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  1. Perfect Change in Plato's Sophist.Tushar Irani - 2022 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 60:45-93.
    This paper examines how Plato’s rejection of the friends of the forms at 248a–249b in the Sophist is continuous with the arguments that he develops shortly after this part of the dialogue for the interrelatedness of the forms. I claim that the interrelatedness of the forms implies that they are changed, and that this explains Plato’s rejection of the friends of the forms. Much here turns on the kind of change that Plato wants to attribute to the forms. I distinguish (...)
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  2. The Koinōnia of Non-Being and Logos in the Sophist Account of Falsehood.Michael Wiitala - 2022 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 34:235-249.
    At Sophist 260e3-261a2, the Eleatic Stranger claims that in order to demonstrate that falsehood is, he and Theaetetus must first track down what speech (logos), opinion (doxa), and appearance (phantasia) are, and then observe the communion (koinōnia) that speech, opinion, and appearance have with non-being. The Stranger, however, never explicitly discusses the communion of speech, opinion, and appearance with non-being. Yet presumably their communion is implicit in his account of falsehood, given his claim that observing that communion is needed in (...)
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  3. Differentiating Philosopher From Statesman According to Work and Worth.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):550-566.
    Plato’s Sophist and Statesman stand out from many other Platonic dialogues by at least two features. First, they do not raise a ti esti question about a single virtue or feature of something, but raise the questions what sophist, statesman, and philosopher are, how they differ from each other, and what worth each should be accorded. Second, a visitor from Elea, rather than Socrates, seeks to addressed these questions and does so by employing what is commonly referred to as the (...)
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  4. ‘Pushing Through’ in Plato’s Sophist: A New Reading of the Parity Assumption.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):159-188.
    At a crucial juncture in Plato’s Sophist, when the interlocutors have reached their deepest confusion about being and not-being, the Eleatic Visitor proclaims that there is yet hope. Insofar as they clarify one, he maintains, they will equally clarify the other. But what justifies the Visitor’s seemingly oracular prediction? A new interpretation explains how the Visitor’s hope is in fact warranted by the peculiar aporia they find themselves in. The passage describes a broader pattern of ‘exploring both sides’ that lends (...)
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  5. Diairesis_ and _Koinonia_ in _Sophist 253d1-E3.Colin C. Smith - 2020 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 38 (1):1-20.
    Here I interpret a central passage in Plato's Sophist by focusing on understudied elements that provide insight into the fit of the dialogue's parts and the Sophist-Statesman diptych as a whole. I argue that the Eleatic Stranger's account of what the dialectician "adequately views" at Sophist 253d1-e3 involves both division and the communion of ontological kinds, not just one or the other as has been typically argued. I also consider other key passages and the turn throughout the dialogue from imagistic (...)
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  6. A herança e o parricídio: o eleatismo no Sofista de Platão.Victor Hugo Fonseca da Silva Coelho - 2019 - Dissertation, University of São Paulo, Brazil
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  7. The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
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  8. The Dynamic Association of Being and Non-Being: Heidegger’s Thoughts on Plato’s Sophist Beyond Platonism.SangWon Lee - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (3):385-403.
    This article examines Heidegger’s interpretation of Plato’s Sophist, focusing on his attempts to grasp Plato’s original thinking of being and non-being. Some contemporary thinkers and commentators argue that Heidegger’s view of Plato is simply based on his criticism against the traditional metaphysics of Platonism and its language. But a close reading of his lecture on the Sophist reveals that his view of Plato is grounded in Plato’s questioning struggle with the ambiguous nature of human speech or language. For Heidegger, Plato’s (...)
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  9. What the Dialectician Discerns: A New Reading of Sophist 253d-E.Mitchell Miller - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (2):321-352.
    At Sophist 253d-e the Eleatic Visitor offers a notoriously obscure description of the fields of one-and-many that the dialectician “adequately discerns.” Against the readings of Stenzel, Cornford, Sayre, and Gomez-Lobo, I propose an interpretation of that passage that takes into account the trilogy of Theaetetus-Sophist-Statesman as its context. The key steps are to respond to the irony of Socrates’ refutations at the end of the Theaetetus by reinterpreting the last two senses of logos as directed to forms and to recognize (...)
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  10. Motion and Rest as Genuinely Greatest Kinds in the Sophist.Christopher Buckels - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):317-327.
    The paper argues that Motion and Rest are “greatest kinds” and not just convenient examples, since they are all-pervading. Thus Motion and Rest can be jointly predicated of a single subject and can be predicated of each other, just as Sameness and Otherness can. While Sameness and Otherness are opposites, a single subject may be the same in one respect, namely, the same as itself, and other in another respect, namely, other than other things. Thus they can be predicated of (...)
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  11. PLATO, SOPHIST_- P. Crivelli Plato's Account of Falsehood. A Study of the _Sophist. Pp. Xii + 309. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cased, £57, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-521-19913-1. [REVIEW]Mary Louise Gill - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (1):53-55.
  12. Plato’s Theory of the Intercommunion of Forms : The Sophist 259, E4-6.Alireza Saati - 2015 - Philosophy Study 5 (1).
  13. Non-Being and the Structure of Privative Forms in Plato’s Sophist.Michael Wiitala - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):277-286.
    In Plato’s Statesman, the Eleatic Stranger explains that the division of all human beings into Greek and barbarian is mistaken in that it fails to divide reality into genuine classes or forms (eidē). The division fails because “barbarian” names a privative form, that is, a form properly indicated via negation: non-Greek. This paper examines how the Stranger characterizes privative forms in the Sophist. I argue that although the Stranger is careful to define privative forms as fully determinate, he nevertheless characterizes (...)
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  14. The Secret Doctrine and the Gigantomachia: Interpreting Plato’s Theaetetus-Sophist.Brad Berman - 2014 - Plato Journal 14:53-62.
    The Theaetetus’ ‘secret doctrine’ and the Sophist ’s ‘battle between gods and giants’ have long fascinated Plato scholars. I show that the passages systematically parallel one another. Each presents two substantive positions that are advanced on behalf of two separate parties, related to one another by their comparative sophistication or refinement. Further, those parties and their respective positions are characterized in substantially similar terms. On the basis of these sustained parallels, I argue that the two passages should be read together, (...)
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  15. Paolo Crivelli, Plato's Account of Falsehood: A Study of the Sophist. [REVIEW]Daniel Bloom - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (1-2):7-10.
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  16. Os Problemas da Opinião Falsa e da Predicação no diálogo Sofista de Platão.Francisco de Assis Vale Cavalcante Filho - 2014 - Dissertation, UFPB, Brazil
  17. Plato’s Account of Falsehood: A Study of the Sophist by Paolo Crivelli. [REVIEW]Noburu Notomi - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):601-602.
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  18. Plato’s Theory of Negation and Falsity in Sophist 257 and 263: A New Defense of the Oxford Interpretation.Job van Eck - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (2):275-288.
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  19. Difference in Kind: Observations on the Distinction of the Megista Gene.David Ambuel - 2013 - In Beatriz Bossi & Thomas M. Robinson (eds.), Plato's Sophist Revisited. de Gruyter. pp. 247-268.
    It is argued that the analysis by which the gene are differentiated in the dialogue is an exercise in studied ambiguities informed by an Eleatic logic of strict dichotomy that was the underpinning of the Sophist's method of division. By this dialectical drill, Plato shows that the metaphysics underlying the Visitor's method fails to adequately distinguish what it means to have a character from what it means to be a character, and therefore remains inadequate to track down the sophist or (...)
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  20. Plato's "Sophist" Revisited.Beatriz Bossi & Thomas M. Robinson (eds.) - 2013 - Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.
    This book consists of a selection of papers which throw new light on old problems in one of Plato s most difficult dialogues. The first set of papers deals with definitions of sophistry from different perspectives. In the central section E. Hulsz, D. O'Brien, B. Bossi, P. Mesquita and N. Cordero consider the problem of being and relative non-being with regard to Heraclitus and the legacy of Parmenides. The final section with papers by F. Fronterotta, J. de Garay, D. Ambuel (...)
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  21. Plato’s Account of Falsehood: A Study of the Sophist, by Paolo Crivelli. [REVIEW]Paul M. Livingston - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):431-438.
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  22. Plato and Peirce on Likeness and Semblance.Han-Liang Chang - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):301-312.
    In his well-known essay, ‘What Is a Sign?’ (CP 2.281, 285) Peirce uses ‘likeness’ and ‘resemblance’ interchangeably in his definition of icon. The synonymity of the two words has rarely, if ever, been questioned. Curiously, a locus classicus of the pair, at least in F. M. Cornford’s English translation, can be found in a late dialogue of Plato, namely, the Sophist. In this dialogue on the myth and truth of the sophists’ profession, the mysterious ‘stranger’, who is most likely Socrates’ (...)
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  23. Plato’s Absolute and Relative Categories at Sophist 255c14.Matthew Duncombe - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):77-86.
    Sophist 255c14 distinguishes καθ’ αὑτά and πρὸς ἄλλα (in relation to others). Many commentators identify this with the ‘absolute’ and ‘relative’ category distinction. However, terms such as ‘same’ cannot fit into either category. Several reliable manuscripts read πρὸς ἄλληλα (in relation to each other) for πρὸς ἄλλα. I show that πρὸς ἄλληλα is a palaeographically plausible reading which accommodates the problematic terms. I then defend my reading against objections.
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  24. Entre la semejanza y la apariencia. La reflexión sobre la imagen y la captura del sofista en el Sofista de Platon.Alfonso Florez - 2012 - Pensamiento 68 (256):357-371.
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  25. The Eleatic Visitor's Method of Division.Laura Grams - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (2):130-156.
  26. Those Frightening Men: A New Interpretation of Plato’s Battle of Gods and Giants.Bradley Jay Strawser - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):217-232.
    In Plato’s Sophist an argument against metaphysical materialism in the “battle of gods and giants” is presented which is oft the cause of consternation, primarily because it appears the characters are unfair to the materialist position. Attempts to explain it usually resort to restructuring the argument while others rearrange the Sophist entirely to rebuild the argument in a more satisfying form. I propose a different account of the argument that does not rely on a disservice to the materialist nor restructuring (...)
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  27. Modes of Being at Sophist 255c-E.Fiona Leigh - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (1):1-28.
    Abstract I argue for a new interpretation of the argument for the non-identity of Being and Difference at Sophist 255c-e, which turns on a distinction between modes of being a property. Though indebted to Frede (1967), the distinction differs from his in an important respect: What distinguishes the modes is not the subject's relation to itself or to something numerically distinct, but whether it constitutes or conforms to the specification of some property. Thus my view, but not his, allows self-participation (...)
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  28. Restless Forms and Changeless Causes.Fiona Leigh - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):239-261.
    It is widely held that in Plato's Sophist, Forms rest or change or both. The received opinion is, however, false—or so I will argue. There is no direct support for it in the text and several passages tell against it. I will further argue that, contrary to the view of some scholars, Plato did not in this dialogue advocate a kind of change recognizable as 'Cambridge change', as applicable to his Forms. The reason that Forms neither change nor rest is (...)
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  29. Ignorance, Shame and Love of Truth: Diagnosing the Sophist’s Error in Plato’s Sophist.Micah Lott - 2012 - Phoenix 66 (1-2):36-56.
  30. Plato's Sophist 259E4-6.Simon Noriega-Olmos - 2012 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (2).
  31. Plato’s and Aristotle’s Answers to the Parmenides Problem.C. J. Wolfe - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (4):747-764.
    This paper explores Plato and Aristotle 's responses to the pre-Socratic philosopher Parmenides, who paradoxically said that there is no such thing as non-being, and no such things as change. I argue that Plato’s response would have been good enough to defeat the claim in a debate, thereby remedying the political aspects of the Parmenides problem. However, Aristotle ’s answer is required to answer some additional philosophical and scientific aspects. Plato's Sophist is a very difficult dialogue to understand; seeing it (...)
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  32. The Coy Eristic: Defining the Image That Defines the Sophist.David Ambuel - 2011 - In Ales Havlicek & Filip Karfik (eds.), Plato's Sophist: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Platonicum Pragense. Oikoymenh. pp. 278-310.
    The eponymous dialogue presents the sophist as a figure who defies definition, and those difficulties are attributed to the conception of the image. Ultimately, the sophist is defined as a species of image maker. The image, however, which is important throughout the Platonic corpus as a metaphor, an analogy, and a metaphysical concept as well, receives in the Sophist little clarification or definition apart from whatever may be inferred from the division of image making arts. In the Sophist, the sophist (...)
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  33. Plato's Account of Falsehood: A Study of the Sophist.Paolo Crivelli - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Some philosophers argue that false speech and false belief are impossible. In the Sophist, Plato addresses this 'falsehood paradox', which purports to prove that one can neither say nor believe falsehoods. In this book Paolo Crivelli closely examines the whole dialogue and shows how Plato's brilliant solution to the paradox is radically different from those put forward by modern philosophers. He surveys and critically discusses the vast range of literature which has developed around the Sophist over the past fifty years, (...)
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  34. Verschiedenheit der Menschentypen in Platons Sophistes.Jakub Jinek - 2011 - In A. Havlíček – F. Karfík (ed.), Plato's Sophist: Proceedings of the Sixth Symposium Platonicum Pragense. Prague: Oikúmené. pp. 328–343.
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  35. Formal Structures in Plato's Dialogues: Theaetetus, Sophist and Statesman.Francisco L. Lisi, Maurizio Migliori & Josep Monserrat (eds.) - 2011 - Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag.
  36. Non-Being and Memory: A Critique of Pure Difference.Frank Scalambrino - 2011 - Dissertation, Duquesne University
    [PHILPEOPLE DOESN'T ALLOW PARAGRAPH BREAKS IN ABSTRACTS...] My [Frank Scalambrino's] dissertation first traces the development of a philosophical theory of ontological negation from Plato’s Parmenides and Sophist through Aristotle’s Metaphysics to Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, especially his “Table of Nothing” (A 292). Whereas Plato’s “puzzle of non-being” sets the stage for the subsequent discussion of ontological negation, Kant’s Table of Nothing provides a formalization of the possible solutions to the puzzle. According to Kant, there are four (4) different ways (...)
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  37. Platons Sophistes: Ein Kritischer Kommentar.Gustav Adolf Seeck - 2011 - Munchen: C.H. Beck.
    In Platons Dialog Sophistes wird nach der Definition des Sophisten gefragt; das führt zum Begriff des Nichtseienden und schließlich unter dem Stichwort 'Dialektik' auf die Frage nach dem Seienden. Daß Platon dabei von der sophistischen Methode ausgeht, das Seiende als bloße Spitze einer Begriffspyramide zu deuten, haben seine Interpreten seit jeher als irgendwie widersprüchlich empfunden. Dieser Kommentar ist für Leser gedacht, die bereit sind, den Sophistes genau zu studieren, aber dabei einen Begleiter haben möchten, der ihnen in möglichst direkter und (...)
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  38. Division and Definition in the Sophist.Lesley Brown - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 151--171.
  39. Division and Definition in Plato's Sophist and Statesman.Mary Louise Gill - 2010 - In David Charles (ed.), Definition in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 172--201.
  40. Being and Power in Plato's Sophist.Fiona Leigh - 2010 - Apeiron 43 (1):63-85.
  41. The Divine Logos: Plato, Heraclitus, and Heidegger in the Sophist.Ammon Allred - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):1-18.
    In this paper, I address the way in which Plato’s Sophist rethinks his lifelong dialogue with Heraclitus. Plato uses a concept of logos in this dialogue that is much more Heraclitean than his earlier concept of the logos. I argue that he employs this concept in order to resolve those problems with his earlier theory of ideas that he had brought to light in the Parmenides. I argue that the concept of the dialectic that the Stranger develops rejects, rather than (...)
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  42. Compte Rendu de David AMBUEL, Image and Paradigm in Plato's Sophist. [REVIEW]Marc-Antoine Gavray - 2009 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain:156-159.
  43. Le logos du sophiste. Image et parole dans le Sophiste de Platon.Felipe Ledesma - 2009 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 30 (2):207-254.
    The logos question, one of the most important among the subjects that traverse the Plato's Sophist, has in fact some different aspects: the criticism of father Parmenides' logos, that is unable to speak about the not-being, but also about the being; the relations between logos and its cognates, phantasia, doxa and dianoia; the logos’ complex structure, that is a compound with onoma and rema; the difference between naming and saying, two distinct but inseparable actions; the logical and ontological conditions that (...)
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  44. Plato on Art, Perspective, and Beauty in the Sophist.Fiona Leigh - 2009 - Literature & Aesthetics 19 (1):183-214.
  45. Image and Paradigm in Plato’s Sophist. [REVIEW]Xavier Marquez - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):181-187.
  46. The Sophist (D.) Ambuel Image and Paradigm in Plato's Sophist. Pp. Xviii + 279. Las Vegas: Parmenides Publishing, 2007. Cased, US$32. ISBN: 978-1-930972-04-. [REVIEW]Noburu Notomi - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (1):65-.
  47. Image and Reality in Plato's Sophist. By David Ambuel. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (4):697-697.
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  48. The Sophist on Statements, Predication, and Falsehood.Lesley Brown - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 437--62.
    Of the later dialogues of Plato, the Sophists stand out. This article highlights the concept of sophist as propounded by Plato. A didactic approach runs through the text. Socrates harps on the relation between sophist, philosopher and a statesman. Are they three different or they are the same. The basic idea that Plato wants to convey is, both features highlight some of the key enigmas of the dialogue: What is the relation between the outer and middle parts? How seriously are (...)
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  49. Method and Metaphysics in Plato's Sophist and Statesman.Mary Louise Gill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Sophist and Statesman are late Platonic dialogues, whose relative dates are established by their stylistic similarity to the Laws, a work that was apparently still “on the wax” at the time of Plato's death (Diogenes Laertius III.37). These dialogues are important in exhibiting Plato'sviews on method and metaphysics after he criticized his own most famous contribution to the history of philosophy, the theory of separate, immaterial forms, in the Parmenides. The Statesman also offers a transitional statement of Plato's political (...)
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  50. The Copula and Semantic Continuity in Plato's Sophist.Fiona Leigh - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 34:105-121.
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