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  1. A CAÇA À SABEDORIA: a sophia a partir da Apologia de Platão.Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Carvalhar - 2020 - Dissertation, UFRJ, Brazil
    This is a study of sophía from the passage 20d-21a in Plato’s Apology. There, Socrates tries to understand what kind of wisdom he would have, since the Oracle of Delphi stated that no one would be wiser than him. An investigation of historical aspects was made to understand the trial of Socrates and conviction, also a mapping of sophía’s main uses through the corpus platonicum was built, as well an overview of the usage of this concept by others greek authors. (...)
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  2. The Unexamined Student is Not Worth Teaching: Preparation, the Zone of Proximal Development, and the Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (14):1367-1380.
    ‘Scaffolded learning’ describes a cluster of instructional techniques designed to move students from a novice position toward greater understanding, such that they become independent learners. Our Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning includes two phases not normally included in discussions of scaffolded learning, the preparatory and problematizing phases. Our article will illuminate this blind spot by arguing that these crucial preliminary elements ought to be considered an integral part of a scaffolding model. If instructors are cognizant of the starting position of (...)
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  3. A Eironeía de Sócrates e a Ironia de Platão nos primeiros diálogos.Antônio José Vieira de Queirós Campos - 2016 - Dissertation, PUC-Rio, Brazil
  4. Social Dexterity in Inquity and Argumentation: An Apologia of Socrates.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2016 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 2:6-27.
    While Euthyphro and Apology are widely taught, they do not offer a complete picture of the variety of ways in which Socrates interacts with his interlocutors in Plato’s dialogues. Perhaps the most important point we wish to bring home is that most, if not all, of Socrates’ discussions are carefully calibrated according to a certain social awareness. Through careful analysis of sections of the dialogues, we argue that aspects of discussions between Socrates and his interlocutors should serve as lessons for (...)
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  5. The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman. Moore - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300-322.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of example over their rhetorical appeal to the soul of the learner. Following a small but significant trend in recent rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigmata, following the discussion of example in (...)
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  6. Freeing Meno's Slave Boy: Scaffolded Learning in the Philosophy Classroom.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (1):25-49.
    This paper argues that a well known passage from Plato’s Meno exemplifies how to employ scaffolded learning in the philosophy classroom. It explores scaffolded learning by fully defining it, explaining it, and gesturing at some ways in which scaffolding has been implemented. We then offer our own model of scaffolded learning in terms of four phases and eight stages, and explicate our model using a well known example from Plato’s Meno as an exemplar. We believe that any practical concerns one (...)
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  7. Platonic Pedagogy in Augustine’s Dialogues.Erik Kenyon - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):151-168.
  8. Plato and Socrates: From an Educator of Childhood to a Childlike Educator?Walter Omar Kohan - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):313-325.
    This paper deals with two forms of education—Platonic and Socratic. The former educates childhood to transform it into what it ought to be. The latter does not form childhood, but makes education childlike. To unfold the philosophical and pedagogical dimensions of this opposition, the first part of the paper highlights the way in which philosophy is presented indirectly in some of Plato’s dialogues, beginning with a characterisation that Socrates makes of himself in the dialogue Phaedrus. The second part details Plato’s (...)
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  9. Conversation and Self-Sufficiency in Plato.Alex Long - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    A. G. Long presents a new account of the importance of conversation in Plato's philosophy.
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  10. Euthyphro’s Elenchus Experience: Ethical Expertise and Self-Knowledge. [REVIEW]Robert C. Reed - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):245-259.
    The paper argues that everyday ethical expertise requires an openness to an experience of self-doubt very different from that involved in becoming expert in other skills—namely, an experience of profound vulnerability to the Other similar to that which Emmanuel Levinas has described. Since the experience bears a striking resemblance to that of undergoing cross-examination by Socrates as depicted in Plato’s early dialogues, I illustrate it through a close reading of the Euthyphro, arguing that Euthyphro’s vaunted “expertise” conceals a reluctance to (...)
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  11. On Calling the Gods by the Right Names.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):168-193.
    Do you need to know the name of the god you're praying to? If you get the name wrong what happens to the prayer? What if the god has more than one name? Who gets to decide whether the name works (you or the god or neither)? What are names anyway? Are the names of the gods any different in how they work from any other names? Is there a way of fixing the reference without using the name so as (...)
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  12. The Eleusinian Mysteries in Pre-Platonic Thought. Metaphor, Practise and Imagery for Plato’s Symposium.Barbara Sattler - 2013 - In Vishwa Adluri (ed.), Greek Religion, Philosophy and Salvation. de Gruyter. pp. 151-190.
    This is part of a two-paper project to show in detail in ways that have not been attempted before that, in the Symposium, Plato uses the language and metaphors of the Eleusinian Mysteries as a template for the ascent to the Form of Beauty; and also to explain why he might have chosen to do so. The standard accounts of the Eleusinian Mysteries come from sources that have themselves been influenced by Plato and hence are unsuitable to demonstrating the extent (...)
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  13. Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  14. The Problem is Not Mathematics, but Mathematicians: Plato and the Mathematicians Again.H. H. Benson - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):170-199.
    I argue against a formidable interpretation of Plato’s Divided Line image according to which dianoetic correctly applies the same method as dialectic. The difference between the dianoetic and dialectic sections of the Line is not methodological, but ontological. I maintain that while this interpretation correctly identifies the mathematical method with dialectic, ( i.e. , the method of philosophy), it incorrectly identifies the mathematical method with dianoetic. Rather, Plato takes dianoetic to be a misapplication of the mathematical method by a subset (...)
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  15. Why is the Timaeus Called an Eikôs Muthos and an Eikôs Logos?Luc Brisson - 2012 - In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.
  16. Division as a Method in Plato.Hallvard Fossheim - 2012 - In Jakob Fink (ed.), The Development of Dialectic from Plato to Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
  17. The Ontology of Socratic Questioning in Plato's Early Dialogues.Sean D. Kirkland - 2012 - State University of New York Press.
    A provocative close reading revealing a radical, proto-phenomenological Socrates.
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  18. To What Extent Can Definitions Help Our Understanding? What Plato Might Have Said in His Cups.John W. Powell - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (5):698-713.
    There are grounds for taking Plato's agenda of searching for definitions to be ironic, and he points toward good arguments for being wary of trust in definitions.
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  19. Socrates and Philosophy in the Dialogues of Plato. By Sandra Peterson.Naomi Reshotko - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):433-440.
  20. Crisis of Community: The Topology of Socratic Politics in the Protagoras.Christopher P. Long - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):361-377.
    In Plato’s Protagoras Alcibiades plays the role of Hermes, the ‘ambassador god,’ who helps lead Socrates’ conversation with Protagoras through a crisis of dialogue that threatens to destroy the community of education established by the dialogue itself. By tracing the moments when Alcibiades intervenes in the conversation, we are led to an understanding of Socratic politics as always concerned with the course of the life of an individual and the proper time in which it might be turned toward the question (...)
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  21. Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.Marina Mccoy - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):203-208.
  22. Doing Some Good to Friends: Socrates’ Just Treatment of Polemarchus.R. Michael Olson - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:149-172.
    In this article I interpret the conversation that takes place between Socrates and Polemarchus in Book One of the Republic according to its dramatic logic by examining the rhetorical artfulness that informs Socrates’ argumentative tactics. After first examining Polemarchus’s character as obedient spiritedness, I then turn to the argument, showing that Socrates does not undermine Polemarchus’s original opinion but, rather, by making legitimate use of the analogy between justice and technē, moves him to attend to the useful knowledge implicit in (...)
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  23. Seeking Freedom From the Fregean Under the Description Methodology.Terry Penner - 2011 - In G. Anagnostopoulos (ed.), "Socratic, Platonic and Aristotelian studies" Essays in honnor of Gerasimos Santas. pp. 103-124.
  24. Therapy and Theory Reconstructed: Plato and His Successors: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 66:83-102.
    When we speak of philosophy and therapy, or of philosophy as therapy, the usual intent is to suggest that ‘philosophizing’ is or should be a way to clarify the mind or purify the soul. While there may be little point in arguing with psychoses or deeply-embedded neuroses our more ordinary misjudgements, biases and obsessions may be alleviated, at least, by trying to ‘see things clearly and to see them whole’, by carefully identifying premises and seeing what they – rationally – (...)
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  25. Trials of Reason. Plato and the Crafting of Philosophy.Dylan Futter - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):432-436.
  26. Pleasure Unlimited: Philebus and the Drama of the Unlimited.John Kress - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):13-34.
    The Philebus is a difficult dialogue, often criticized for treating obscure ontological questions while neglecting the dramatic aspect characteristic of the Platonic dialogue. In this paper, I argue that, while subtle, the dramatic dimension is essential in understanding the ontological inquiries pursued and the dialogue as a whole. I argue that the Philebus should be read as an agon, a dramatic contest, between Socrates, the advocate of nous, and Philebus, the silent advocate of hēdonē. I show that this contest about (...)
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  27. Platon Et la Question des Images.Makoto Sekimura - 2010 - Ousia.
  28. The Crane's Walk: Plato, Pluralism, and the Inconstancy of Truth.Jeremy Barris - 2009 - Fordham University Press.
    In The Crane's Walk, Jeremy Barris seeks to show that we can conceive and live with a pluralism of standpoints with conflicting standards for truth--with the truth of each being entirely unaffected by the truth of the others. He argues that Plato's work expresses this kind of pluralism, and that this pluralism is important in its own right, whether or not we agree about what Plato's standpoint is.The longest tradition of Plato scholarship identifies crucial faults in Plato's theory of Ideas. (...)
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  29. Philosophy and Poetry- Plato's Spirit and Literary Criticism.Avi Kujman - 2009 - Create Space.
    Avi Kujman claims against the attempt of philosophy to do away with poetry. In his opinion, this neglect involves the giving-up on the spirit or the ideal of wisdom for the political, all-too-political sphere of recognition. Poetry is of great avail for philosophy in the way up and in the way down, in the way to wisdom and in the way of instilling it to others. Mr. kujman, thus, fights against the tradition in order to achieve its implicit desire in (...)
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  30. Alcidamas, Isocrates, and Plato on Speech, Writing, and Philosophical Rhetoric.Marina Berzins Mccoy - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):45-66.
  31. GERASIMOS [or Seeking Freedom From the Fregean Under the Description Methodology].Terry Penner - 2009 - Philosophical Inquiry 31 (1-2):107-130.
  32. Christopher Rowe's Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):55-62.
    The review argues that Plato makes a valid distinction between inferior hypothetical and superior unhypothetical methods. Given the distinction, the book confuses the hypothetical for unhypothetical dialectic.
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  33. Examining the Role and Function of Socrates' Narrative Audience in Plato's Euthydemus.Anne-Marie Bowery - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):163-172.
  34. Platon: La Ferveur Et les Limites D’Un Discipolat.Niadi-Corina Cernica - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:239-248.
    Comment, Socrate, personnage historique et citoyen notoire de l’Athènes, est-il devenu une fiction littéraire dans les dialogues de Platon? Serait-il une réaction, assez étrange, au refus de socrate d’écrire? Quoi qu’il en soit, peu après la mort de Socrate, fait son apparition un nouveau genre nommé Socratikoi logoi. Outre Platon d’autres écrivains ont donné de telles compositions en dialogue: Eschine de Sphattos, Antistene, Aristipe, Bryson, Cebes, Criton, Euclide de Megara, Phaidon. Est-ce que les dialogues de jeunesse de Platon sont autre (...)
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  35. Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman (Review).Crystal Cordell - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):168-169.
    Crystal Cordell - Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 46.1 168-169 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Crystal Cordell University of TorontoÉcole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris Kenneth Sayre. Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Pp. xii + 265. Cloth, $75.00. In his most recent book on Plato, Kenneth Sayre argues that the Statesman is, first and (...)
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  36. On Plato's Use of Socrates as a Character in His Dialogues.Hallvard Fossheim - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5:239-263.
    In this essay, it is first argued that there are several important motivations for considering as wholly legitimate the question concerning the presence of Socrates in Plato’s work. After sketching how reason in Plato’s dialogues is generally portrayed as embedded in the soul as a whole, I then apply these insights in arguing that this relation between character and thinking should inform our understanding of Plato’s Socrates as well. Socrates is present in the texts because reason, according to Plato, is (...)
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  37. Method and Metaphysics in Plato's Sophist and Statesman.Mary Louise Gill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Sophist and Statesman are late Platonic dialogues, whose relative dates are established by their stylistic similarity to the Laws, a work that was apparently still “on the wax” at the time of Plato's death (Diogenes Laertius III.37). These dialogues are important in exhibiting Plato'sviews on method and metaphysics after he criticized his own most famous contribution to the history of philosophy, the theory of separate, immaterial forms, in the Parmenides. The Statesman also offers a transitional statement of Plato's political (...)
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  38. Metaphysics and Method in Plato’s Statesman.George Harvey - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):232-237.
  39. Plato's Dialogues and a Common Rationale for Dialogue Form.Alex Long - 2008 - In Simon Goldhill (ed.), The End of Dialogue in Antiquity. Cambridge University Press.
  40. Kenneth M. Sayre, Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman Reviewed By.Patrick Mooney - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (4):296-298.
  41. Socrates, Rationality, and the Daimonion.John Partridge - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):285-309.
  42. Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez & Ravi Sharma - 2008 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008 (12.36).
  43. Enquiry and Discovery: A Discussion of Dominic Scott's Plato's Meno.Gail Fine - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 32:331-367.
  44. The Meno’s Metaphilosophical Examples.Matthew King - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):395-412.
    I propose that an ill-appreciated contrast between the examples Socrates gives Meno, to show him how he ought to philosophize, is the key to understanding the Meno. I contend that Socrates prefers hisdefinitions of shape to his account of color because the former are concerned with what shape is, while the latter is concerned with how color comes to be. This contrast suggests that Plato intends ananalogous contrast between the (properly philosophical) way of inquiry that leads to Socrates’ definition of (...)
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  45. ""Philosophical Training Grounds: Socratic Sophistry and Platonic Perfection in" Symposium" and" Gorgias".Joshua Landy - 2007 - Arion 15 (1):63-122.
    Plato’s character Socrates is clearly a sophisticated logician. Why then does he fall, at times, into the most elementary fallacies? It is, I propose, because the end goal for Plato is not the mere acquisition of superior understanding but instead a well-lived life, a life lived in harmony with oneself. For such an end, accurate opinions are necessary but not sufficient: what we crucially need is a method, a procedure for ridding ourselves of those opinions that are false. Now learning (...)
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  46. Review of Kenneth M. Sayre, Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman[REVIEW]Melissa Lane - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).
  47. Instances of Decision Theory in Plato’s Alcibiades Major and Minor and in Xenophon’s Memorabilia.Andre Archie - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):365-380.
    This essay discusses Socrates’ use of hypothetical choices as an early version of what was to become in the twentieth century the discipline of decision theory as expressed by one of its prominent proponents, F. P. Ramsey. Socrates’ use of hypothetical choices and thought experiments in the dialogues is a way of reassuring himself of an interlocutor’s philosophical potential. For example, to assess just how far Alcibiades is willing to go to attain his goal of being a great Athenian leader, (...)
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  48. Plato and the Love of Learning.Geoffrey Hinchliffe - 2006 - Ethics and Education 1 (2):117-131.
    This paper explores the relation between love, learning and knowledge as found in three dialogues of Plato, Symposium, Phaedrus and Republic. It argues that the account of the ascent from carnal desire to the love of beauty, as set out in the Symposium, is best seen in terms of a genealogy of love in which the object of love is transformed into an object of knowledge. The Phaedrus shows us how affection and love between two individuals can help motivate a (...)
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  49. Blondell The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Pp. Xi + 452. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Cased, £55, US$75. ISBN: 0-521-79300-9. [REVIEW]Angela Hobbs - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):51-54.
  50. Socrates in the Platonic Dialogues.Catherine Osborne - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):1–21.
    If Socrates is portrayed holding one view in one of Plato's dialogues and a different view in another, should we be puzzled? If (as I suggest) Plato's Socrates is neither the historical Socrates, nor a device for delivering Platonic doctrine, but a tool for the dialectical investigation of a philosophical problem, then we should expect a new Socrates, with relevant commitments, to be devised for each setting. Such a dialectical device – the tailor-made Socrates – fits with what we know (...)
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