This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

757 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 757
Material to categorize
  1. PLATO ON SOCRATES - (M.A.) Ralkowski Plato's Trial of Athens. Pp. X + 234. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019. Cased, £85, US$114. ISBN: 978-1-4742-2724-7. [REVIEW]Claudia Marsico - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (2):396-398.
  2. Erotic Themes in Plato - (L.) Brisson, (O.) Renaut (Edd.) Érotique Et Politique Chez Platon. Erôs, Genre Et Sexualité Dans la Cité Platonicienne. Pp. 274. Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag, 2017. Paper, €29.50. Isbn: 978-3-89665-725-1. [REVIEW]Ken Moore - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (2):398-401.
  3. Philosophy, Democracy and Poverty: The Philosopher as Political Agent.Oda Elisabeth Wiese Tvedt - 2018 - In Olof Petterson and Oda Tvedt Vivil Valvik Haraldsen (ed.), Plato´s Apology: Defending a Philosophical Life. London, Boulder, New York:
    The relation of philosophy to democracy remains at the center of attention in Oda Tvedt’s essay, ”Philosophy, Democracy and Poverty: The philosopher as political agent in the Apology of Plato”. Tvedt argues that the role of the philosopher as Socrates presents it in this work is first and foremost to be an agent of subversive political activity, and she finds support for this view of the philosopher’s role in other works of Plato as well as within the Apology itself. She (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Plato´s Apology: Defending a Philosophical Life.Oda Elisabeth Wiese Tvedt, Vivil Valvik Haraldsen & Olof Pettersson - 2018 - London, Boulder, New York: Lexington Books Inc.
    In Plato’s Apology of Socrates we see a philosopher in collision with his society—a society he nonetheless claims to have benefited through his philosophic activity. It has often been asked why democratic Athens condemned a philosopher of Socrates' character to death. This anthology examines the contribution made by Plato’s Apology of Socrates to our understanding of the character of Socrates as well as of the conception of philosophy Plato attributes to him. The 11 chapters offer complementary readings of the Apology, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Platon'un Toplum İdeali İçerisinde Kadının Yeri.Mete Han Arıtürk - 2016 - Posseible 10 (5):28-38.
    Öz -/- Antikçağ’dan modern dönemlere değin kadınların mevcut durumlarının iyileştirilmesine dair çalışmaların sayısının oldukça yetersiz kaldığını söylemek yanlış olmayacaktır. Bu bağlamda siyaset felsefesinin kurucu metinlerinden olan Devlet’in hem yazıldığı dönem hem de takip eden iki milenyuma yakın süre hesaba katıldığında kadınların toplumdaki rolü ve konumu üzerine oldukça radikal ve yenilikçi fikirleri barındırdığı açıktır. Bu çalışmada Platon’un diğer çalışmaları da hesaba katılmakla birlikte özellikle Devlet adlı eseri nezdinde nasıl olup da kimi düşünürlerce hem bir mizojinist hem de bir kadın hakları savunucusu (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Plato's The Allegory of the Cave.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    The main idea of this allegory is the difference between people who simply experience their sensory experiences, and call that knowledge, and those who understand real knowledge by seeing the truth. The allegory actually digs into some deep philosophy, which is not surprising since it comes from Plato. Its main idea is the discussion of how humans perceive reality and if human existence has a higher truth. It explores the theme of belief versus knowledge. The Perception Plato theorizes that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Exile and the Philosophical Challenge to Citizenship.Farhang Erfani & John Whitmire - 2004 - In Michael Hanne (ed.), Creativity in Exile. New York, NY, USA: Brill. pp. 41-56.
    Their paper begins with the observation that, even though many philosophers, especially in the twentieth century, have had personal experience of exile, they rarely treat the topic of exile directly in their philosophical works. Existentialist thinkers such as Heidegger, it is true, have employed exile as a metaphor for the human condition, yet the concrete experience of political exile has been treated as somehow lacking the universality that canonical philosophy needs. This paper warns against the temptation to conflate the real (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Principal Doctrines of Epicurus.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    Epicurean philosophy, as Epicurus's teachings became known, was used as the basis for how the community lived and worked. At the time, founding a school and teaching a community of students was the main way philosophical ideas were developed and transmitted. Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–322 BCE), for instance, founded a school in Athens called the Lyceum. Epicurus and his disciples believed either there were no gods or, if there were, the gods were so remote from humans that they were not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Plato, Statesman 275d8–E1.Vasilis Politis - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):575-581.
    In his dialogue Statesman, Plato first sets out one way of thinking of the statesperson, on the model of a nurturer of a herd such as a shepherd; then he sets out a very different way of thinking of him, on the model of a weaver of a social fabric. Critics have long been wondering whether Plato wants to combine the two models or, on the contrary, to abandon the nurturing model in favour of the weaving model.This article shows that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Epistemic Competence of the Philosopher-Rulers in Plato's Republic.S. O. Peprah - 2021 - Eirene: Studia Graeca Et Latina 57 (I-II):119-147.
    It is widely accepted that ruling is the sole prerogative of Plato’s philosopher-rulers because they alone possess knowledge (ἐπιστήμη). This knowledge is knowledge of the Good, taken to be the only knowledge there is in Kallipolis. Let us call this the sufficiency condition thesis (the SCT). In this paper, I challenge this consensus. I cast doubt on the adequacy of the SCT, arguing that part of the training and education of the philosopher-rulers involves their gaining practical wisdom (φρόνησις) and experience (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Courage of Thinking in Utopias: Gadamer's "Political Plato".Facundo Bey - 2021 - Analecta Hermeneutica 13:110-134.
    The aim of this article is to explore Gadamer’s early reflections on Plato’s utopian thought and its potential topicality. In the following section, I will show how areté, understood as a hermeneutical and existential virtue, is dialectically related to ethics and politics in Gadamer’s phenomenological reception of Plato’s philosophy. I argue that, in Gadamer’s eyes, Socratic-Platonic self-understanding enables human beings to be aware of their political responsibilities, to recognize how they are existentially and mutually related to the other, and to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Der Mensch und der Staat – Mit Platon zur Politik.Klaus-Peter Hufer - 2017 - Polis 20 (1):24-24.
  13. Review of Joshua Weinstein, "Plato's Threefold City and Soul". [REVIEW]Jeremy Reid - 2019 - Review of Politics 81:689-691.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Changing the Laws of the Laws.Jeremy Reid - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (2):413-441.
    Did Plato intend the laws of the Laws to change? While most scholars agree that there is to be legal change in Magnesia, I contend that this issue has been clouded by confusing three distinct questions: (1) whether there are legal mechanisms for changing the law in Magnesia, (2) what the attitudes of Magnesian citizens towards innovation and legal change are, and (3) whether Plato thinks the law is always the ultimate political authority. Once we separate these issues and look (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Biopolitics and Ancient Thought.Jussi Backman & Antonio Cimino (eds.) - 2022 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The volume studies, from different perspectives, the relationship between ancient thought and biopolitics, that is, theories, discourses, and practices in which the biological life of human populations becomes the focal point of political government. It thus continues and deepens the critical examination, in recent literature, of Michel Foucault's claim concerning the essentially modern character of biopolitics. The nine contributions comprised in the volume explore and utilize the notions of biopolitics and biopower as conceptual tools for articulating the differences and continuities (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Sophistic Criticisms of the Rule of Law. A Comparison of Callicles and Thrasymachus.Manuel Dr Knoll - 2021 - Philosophical Journal (Filosfický Časopis) 33 (2):65–87.
    The paper discusses different interpretations of Callicles and Thrasymachus’ positions. There are good reasons for interpreting Callicles as a critic of democracy and as an aristocratic political thinker whose political views are closer to Plato’s than is usually assumed. The paper argues that Callicles defends a natural right of the best citizens to rule over the crowd. However, in contrast to Plato, for Callicles the rule of the best should not aim at the common good but at their personal advantage. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Myth of Protagoras: A Naturalist Interpretation.Refik Güremen - 2017 - Méthexis 29:46-58.
    Protagoras’ Grand Speech is traditionally considered to articulate a contractualist approach to political existence and morality. There is, however, a newly emerging line of interpretation among scholars, which explores a naturalist layer in Protagoras’ ethical and political thought. This article aims to make a contribution to this new way of reading Protagoras’ speech, by discussing one of its most elaborate versions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The First City and First Soul in Plato’s Republic.Jerry Green - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):50-83.
    One puzzling feature of Plato’s Republic is the First City or ‘city of pigs’. Socrates praises the First City as a “true”, “healthy” city, yet Plato abandons it with little explanation. I argue that the problem is not a political failing, as most previous readings have proposed: the First City is a viable political arrangement, where one can live a deeply Socratic lifestyle. But the First City has a psychological corollary, that the soul is simple rather than tripartite. Plato sees (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Play and Moral Education in the Choruses of Plato’s Laws.Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    Among the educative games of Plato’s Cretan city, choral performances have a prominent role. This paper examines the function of play (παιδιά) in the choral education in virtue in Plato’s Laws. I reconstruct the notion of play as it is elaborated throughout this dialogue, and then show how it contributes to solving the problem of virtue acquisition in the Athenian’s account of moral education through songs and dances. I argue that play in the Laws is best understood an imitative activity (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Relações entre a noção de “cuidado-da-alma” e o “conhecimento de si” no Primeiro Alcibíades.Marcos Sidnei Pagotto-Euzebio - 2017 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 38 (1):93-108.
    O artigo busca apresentar as relações entre as exigências de cuidado-da-alma e a necessidade do conhecimento-de-si presentes no diálogo platônico Primeiro Alcibíades, indicando a forte ligação de tal aperfeiçoamento de si com o da pólis. Também as dimensões erótica, teológica, ética e política se encontram firmemente unidas no diálogo, visto que a formação do homem político exige o vínculo entre discípulo e mestre, sendo este o guia em direção ao reconhecimento da divindade, pois conhecer-se significa, ao final, conhecer a alma (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. State Typohumanism and its Role in the Rise of Völkisch-Racism: Paideía and Humanitas at Issue in Jaeger’s and Krieck’s ‘Political Plato’.Facundo Norberto Bey - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (12):1272-1282.
    The aim of this article is to provide a philosophical conceptual framework to understand the theoretical roots and political implications of the interpretations of Plato’s work in Jaeger’s Third Humanism and Krieck’s völkisch-racist pedagogy and anthropology. This article will seek to characterize, as figures of localitas, their conceptions of the individual, community, corporeality, identity, and the State that both authors developed departing from Platonic political philosophy. My main hypothesis is that Jaeger’s and Krieck’s interpretations of Platonic paideía shared several core-elements (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Why Did Socrates Conduct His Dialogues Before an Audience?Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2016 - History of Political Thought 37 (3):1-34.
    The Socratic method is conventionally understood to be a one-on-one interaction between Socrates and an individual interlocutor. Why, then, does Socrates conduct so many of his dialogues in public places, where they are prone to being witnessed or even interrupted? Through a careful reading of the Gorgias, a dialogue traditionally appealed to in studies of both the Socratic method and the philosophy of rhetoric, I argue that Socrates deliberately involves his audience in his conversations with individuals. The Socratic method seeks (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Plato's Myth of Er and the Reconfiguration of Nature.Tae-Yeoun Keum - 2020 - American Political Science Review 114 (1):54 - 67.
    Why did Plato conclude the Republic, arguably his most celebrated work of political theory, with the Myth of Er, an obscure story of indeterminate political-theoretical significance? This paper advances a novel reading of the Myth of Er that attends to the common plot that it shares with two earlier narrative interludes in the Republic. It suggests that Plato constructed the myth as an account of a search, akin to the sorting of potential philosopher-kings that underwrites the kallipolis’ educational curriculum, for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Wisdom and Violence: The Legacy of Platonic Political Philosophy in Al-Fārābī and Nietzsche.Peter S. Groff - 2006 - In Douglas Allen (ed.), Comparative Philosophy in Times of Terror. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 65-81.
    A vast historical, cultural and philosophical chasm separates the thought of the 10th century Islamic philosopher al-Farabi and Friedrich Nietzsche, the progenitor of postmodernity. However, despite their significant differences, they share one important commitment: an attempt to resuscitate and reappropriate the project of Platonic political philosophy, particularly through their conceptions of the “true philosopher” as prophet, leader, and lawgiver. This paper examines al-Farabi and Nietzsche’s respective conceptions of the philosopher as commander and legislator against the background of their Platonic source, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. The Tyrant’s Progress: The Meaning of ΤΥΡΑΝΝΟΣ in Plato and Aristotle.Edmund Stewart - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):208-236.
    This article considers a longstanding problem: what does the word τύραννος mean? And if it means ‘bad / tyrannical ruler’, why are good rulers called tyrants? The solution proposed here is that tyranny is not a fixed state of being, or not being, but instead a gradual process of development. To be called a tyrant, a ruler need not embody all the stereotypical traits of tyranny. If tyranny is, by definition, unconstitutional and illegitimate rule, then there may be no clear (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Is Protagoras’ Great Speech on Democracy?James Kierstead - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):199-207.
    The Great Speech of Protagoras in Plato’s dialogue is now widely seen as an expression of democratic theory, one of the earliest substantial expressions of democratic theory on record. At the same time, there have long been arguments to the contrary, the most formidable presentation of which is an article by Peter Nicholson that appeared in these pages in 1981. In this short piece, I address Nicholson’s skeptical arguments head-on and in full, in a way that has not yet been (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The (Meta)Politics of Thinking: On Arendt and the Greeks.Jussi Backman - 2021 - In Kristian Larsen & Pål Rykkja Gilbert (eds.), Phenomenological Interpretations of Ancient Philosophy. Brill. pp. 260-282.
    In this chapter, Jussi Backman approaches Hannah Arendt’s readings of ancient philosophy by setting out from her perspective on the intellectual, political, and moral crisis characterizing Western societies in the twentieth century, a crisis to which the rise of totalitarianism bears witness. To Arendt, the political catastrophes haunting the twentieth century have roots in a tradition of political philosophy reaching back to the Greek beginnings of philosophy. Two principal features of Arendt’s exchange with the ancients are highlighted. The first is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Division and Proto-Racialism in the Statesman.John Proios - 2022 - In Matthew Clemente, Bryan J. Cocchiara & William J. Hendel (eds.), misReading Plato: Continental and Psychoanalytic Glimpses Beyond the Mask. New York: Routledge Publishing. pp. 188-201.
    In Plato’s Statesman, the Eleatic Stranger applies a specialized method of inquiry—the “method of collection and division”, or “method of division”—in order to discover the nature of statecraft. This paper articulates some consequences of the fact that the method is both a tool for identifying natural kinds—that is, a tool for carving the world by its joints (Phaedrus 265b-d)—and social kinds—that is, the kinds depending on human beings for their existence and explanation. A central goal of the paper is to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2002 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    The book "Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism" focuses on two main aspects, construction and criticism. The constriction of Forms theory is the basis on which Plato built all of his philosophy and which influenced all forms of ideas philosophy that emerged after Plato. The research topic was completed by adding Aristotle's critique of the theory of Forms in order to put a clear picture in front of the reader, which was presented by Plato himself and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Plato as Critical Theorist, by Jonny Thakkar. [REVIEW]Rachel Singpurwalla - 2021 - Philosophical Review 130 (1):145-149.
  31. Parrhēsia and Statesmanship in Plato’s Gorgias.Jeremy Bell - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):63-82.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Plato's Phaedrus After Descartes' Passions: Reviving Reason's Political Force.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - Lo Sguardo. Rivista di Filosofia 27:75-93.
    For this special issue, dedicated to the historical break in what one might call ‘the politics of feeling’ between ancient ‘passions’ (in the ‘soul’) and modern ‘emotions’ (in the ‘mind’), I will suggest that the pivotal difference might be located instead between ancient and modern conceptions of the passions. Through new interpretations of two exemplars of these conceptions, Plato’s Phaedrus and Descartes’ Passions of the Soul, I will suggest that our politics today need to return to what I term Plato’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Poetic Justice. Rereading Plato’s Republic, Written by Jill Frank.Anne-Marie Schultz - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):148-152.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Rewriting Contemporary Political Philosophy with Plato and Aristotle: An Essay on Eudaimonic Politics, Written by Paul Schollmeier.Jonny Thakkar - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):157-161.
  35. Les mules du Parthénon et la liberté en démocratie. Note sur la République de Platon VIII, 563c7-d1.David Lévystone - 2020 - L'Antiquité Classiqué 80:177-184.
  36. Review of Jean-Francois Pradeau, Plato and the City and of Thanassis Samaras, Plato on Democracy.Malcom Schofield - 2003 - Plato Journal 3.
    Jean-Francois Pradeau, Plato and the City, Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2002. Hardback 0 85989 653 6 3 £45.00/US$75.00. Paperback 0 85989 654 4 £14.99/US$24.95. Thanassis Samaras, Plato on Democracy, New York: Peter Lang, 2002. Hardback 0 8204 5681 0. US$70.95.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The Mixed Constitution in Plato’s Laws.Jeremy Reid - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):1-18.
    In Plato's Laws, the Athenian Visitor says that the best constitution is a mixture of monarchy and democracy. This is the theoretical basis for the institutions of Magnesia, and it helps the citizens to become virtuous. But what is meant by ‘monarchy’ and ‘democracy’, and how are they mixed? I argue that the fundamental relations in Plato's discussion of constitutions are those of authority and equality. These principles are centrally about the extent to which citizens submit to the judgment of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Politics of the Idea: (Anti-)Platonic Politics in Arendt and Badiou.Jussi Backman - 2020 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 12 (3):168-181.
    This paper compares two influential but conflicting contemporary models of politics as an activity: those of Hannah Arendt and Alain Badiou. It discovers the fundamental difference between their approaches to politics in their opposing evaluations of the contemporary political significance of the legacy of Plato, Platonism, and the Platonic Idea. Karl Popper’s and Arendt’s analyses of the inherently ideological nature of totalitarianism are contrasted with Badiou’s vindication of an ideological “politics of the Idea.” Arendt and Badiou are shown to share (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Platon, Oeuvres Completes XI: Les Lois.L. A. Post & Edouard des Places - 1954 - American Journal of Philology 75 (2):201.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. La philosophie politique de Platon dans les Lois.Glenn R. Morrow & Maurice Vanhoutte - 1955 - American Journal of Philology 76 (4):425.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Plato's Cretan City: A Historical Interpretation of the Laws.James H. Oliver & Glenn R. Morrow - 1962 - American Journal of Philology 83 (4):447.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42. On the Tribal Courts in Plato's Laws.Glenn R. Morrow - 1941 - American Journal of Philology 62 (3):314.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Plato's Law of Slavery in Its Relation to Greek Law.Stanley B. Smith & Glenn R. Morrow - 1942 - American Journal of Philology 63 (3):365.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Why Socrates’ Legs Didn’T Run Off to Megara.Ellisif Wasmuth - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):380-413.
    I argue that the arguments presented in Socrates’ dialogue with the personified Laws of the Crito are arguments Socrates endorses and relies upon when deciding to remain in prison. They do not, however, entail blind obedience to every court verdict, nor do they provide necessary and sufficient conditions for resolving every dilemma of civil disobedience. Indeed, lacking definitional knowledge of justice, we should not expect Socrates to be able to offer such conditions. Instead, the Laws present an argument that is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Review of Rudolph (1996): Polis und Kosmos. Naturphilosophie und politische Philosophie bei Platon. [REVIEW]Annette Sell - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):234-237.
  46. The Art of Politics as Weaving in Plato’s Statesman.Kristin Sampson - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):485-500.
    This article asserts the significance of the portrayal of the political art of statesmanship as weaving, and aims to show how this image emphasizes two main aspects of the political art of statesmanship. Firstly, the image implies a three-dimensionality, both through the process of weaving and through the thickness of the protective fabric this produces, that in turn indicates the vital aspect of corporeality in politics. Secondly, weaving as a paradigmatic example of the art of statesmanship presents a way of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Polis and Cosmos in Plato’s Laws.Ryan Balot - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):516-533.
    Recent scholarship has followed Glenn Morrow in seeking to understand Plato’s politics in light of his cosmology. This essay takes a different tack and interprets the theology and cosmology of the Laws as an outgrowth of the Athenian Stranger’s conversation with Kleinias, which focuses on politics and warfare. In that sense the arguments of Book 10 are closely tied to the context of the dialogue. The Athenian Stranger’s religious ideology is not designed to be permanent or universally applicable. Rather, it (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Sign of the Times: The Rise and Fall of Politics in Plato’s Statesman.Charlotta Weigelt - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):501-515.
    This article argues that the Statesman should be read as a historically informed reflection on the nature and possibility of political rule, and that it presents us with a dilemma precisely in this regard. On the one hand, as indicated by the famous myth on the evolution of the cosmos, politics is only possible today, in the age of Zeus, when man no longer is like a sheep, ruled by a caring herdsman, as he used to be in the age (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Offices of Magnesia.Jeremy Reid - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):567-589.
    In this article, I attempt to provide a complete and exhaustive list of all of the offices and major political roles proposed within the constitution of Magnesia, detailing the title of the office, number of offices, method of appointment, age or gender restrictions, length of term, and explicit responsibilities assigned to that office. This tabulation is intended to be useful for new readers of the Laws and to scholars of various methodological approaches interested in the political arrangements of Magnesia.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Plato’s Statesman and Laws: Theory, Context, and Method.Ryan Balot & Hallvard Fossheim - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):387-394.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 757