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  1. The Old Linguistic Problem of 'Reference' in a Modern Reading of Plato's Sophist.Sepehr Ehsani - manuscript
    This paper is about interpreting the aim of Plato's Sophist in a linguistic framework and arguing that in its attempt at resolving the conundrum of what the true meaning and essence of the word "sophist" could be, it resembles a number of themes encountered in contemporary linguistics. I think it is important to put our findings from the Sophist in a broader Platonic context: in other words, I assume—I think not too unreasonably—that Plato pursued (or at least had in mind) (...)
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  2. Sayre on Plato's Late Ontology.Daryl Pullman - unknown - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 4.
  3. The Refutation of Polus in Plato’s Gorgias Revisited.authorLeibnizstr Georgia Sermamoglou-SoulmaidiCorresponding, Goettingen & GermanyEmail: - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  4. Plato (Ca. 427 - Ca. 347 BC E ): Apology of Socrates.Thomas A. Blackson - forthcoming - In AUTOBIOGRAPHY/AUTOFICTION. An International and Interdisciplinary Handbook. Volume III: Exemplary autobiographical/autofictional texts. Edited by Martina Wagner-Egelhaaf. De Gruyter, Berlin.
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  5. L'enseignement oral de platon. [REVIEW]Luc Brisson - forthcoming - Les Etudes Philosophiques.
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  6. The Myth of Cronus in Plato’s Statesman: Cosmic Rotation and Earthly Correspondence.Wellesley College Corinne GartnerCorresponding authorPhilosophy - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  7. The Principle of Non-Contradiction in Plato’s Republic: An Argument for Form. By Lawrence Bloom.Will Barnes - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):216-220.
  8. The First City and First Soul in Plato’s Republic.Jerry Green - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):50-83.
    One puzzling feature of Plato’s Republic is the First City or ‘city of pigs’. Socrates praises the First City as a “true”, “healthy” city, yet Plato abandons it with little explanation. I argue that the problem is not a political failing, as most previous readings have proposed: the First City is a viable political arrangement, where one can live a deeply Socratic lifestyle. But the First City has a psychological corollary, that the soul is simple rather than tripartite. Plato sees (...)
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  9. The Philosopher’s New Clothes: The Theaetetus, the Academy, and Philosophy’s Turn Against Fashion. By Nickolas Pappas.Gwenda-lin Grewal - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):232-236.
  10. Replenishment and Maintenance of the Human Body.Lea Aurelia Schroeder - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):317-346.
    Scholarship on Plato's Timaeus has paid relatively little attention to Tim. 77a–81, a seemingly disjointed passage on topics including plants, respiration, blood circulation, and musical sounds. Despite this comparative neglect, commentators both ancient and modern have levelled a number of serious charges against Timaeus' remarks in the passage, questioning the coherence and explanatory power of what they take to be a theory of respiration. In this paper, I argue that the project of 77a–81e is not to sketch theories of respiration, (...)
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  11. Saving Diotima’s Account of Erotic Love in Plato’s Symposium.Thomas M. Tuozzo - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):83-104.
  12. As the God Leads.Anna Christensen - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):267-284.
    Disparities between Plato’s Phaedo and Laws have made some scholars question whether the texts can offer a consistent view of suicide. While the Phaedo’s arguments are presented in religious terms, the Laws’ arguments are expressed on legal grounds. Moreover, the Laws appears to endorse more permissive exceptions than the Phaedo does. I argue that the texts present a consistent account, despite initial appearances. Both texts have the same grounds prohibiting suicide, and the Phaedo’s exception is broad enough to include the (...)
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  13. The Ethics of the Circular and the Rectilinear in Plato’s Timaeus.Noam Cohen - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):93-106.
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  14. Returning to the Heavens: Plato’s Socrates on Anaxagoras and Natural Philosophy.Samuel Ortencio Flores - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):123-146.
    Readers of Plato since antiquity have generally taken Socrates’ intellectual autobiography in the Phaedo as a signal of his turn away from the study of natural philosophy. They have turned instead to characters such as Timaeus for evidence of Plato’s pursuit of physics. This article argues that Plato’s Socrates himself developed a philosophy of nature in his criticism of Anaxagoras and his subsequent philosophic pursuits. Socrates’ autobiography places the study of nature in a foundational position within the development of his (...)
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  15. Images and Paradigms in Plato’s Sophist and Statesman.Cristina Ionescu - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):285-306.
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  16. What Socrates Says, and Does Not Say.George Klosko - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):577-591.
    For several decades, scholars of Plato's dialogues have focussed their efforts on understanding Socrates’ philosophy by unravelling the arguments used to establish it. On this view, Socrates’ philosophy is presented in his arguments, and, as Gregory Vlastos says, ‘Almost everything Socrates says is wiry argument; that is the beauty of his talk for a philosopher.’ In this paper I raise questions about what can be learned about Socrates’ philosophy through analysis of his arguments. One critic of what he views as (...)
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  17. Was Plato an Eristic According to Isocrates?Geneviève Lachance - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):81-96.
    The article examines the passages in Isocrates’ Corpus containing a description and a critique of a new type of sophistic called “eristic”. Based on the chronology of Isocrates’ discourses and the description he gave, the author shows that the majority of these passages could not have aimed at Plato as its sole or principal target. However, it should not be excluded that Isocrates’ criticism of eristics was directed against various members of the Socratic circle, a heterogeneous group in which Plato (...)
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  18. The Gatekeeper: Narrative Voice in Plato’s Dialogues, Written by Margalit Finkelberg.Marina Berzins McCoy - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):72-74.
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  19. Promêtheia as Rational Agency in Plato.Christopher Moore - 2020 - Apeiron 54 (1):89-107.
    The Greeks knew a virtue term that represented the ability to determine which norms deserved commitment, a virtue term usually misunderstood as “prediction of likely outcomes” or “being hesitant”: promêtheia. Plato’s uses of this term, almost completely ignored by scholarship, show a sensitivity to the prerequisites for the capacity for rational agency. We must add this virtue term to the usual suspects related to acting as a rational agent: sôphrosunê, dikaiosunê, phrônesis, and sophia. Promêtheia stands out for its importance in (...)
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  20. Readings of Plato’s Apology of Socrates. Defending the Philosophical Life, Edited by Haraldsen, V.V., O. Pettersson, and O.W. Tvedt. [REVIEW]Sophia Stone - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):206-209.
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  21. Rhetoric Beyond Arguments: Thinking About the Role of Fictional Audiences in Plato’s Gorgias.Dora Suarez - 2020 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 41 (2):217-243.
    In this piece, I propose a reading of Plato’s Gorgias that pays special attention to the role that the fictional audience plays in the unfolding of the dialogue. To this end, I use some of the insights that Chaïm Perelman and Lucie Olbrechts–Tyteca conveyed in their seminal work, The New Rhetoric: A Treatise on Argumentation in order to argue that thinking about the way in which Socrates’ arguments are shaped by the different audiences that Gorgias, Polus, and Callicles aim to (...)
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  22. Between Rhetoric and Sophistry: The Puzzling Case of Plato’s Gorgias.Jacqueline Tusi - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (1):59-80.
    The case of Gorgias’ profession has been an object of ongoing dispute among scholars. This is mainly because in some dialogues Plato calls Gorgias a rhetorician, in others a sophist. The purpose of this article is to show that a solution only emerges in the Gorgias, where Plato presents Gorgias’ goals as a rhetorician and its associated arts. On this basis, Plato introduces a systematic division between genuine arts and fake arts, including rhetoric and sophistry, thereby identifying their conceptual differences (...)
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  23. Teleology, Causation and the Atlas Motif in Plato's Phaedo.Daniel Vazquez - 2020 - Schole 14 (1):82-103.
    In this paper, I propose a new reading of Phaedo 99b6-d2. My main thesis is that in 99c6-9, Socrates does not refer to the teleological αἰτία but to the αἰτία that will be provided by a stronger ‘Atlas’ (99c4-5). This means that the passage offers no evidence that Socrates abandons teleology or modifies his views about it. He acknowledges, instead, that he could not find or learn any αἰτία stronger than the teleological one. This, I suggest, allows an interpretation of (...)
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  24. The End of Plato’s Phaedo and the End(s) of Philosophy.Daniel Werner - 2020 - Apeiron 54 (1):29-57.
    The ending of the Phaedo is one of the most powerful and memorable moments in the entire Platonic corpus. It is not simply the end of a single dialogue, but a depiction of the end of the life of the man who is a looming presence in nearly everything that Plato wrote. In this article I offer an in-depth analysis of the final scene of the Phaedo. I argue that Plato very carefully constructs the scene for the sake of specific (...)
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  25. Διακριτικη as a Ποιητικη Τεχνη in the Sophist.Nicolas Zaks - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (1):432-434.
    The διακριτικὴ τέχνη, from which the sixth definition of the Sophist starts, is puzzling. Prima facie the art of separating does not fit the initial division of art between ποιητικὴ τέχνη and κτητικὴ τέχνη at 219a8–c9. Therefore, scholars generally agree that, although mutually exclusive, ποιητική and κτητική are not exhaustive and leave room for a third species of art, διακριτικὴ τέχνη, on a par with ποιητική and κτητική. However, I argue that textual evidence suggests otherwise.
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  26. ‘I Will Interpret’: The Eighth Letter as a Response to Plato's Literary Method and Political Thought.Carol Atack - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):616-635.
    This paper explores the political thought and literary devices contained in the pseudo-PlatonicEighth Letter, treating it as a later response to the political thought and literary style of Plato, particularly the exploration of the mixed constitution and the mechanisms for the restraint of monarchical power contained in theLaws. It examines the specific historical problems of this letter, and works through its supposed Sicilian context, its narrator's assessment of the situation, and the lengthy prosopopoeia of the dead Syracusan politician Dion, before (...)
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  27. Piety and Annihilation in Plato’s Phaedo.Emily Austin - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (4):339-358.
    At the close of Plato’s Apology, Socrates argues that death is a benefit regardless of whether it results in annihilation or an afterlife. According to the standard interpretation, Socrates of the Phaedo rejects the idea that annihilation is a benefit, instead arguing that the soul is immortal and that annihilation would harm a philosopher. Socrates certainly suggests in a few passages that he would resent annihilation. In this paper, however, I argue that the Phaedo does not mark a significant shift (...)
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  28. Plato and the Invention of Life, by Michael Naas. [REVIEW]Will Barnes - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):469-473.
  29. Philosophic Appearance and Sophistic Essence in Plato’s Sophist.Daniel Esses - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):295-317.
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  30. Sugerencias sobre el modo de combinar las formas platónicas para superar las dificultades interpretativas del diálogo Parménides. La distinción entre la participación inmediata y la participación relacional.Gerardo Óscar Matía Cubillo - 2019 - Endoxa 43:41-66.
    Este trabajo pretende ser una referencia útil para los estudiosos de la filosofía de Platón. Aporta un enfoque original a la investigación de los procesos lógicos que condicionan que unas formas participen de otras. Con la introducción del concepto de participación relacional, abre una posible vía de solución a las distintas versiones del argumento del «tercer hombre». Puede resultar de interés asimismo el método de generación de los números a partir de lo par y lo impar, propuesto en la interpretación (...)
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  31. Plato on the Value of Philosophy: The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus. By Tushar Irani.Christopher Moore - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (1):238-243.
  32. The Jellyfish’s Pleasures: Philebus 20b-21d.Katharine R. O’Reilly - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):277-291.
    Scholars have characterised the trial of the life of pleasure in Philebus 20b-21d as digressive or pejorative. I argue that it is neither: it is a thought experiment containing an important argument, in the form of a reductio, of the hypothesis that a life could be most pleasant without cognition. It proceeds in a series of steps, culminating in the precisely chosen image of the jellyfish. Understanding the intended resonance of this creature, and the sense in which it is deprived, (...)
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  33. Socrates and Self-Knowledge. By Christopher Moore.William Prior - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (1):230-234.
  34. What Is the Meaning of Socrates' Last Words?C. T. Ricciardone - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):267-293.
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  35. Attitudinal Pleasure in Plato’s Philebus.Brooks A. Sommerville - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):247-276.
    This paper addresses two interpretive puzzles in Plato’s Philebus. The first concerns the claim, endorsed by both interlocutors, that the most godlike of lives is a pleasureless life of pure thinking. This appears to run afoul of the verdict of the earlier so-called ‘Choice of Lives’ argument that a mixed life is superior to either of its ‘pure’ rivals. A second concerns Socrates’ discussion of false pleasure, in which he appears to be guilty of rank equivocation. I argue that we (...)
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  36. Plato’s Trial of Athens, Written by Mark A. Ralkowski.Yun Lee Too - 2019 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 13 (2):200-202.
  37. Plato and the Invention of Life, Written by Michael Naas. [REVIEW]Hilde Vinje - 2019 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 13 (2):197-199.
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  38. Plato and the Body: Reconsidering Socratic Asceticism, by Coleen P. Zoller. [REVIEW]Michael F. Wagner - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):481-484.
  39. A READING OF PLATO'S REPUBLIC - Frank Poetic Justice. Rereading Plato's Republic. Pp. Xii + 251. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. Paper, US$30 . ISBN: 978-0-226-51577-9. [REVIEW]Roslyn Weiss - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):54-56.
  40. Wrong Turns in the Euthyphro.Paul Woodruff - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (2):117-136.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  41. « Exaiphnès » En Tant Qu' « Apex » De La Dynamique Qui Nous Amène Au « Beau » Chez Platon.Stanislao Allegretti - 2018 - In Le Beau Actes du XXXVI Congrès de l'ASPLF. Iași, Romania: pp. 163-170.
    Le concept de « beau » assume un rôle essentiel dans la philosophie platonicienne, puisqu’il exprime cette vision ou cette connaissance « supérieure » qu'on n’atteint qu’au terme de la démarche dialectique. Cette contribution examinera un aspect particulier de cette démarche, ce moment que l’on pourrait définir comme la « figure du milieu », puisqu’il se situe entre deux états de choses totalement différents, à l’apex du processus dialectique : l’exaiphnès. Exaiphnès représente pour Platon un « soudainement » très particulier. (...)
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  42. Πέφυκεν Πλεονεκτεῖν? Plato and the Sophists on Greed and Savage Humanity.Chloe Balla - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):83-101.
  43. Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato, Edited by Debra Nails and Harold Tarrant.Sara Brill - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):572-576.
  44. Il teatro platonico della virtù, edited by Fulvia De Luise.Filippo Forcignano - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):607-611.
  45. The Atlantis Story in Plato. C. Gill Plato's Atlantis Story. Text, Translation and Commentary. Pp. X + 222, Ills. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2017. Paper, £19.95 . Isbn: 978-1-78694-015-5. [REVIEW]Lloyd P. Gerson - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):37-38.
  46. Global Security and Economic Asymmetry: A Comparison of Developed and Developing Countries.Aida Guliyeva, Igor Britchenko & Ulviyya Rzayeva - 2018 - Journal of Security and Sustainability Issues 7 (4):707-719.
    This paper tackles the asymmetry of economic interests and geopolitics between developed and developing countries. Currently, the geopolitics presupposes that the majority of novel technologies are devised and designed in developed countries with their subsequent transfer to the developing countries. Moreover, in the context of the global crisis, the issue of de-dollarization is relevant from the political and economic points of view. Our specific focus is on the small oil countries and the issue how to get off the oil needle (...)
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  47. Socrates and Plato.Alex Long - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (3):351-358.
  48. Murder and Midwifery: Metaphor in the Theaetetus.Madeline Martin-Seaver - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):97-111.
    The Theaetetus's midwifery metaphor is well-known; less discussed is the brief passage accusing Socrates of behaving like Antaeus. Are philosophers midwives or monsters? Socrates accepts both characterizations. This passage and Socrates's acceptance of the metaphor creates a tension in the text, birthing a puzzle about how readers ought to understand the figure of the philosopher. Because metaphors play a pivotal role in the dialogue's ethical project, the puzzle presents not simply a textual tension but a question of how and why (...)
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  49. Wisdom Won From Illness: Essays in Philosophy and Psychoanalysis, by Jonathan Lear: Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017, Pp. 328, US$39.95. [REVIEW]Melissa McBay Merritt - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):625-625.
  50. Dividing Plato’s Kinds.Fernando Muniz & George Rudebusch - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (4):392-407.
    A dilemma has stymied interpretations of the Stranger’s method of dividing kinds into subkinds in Plato’sSophistandStatesman. The dilemma assumes that the kinds are either extensions or intensions. Now kinds divide like extensions, not intensions. But extensions cannot explain the distinct identities of kinds that possess the very same members. We propose understanding a kind as like an animal body—the Stranger’s simile for division—possessing both an extension and an intension. We find textual support in the Stranger’s paradigmatic four steps for collecting (...)
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