify only that everything true will be false, so A will be false. Call this inference B. A and B are the basis of an insoluble-that is, a Liar-like paradox. Like the sequence of statements in Yablo's paradox, B looks ahead to a moment (...)
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  23. Multiple Generality in Scholastic Logic.Boaz Faraday Schuman - 2022 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 10:215-282.
    Multiple generality has long been known to cause confusion. For example, “Everyone has a donkey that is running” has two readings: either (i) there is a donkey, owned by everyone, and it is running; or (ii) everyone owns some donkey or other, and all such donkeys run. Medieval logicians were acutely aware of such ambiguities, and the logical problems they pose, and sought to sort them out. One of the most ambitious undertakings in this regard is a pair of massive (...)
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  24. The Consistency of a Certain Medieval-Like Solution to the Liar Paradox. Proof Given by Bolesław Sobociński.Kordula Świętorzecka - 2022 - History and Philosophy of Logic 43 (3):275-283.
    In Formale Logik, published in 1956, J. M. Bocheński presented his first proposal for the solution to the liar paradox, which he related to Paul of Venice's argumentation from Logica Magna. A formalized version of this solution was then presented in Formalisierung einer scholastischen Lösung der Paradoxie des ‘Lügners’ in 1959. The historical references of the resulting formalism turn out to be closer to Albert de Saxon's argument and the later solution by John Buridan. Bocheński did not pose the question (...)
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  25. Time and Indexicality in Buridan’s Concept of Logical Consequence.Manuel A. Dahlquist - 2021 - History and Philosophy of Logic 42 (4):374-397.
    Jean Buridan developed his theory of consequence within a semantical framework compatible with what we now call token-based semantics. In his Treatise on Consequences and Sophismata, Buridan showed...
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  26. Mixed Conditional-Categorical Syllogisms from Avicenna to Urmawī.Khaled El-Rouayheb - 2021 - History and Philosophy of Logic 43 (3):232-250.
    A number of medieval Arabic logicians discussed inferences that combine the principles of propositional and term logic, for example: Whenever H is Z then Every J is DNo D is AWhenever H is Z then S...
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  27. History of Rational Philosophy among the Arabs and Turks.Mehmet Karabela - 2021 - In Islamic Thought Through Protestant Eyes. New York: Routledge. pp. 181-194.
    In his disputatio, Johann Peter von Ludewig provides a history of rational philosophy among the Arabs and sets out to contextualize the Turks’ attitude to it. Like many Lutheran scholars of the time, Ludewig believed that Islam, as a religion, impeded the development of rational philosophy in the Arab world. However, unlike those philosophers, he examines external influences that may have fed the interest of Arab Muslims in rational philosophy, especially dialectic. Unlike Orthodox Lutherans, such as Pfeiffer and Kromayer, in (...)
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  28. History of Arabic Logic.Mehmet Karabela - 2021 - In Islamic Thought Through Protestant Eyes. New York: Routledge. pp. 224-235.
    Johannes Steuchius’ disputatio uses Arabic logic to present an historical account of the development of philosophical thought in Arabia before and after the emergence of Islam. Steuchius first proposes that philosophy drew its origins from the East. His evidence for this claim is that many of the Greek philosophers, considered the forefathers of European philosophy, began cultivating their philosophical thinking as a result of exposure to ancient Eastern philosophy. After the introduction of Greek philosophy, it is agreed that dialectic was (...)
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  29. Regensburg Colloquy of 1601: Its Disputation Method and the German Second Scholastic Disputation Handbooks.Lukáš Kotala - 2021 - History and Philosophy of Logic 43 (1):1-50.
    The article deals with the Lutheran–Catholic religious colloquy at Regensburg of 1601. It points out that the event was of importance not only for political and religious reasons but also in terms...
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  30. Thirteenth-Century Aristotelian Logic: The Study of Scientific Method.Ana Maria Mora-Marquez - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 9:146-185.
  31. COVID 19 PANDEMIC AND THE QUESTION OF DIVINE PROVIDENCE IN A DIGITALIZED AGE.Justin Nnaemeka Onyeukaziri - 2021 - In Digitalization of society and the future of Christianity. On the issue of transformation of the value-normative system of the society. Moscow, Russia: pp. 176-192.
    This paper attempts to bring the traditional theodicy on the question of evil and the Divine Providence, to its logical conclusion, in such a way that a believer is challenged to totally accept the implication of his or her faith in God. To have faith is to completely surrender to Divine Providence. It is to completely surrender ones free will to the rational conclusions or consequences of faith in the Divine Providence. Hence, this paper is for those who are perplexed (...)
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  32. al-Muʻīnāt fī Manṭiq al-Shaykh al-Muẓaffar: shurūḥāt, iḍāʼāt, rusūm bayānīyah, kharāʼiṭ dhihnīyah, taṭbīqāt.Aḥmad Samīr Qaṣlah - 2021 - Bayrūt: Dār al-Maʻārif al-Ḥikmīyah. Edited by Riḍā Fayṣal Sukruwah.
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  33. Modality and Validity in the Logic of John Buridan.Boaz Faraday Schuman - 2021 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    What makes a valid argument valid? Generally speaking, in a valid argument, if the premisses are true, then the conclusion must necessarily also be true. But on its own, this doesn’t tell us all that much. What is truth? And what is necessity? In what follows, I consider answers to these questions proposed by the fourteenth century logician John Buridan († ca. 1358). My central claim is that Buridan’s logic is downstream from his metaphysics. Accordingly, I treat his metaphysical discussions (...)
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  34. Brentano and the Medieval Distinction Between First and Second Intentions.Hamid Taieb - 2021 - Topoi 41 (1):143-158.
    Brentano’s account of intentionality has often been traced back to its scholastic sources. This is justified by his claim that objects of thought have a specific mode of being—namely, “intentional inexistence” —and that mental acts have an “intentional relation” to these objects. These technical terms in Brentano do indeed recall the medieval notions of esse intentionale, which is a mode of being, and of intentio, which is a “tending towards” of mental acts. However, within the lexical family of intentio there (...)
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  35. Essere e causalità: ontologia tomista.Pasquale Viola - 2021 - Dissertation,
    L'elaborato intende analizzare lo statuto ontologico dell'ente a partire dal binomio esse e id quod est, sviluppato da Tommaso nel commento al De Hebdomadibus di Boezio, specificando i concetti di partecipazione come causalità forte, e di essere come massimo estensivo e più generale.
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  36. Abharī’s Solution to the Liar Paradox: A Logical Analysis.Mohammad Saleh Zarepour - 2021 - History and Philosophy of Logic 42 (1):1-16.
    The medieval Islamic solutions to the liar paradox can be categorized into three different families. According to the solutions of the first family, the liar sentences are not well-formed truth-apt sentences. The solutions of the second family are based on a violation of the classical principles of logic (e.g. the principle of non-contradiction). Finally, the solutions of the third family render the liar sentences as simply false without any contradiction. In the Islamic tradition, almost all the well-known solutions of the (...)
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  37. al-Sullam.ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad al-Akhḍarī - 2020 - In Māhir Muḥammad ʻAdnān ʻUthmān, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad Akhḍarī, Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim Damanhūrī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Wallālī, QuwaysinīḤasan ibn al-Darwīsh, Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak Sijilmāsī, Saʻīd ibn Ibrāhīm Qaddūrah & Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar Darawī (eds.), Majmūʻ al-Sullam al-murawnaq: wa-yashtamilu ʻalá sabʻat kutub. Dār Taḥqīq al-Kitāb lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzīʻ.
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  38. Īḍāḥ al-mubham min maʻānī al-Sullam.Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim al-Damanhūrī - 2020 - In Māhir Muḥammad ʻAdnān ʻUthmān, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad Akhḍarī, Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim Damanhūrī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Wallālī, QuwaysinīḤasan ibn al-Darwīsh, Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak Sijilmāsī, Saʻīd ibn Ibrāhīm Qaddūrah & Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar Darawī (eds.), Majmūʻ al-Sullam al-murawnaq: wa-yashtamilu ʻalá sabʻat kutub. Dār Taḥqīq al-Kitāb lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzīʻ.
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  39. Taqrīrāt.Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar al-Darawī - 2020 - In Māhir Muḥammad ʻAdnān ʻUthmān, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad Akhḍarī, Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim Damanhūrī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Wallālī, QuwaysinīḤasan ibn al-Darwīsh, Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak Sijilmāsī, Saʻīd ibn Ibrāhīm Qaddūrah & Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar Darawī (eds.), Majmūʻ al-Sullam al-murawnaq: wa-yashtamilu ʻalá sabʻat kutub. Dār Taḥqīq al-Kitāb lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzīʻ.
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  40. Sharḥ al-Sullam al-munawraq.Ḥasan ibn al-Darwīsh al-Quwaysinī - 2020 - In Māhir Muḥammad ʻAdnān ʻUthmān, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad Akhḍarī, Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim Damanhūrī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Wallālī, QuwaysinīḤasan ibn al-Darwīsh, Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak Sijilmāsī, Saʻīd ibn Ibrāhīm Qaddūrah & Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar Darawī (eds.), Majmūʻ al-Sullam al-murawnaq: wa-yashtamilu ʻalá sabʻat kutub. Dār Taḥqīq al-Kitāb lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzīʻ.
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  41. Taqyīdāt.Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak al-Sijilmāsī - 2020 - In Māhir Muḥammad ʻAdnān ʻUthmān, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad Akhḍarī, Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim Damanhūrī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Wallālī, QuwaysinīḤasan ibn al-Darwīsh, Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak Sijilmāsī, Saʻīd ibn Ibrāhīm Qaddūrah & Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar Darawī (eds.), Majmūʻ al-Sullam al-murawnaq: wa-yashtamilu ʻalá sabʻat kutub. Dār Taḥqīq al-Kitāb lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzīʻ.
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  42. Qawl al-musallam fī taḥqīq maʻānī al-Sullam.Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad al-Wallālī - 2020 - In Māhir Muḥammad ʻAdnān ʻUthmān, ʻAbd al-Raḥmān ibn Muḥammad Akhḍarī, Aḥmad ibn ʻAbd al-Munʻim Damanhūrī, Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad Wallālī, QuwaysinīḤasan ibn al-Darwīsh, Aḥmad ibn al-Mubārak Sijilmāsī, Saʻīd ibn Ibrāhīm Qaddūrah & Khaṭṭāb ʻUmar Darawī (eds.), Majmūʻ al-Sullam al-murawnaq: wa-yashtamilu ʻalá sabʻat kutub. Dār Taḥqīq al-Kitāb lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr wa-al-Tawzīʻ.
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  43. Sharḥ Sullam al-Akhḍarī fī ʻilm al-manṭiq.Bin Alummā & Muḥammad Sālim bin Attāh - 2020 - Anwākshūṭ: Dār Jusūr ʻAbd al-ʻAzīz.
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  44. The Logic of the Trinity and the Filioque Question in Thomas Aquinas: A Formal Approach.Fábio Bertato - 2020 - In R. S. Silvestre (ed.), Beyond Faith and Rationality. Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures, vol 34. Springer, Cham. Chama, Switzerland: pp. 137-151.
  45. Hic sunt chimaerae? On Absolutely Impossible Significates and Referents in Mid-14th-Century Nominalist Logic.Graziana S. Ciola - 2020 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 87 (2):441-467.
    Marsilius of Inghen’s account of imaginable impossibilities became paradigmatic in logic, semantics, and metaphysics throughout the later Middle Ages and well into the early modern period. The present study focuses on imaginable impossibilities in 14th-century logic, underlining the relevance of Marsilius of Inghen’s innovative approach through a comparison with the semantic accounts proposed by other mid-14th-century Parisian nominalists, namely John Buridan and Albert of Saxony. In particular, this paper tracks the specific issue of the admissibility of absolute impossibilities – such (...)
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  46. The logical relation of consequence.Basil Evangelidis - 2020 - Humanities Bulletin 3 (2):77-90.
    The present endeavour aims at the clarification of the concept of the logical consequence. Initially we investigate the question: How was the concept of logical consequence discovered by the medieval philosophers? Which ancient philosophical foundations were necessary for the discovery of the logical relation of consequence and which explicit medieval contributions, such as the notion of the formality (formal validity), led to its discovery. Secondly we discuss which developments of modern philosophy effected the turn from the medieval concept of logical (...)
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  47. Introduction to ‘Studies in Post-Medieval Logic’.Christophe Geudens & Steven Coesemans - 2020 - History and Philosophy of Logic 41 (4):305-308.
    This special issue contains three papers on evolutions in logic during the so-called ‘post-medieval’ period. The papers discuss the following topics: traditions of...
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  48. Introduction to ‘Studies in Post-Medieval Logic’.Christophe Geudens & Steven Coesemans - 2020 - History and Philosophy of Logic 41 (4):305-308.
    This special issue contains three papers on evolutions in logic during the so-called ‘post-medieval’ period (roughly the years 1450–1700). The papers discuss the following topics: (1) traditions of logic in the British Isles during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; (2) approaches to validity in medieval and post-medieval logic; and (3) scholastic and humanist interpretations of the prologue to Galen’s Art of Medicine. All papers provide an original contribution to research on post-medieval logic, which to date is still in the early (...)
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  49. Between Imagination and Gambling. The Forms of Validity in Scholastic Logic.Miroslav Hanke - 2020 - History and Philosophy of Logic 41 (4):331-351.
    1. This paper addresses the development of mutual relations between two sets of ideas in scholastic logic. First, consider the following statements: (1) It is impossible to encounter a chimera.(2)...
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  50. Thomas Aquinas, Magister Ludi: The Relation of Medieval Logic and Theology.Joshua P. Hochschild - 2020 - Hungarian Philosophical Review 64 (4):43-62.
    This paper seeks to articulate the relationship between medieval logic and theology. Reviewing modern scholarship, we find that the purpose of medieval logic, when it is even inquired about, has proven difficult to articulate without reference to theology. This prompts reflection on the metaphors of logic as a “tool” and a “game”: a tool is not merely instrumental, insofar as it can have its own intrinsic goods and can shape and be shaped by that which it serves; likewise a game, (...)
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