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  1. Biology in the Timaeus’ Account of Nous and Cognitive Life.Douglas R. Campbell - forthcoming - In Melina G. Mouzala (ed.), Cognition in Ancient Greek Philosophy and its Reception: Intedisciplinary Approaches. Academia Verlag/Nomos. pp. 145-172.
    I develop an account of the role that biology plays in the Timaeus’ view of nous and other aspects of cognitive life. I begin by outlining the biology of human cognition. I then argue that these biological views shine an important light on different aspects of the soul. I then argue that the human body is particularly friendly to nous, paying special attention to the heart and the liver. I next consider the ways that the body fails to protect our (...)
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  2. Proportionate Atomism: Solving the Problem of Isomorphic Variants in Plato’s Timaeus.Lea Aurelia Schroeder - 2023 - Phronesis 68 (1):31-61.
    The principles governing elemental composition, variation, and change in Plato’s Timaeus appear to be incompatible, which has led commentators to prioritize some of the principles to the exclusion of others. Call this seeming incompatibility the problem of isomorphic variants. In this paper, I develop the theory of proportionate atomism as a solution to this problem. Proportionate atomism retains the advantages of rival interpretations but allows the principles of material composition, variation, and change to combine into an internally coherent and explanatorily (...)
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  3. Evil, Demiurgy, and the Taming of Necessity in Plato’s Timaeus.Elizabeth Jelinek & Casey Hall - 2022 - International Philosophical Quarterly 62 (1):5-21.
    Plato’s Timaeus reveals a cosmos governed by Necessity and Intellect; commentators have debated the relationship between them. Non-literalists hold that the demiurge, having carte blanche in taming Necessity, is omnipotent. But this omnipotence, alongside the attributes of benevolence and omniscience, creates problems when non-literalists address the problem of evil. We take the demiurge rather as limited by Necessity. This position is supported by episodes within the text, and by its larger consonance with Plato’s philosophy of evil and responsibility. By recognizing (...)
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  4. Plato on the Varieties of Knowledge.Justin Vlasits - 2022 - In Jens Kristian Larsen, Vivil Valvik Hareldsen & Justin Vlasits (eds.), New Perspectives on Platonic Dialectic: A Philosophy of Inquiry. pp. 264-283.
    Plato’s Philebus has often been said to lack unity as a dialogue. In particular, what is the relation between the methodological and metaphysical reflections early in the dialogue and the investigations of pleasure and knowledge that constitutes its main subject matter? This chapter argues that Plato’s Philebus provides a division of knowledge (epistēmē), which satisfies the methodological norms explained earlier in the dialogue. In order to make this claim, Socrates is shown to provide an example of a cross-cutting division not (...)
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  5. Embodied Intelligent Souls: Plants in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber D. Carpenter - 2021 - In Fabrizio Baldassarri & Andreas Blank (eds.), Vegetative Powers: The Roots of Life in Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Natural Philosophy. Cham: Springer. pp. 35-53.
    In the Timaeus, plants are granted soul, and specifically the sort of soul capable of perception and desire. But perception, according to the Timaeus, requires the involvement of to phronimon. It seems to follow that plants must be intelligent. I argue that we can neither avoid granting plants sensation in just this sense, nor can we suppose that the phronimon is something devoid of intelligence. Indeed, plants must be related to intelligence, if they are to be both orderly and good (...)
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  6. Replenishment and Maintenance of the Human Body.Lea Aurelia Schroeder - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):317-346.
    Scholarship on Plato's Timaeus has paid relatively little attention to Tim. 77a–81, a seemingly disjointed passage on topics including plants, respiration, blood circulation, and musical sounds. Despite this comparative neglect, commentators both ancient and modern have levelled a number of serious charges against Timaeus' remarks in the passage, questioning the coherence and explanatory power of what they take to be a theory of respiration. In this paper, I argue that the project of 77a–81e is not to sketch theories of respiration, (...)
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  7. Returning to the Heavens: Plato’s Socrates on Anaxagoras and Natural Philosophy.Samuel Ortencio Flores - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):123-146.
    Readers of Plato since antiquity have generally taken Socrates’ intellectual autobiography in the Phaedo as a signal of his turn away from the study of natural philosophy. They have turned instead to characters such as Timaeus for evidence of Plato’s pursuit of physics. This article argues that Plato’s Socrates himself developed a philosophy of nature in his criticism of Anaxagoras and his subsequent philosophic pursuits. Socrates’ autobiography places the study of nature in a foundational position within the development of his (...)
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  8. Hippocrates at phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
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  9. The Concept of Motion in Ancient Greek Thought: Foundations in Logic, Method, and Mathematics.Barbara M. Sattler - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the birth of the scientific understanding of motion. It investigates which logical tools and methodological principles had to be in place to give a consistent account of motion, and which mathematical notions were introduced to gain control over conceptual problems of motion. It shows how the idea of motion raised two fundamental problems in the 5th and 4th century BCE: bringing together being and non-being, and bringing together time and space. The first problem leads to the exclusion (...)
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  10. Teleology, Causation and the Atlas Motif in Plato's Phaedo.Daniel Vazquez - 2020 - Schole 14 (1):82-103.
    In this paper, I propose a new reading of Phaedo 99b6-d2. My main thesis is that in 99c6-9, Socrates does not refer to the teleological αἰτία but to the αἰτία that will be provided by a stronger ‘Atlas’ (99c4-5). This means that the passage offers no evidence that Socrates abandons teleology or modifies his views about it. He acknowledges, instead, that he could not find or learn any αἰτία stronger than the teleological one. This, I suggest, allows an interpretation of (...)
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  11. The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
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  12. A triptych in Plato's timaeus: A note on the receptacle passage.T. K. Johansen - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):885-886.
    At Timaeus 48e2–52d4 Timaeus sets out to establish that there are three principles or kinds underlying the creation of the cosmos, not just the two he acknowledged earlier. The way he does so is not simply by adding an account of the third kind to the accounts of being and becoming that he has already given. Rather he does so by showing how each of the three differs from the others. It has not been noticed how this procedure structures the (...)
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  13. The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato’s Timaeus.Josh Wilburn - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):627-652.
    In the tripartite psychology of the Republic, Plato characterizes the “spirited” part of the soul as the “ally of reason”: like the auxiliaries of the just city, whose distinctive job is to support the policies and judgments passed down by the rulers, spirit’s distinctive “job” in the soul is to support and defend the practical decisions and commands of the reasoning part. This is to include not only defense against external enemies who might interfere with those commands, but also, and (...)
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  14. Митеическа математика: Платоновият Тимей.А Лозев - 2014 - Философски Алтернативи / Philosophical Alternatives 1 (6):141-147.
    Reading the Timaeus as an early attempt at mathematizing natural science runs into serious difficulties. The so-called Platonic Solids are five in number, one more than the traditional 'elements'. Plato provides a proportional ratio for these elements but this ratio fails to tie in with their geometrical features. Appealing to the authority of mathematics appears to be a rhetorical move with no further consequences.
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  15. Timaeus in the Cave.Thomas Johansen - 2013 - In G. Boys-Stones, C. Gill & D. El-Murr (eds.), The Platonic Art of philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Unitarianism was the norm amongst ancient interpreters of Plato. One strategy they used to maintain the unity of his thinking was to argue that different works were saying the same things but in different modes. So, for example, the Republic was saying ethically what the Timaeus was saying in the manner of natural philosophy. In this paper, I want to offer an interpretation of the Cave image in Republic 7 which lends support to this division of labour, and so indirectly, (...)
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  16. One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today, Eds. Richard D. Mohr and Barbara M. Sattler. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2012 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (1):170-173.
  17. Il platonismo e le scienze.Riccardo Chiaradonna (ed.) - 2012 - Roma: Roma Tre Università degli studi.
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  18. The First Humans in Plato’s Timaeus.Pavel Gregorić - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):183-198.
    Plato’s Timaeus gives an account of the creation of the world and of human race. The text suggests that there was a first generation of human beings, and that they were all men. The paper raises difficulties for this traditional view, and considers an alternative, suggested in more recent literature, according to which humans of the first generation were sexually undifferentiated. The paper raises difficulties for the alternative view as well, and examines the third possibility, advocated by some ancient as (...)
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  19. Socrates and Timaeus.Catherine Zuckert - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):331-360.
    Plato’s Timaeus is usually taken to be a sequel to the Republic which shows the cosmological basis of Plato’s politics. In this article I challenge the traditional understanding by arguing that neither Critias’s nor Timaeus’s speech performs the assigned function. The contrast between Timaeus’s monologue and the silently listening Socrates dramatizes the philosophical differences between investigations of “the human things,” like those conducted by Socrates, and attempts to demonstrate the intelligible, mathematically calculable order of the sensible natural world, like that (...)
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  20. Plato's Hesiod and the Will of Zeus: Philosophical Rhapsody in the Timaeus and the Critias.Andrea Capra - 2009 - In G. R. Boys-Stones & J. H. Haubold (eds.), Plato and Hesiod. Oxford University Press.
  21. Comments on Plato's Causal Explanation.D. Z. Andriopoulos - 2008 - Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):115-143.
  22. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias. [REVIEW]Daryn Lehoux - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Science 41 (1):129-130.
  23. Plato’s Cosmology and its Ethical Dimensions—Gabriela Roxana Carone. [REVIEW]Dana Miller - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):498-500.
  24. Gabriela Roxana Carone, Plato's Cosmology and Its Ethical Dimensions Reviewed by.Michael L. Morgan - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (4):246-247.
  25. The Forms and the Sciences in Socrates and Plato.Terry Penner - 2006 - In Hugh H. Benson (ed.), A Companion to Plato. Malden, MA, USA: Blackwell. pp. 163–183.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The “What is X?” Question, the Sciences, Virtue, and the Forms Plato's “Argument from the Sciences” for the Existence of Forms, as Apparently Represented by Aristotle, and Aristotle's Criticism of that Argument Plato the Parmenidean Sciences and Pseudo‐Sciences The Good and the Sciences A Proposal: The Forms are Attributes; and There are No Attributes that are not Forms What about Plato's Other Reasons for Believing in Forms (Logical, or Mystical‐Metaphysical‐Theological)? And Won't These Reasons Make of (...)
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  26. Forms and The Sciences in Plato.Terry Penner - 2006 - In Hugh Benson (ed.), A Companion to Plato. pp. 165-183.
  27. Philosophie und Wissenschaften im Dialog bei Platon.Eva-Maria Engelen - 2005 - In Gereon Wolters & Martin Carrier (eds.), Homo Sapiens Und Homo Faber. De Gruyter. pp. 39.
    Nach Platon „vermittelt“ die Philosophie als Kunst der Dialektik durch Dialog zwischen Begriffen und Disziplinen. Um dies zu zeigen, wird hier eine Lektüre von Platons Symposion vorgestellt, in der das Verhältnis der Disziplinen mit Wissens- und Erziehungsanspruch in Platons Zeit beleuchtet wird. Jede Rede des Symposions ist wie eine Stellungnahme in einem Dialog zu verstehen, so dass das Gesamtwerk als sieben Reden zu lesen sind, die dialogisch aufeinander verweisen. Die Grundannahme dieser Lektüre besagt, dass den einzelnen Reden verschiedene Wissenschaften oder (...)
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  28. Plato's Theory of Colours in the Timaeus.Katerina Ierodiakonou - 2005 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:219-233.
    This article attempts to give a systematic analysis of the passage 67c4–68d7 from the Timaeus, in which we find Plato’s most detailed, but also extremely obscure, account of the nature and perception of colours. In particular, I focus first on the question how Plato conceives of colour, comparing Plato’s notion with that of Empedocles and showing Plato’s dependence on, but also divergence from, the Empedoclean tradition. Second, I discuss the question what, according to the Timaeus, makes things have the particular (...)
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  29. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias.Thomas Kjeller Johansen - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's dialogue the Timaeus-Critias presents two connected accounts, that of the story of Atlantis and its defeat by ancient Athens and that of the creation of the cosmos by a divine craftsman. This book offers a unified reading of the dialogue. It tackles a wide range of interpretative and philosophical issues. Topics discussed include the function of the famous Atlantis story, the notion of cosmology as 'myth' and as 'likely', and the role of God in Platonic cosmology. Other areas commented (...)
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  30. Socrates contra scientiam, pro fabula.Sean D. Kirkland - 2004 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):313-332.
    In the Phaedrus, Plato’s Socrates distinguishes himself from the natural scientists of his day and indicates that the true philosophical attitude, the love of realhuman wisdom, shares something essential with the mythical attitude. In the following essay, I argue that Socrates criticizes science here for its failure to attend to aporia, to recognize an essentially questionworthy aspect of the world of human experience, an aspect I will refer to as distance. Furthermore, I argue that Socrates aligns his own philosophical activity (...)
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  31. Plato's Philosophy And The Essence Of The Scientific Method.Jan Such - 2003 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 79:37-42.
  32. Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2002 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    The book "Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism" focuses on two main aspects, construction and criticism. The constriction of Forms theory is the basis on which Plato built all of his philosophy and which influenced all forms of ideas philosophy that emerged after Plato. The research topic was completed by adding Aristotle's critique of the theory of Forms in order to put a clear picture in front of the reader, which was presented by Plato himself and (...)
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  33. Did Plato Have a Philosophy of Science? A Discussion of Andrew Gregory, Plato's Philosophy of Science.Reviel Netz - 2002 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 23:247-263.
  34. Did Plato Have a Philosophy of Science? A Discussion of Andrew Gregory, Plato's Philosophy of Science.Reviel Netz - 2002 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume Xxiii: Winter 2002. Oxford University Press.
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  35. Plato’s Philosophy of Science.Andrew Gregory - 2000 - London: Duckworth.
    Seeking to reassess Plato's views on how we might investigate and explain the natural world, this book argues that many of the common charges against Plato (disinterest, ignorance, dismissal of observation) are unfounded, and that Plato had a series of important and cogent criticisms of the early atomists and other physiologoi. His views on science, and on astronomy and cosmology in particular, develop in interesting ways. It also argues that Plato can best be seen as someone who is struggling with (...)
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  36. Body, Soul and Tripartition in Plato's Timaeus.Thomas Johansen - 2000 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume Xix Winter 2000. Clarendon Press. pp. 87-111.
  37. Plato and eudoxus: Instrumentalists, realists, or prisoners of themata?S. N. - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (2):271-289.
  38. Plato's science: His view and ours of his.A. P. Mourelatos - 1991 - In Alan C. Bowen (ed.), Science and Philosophy in Classical Greece. Garland. pp. 11--30.
  39. The Meaning of "Dynamis" [Greek] at "Timaeus" 31c.Paul Pritchard - 1990 - Phronesis 35:182.
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  40. Socrates on the impossibility of belief-relative sciences.Terry Penner - 1988 - In Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy, Vol. III. pp. 263-325.
  41. Chapter Eight.Terry Penner - 1987 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):263-325.
  42. The Being of the Beautiful: Plato's Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesman.Seth Benardete (ed.) - 1984 - University of Chicago Press.
    _The Being of the Beautiful_ collects Plato’s three dialogues, the _Theaetetus_, _Sophist_, and _Statesmen_, in which Socrates formulates his conception of philosophy while preparing for trial. Renowned classicist Seth Benardete’s careful translations clearly illuminate the dramatic and philosophical unity of these dialogues and highlight Plato’s subtle interplay of language and structure. Extensive notes and commentaries, furthermore, underscore the trilogy’s motifs and relationships. “The translations are masterpieces of literalness.... They are honest, accurate, and give the reader a wonderful sense of the (...)
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  43. Plato's Astronomy.Ivor Bulmer-Thomas - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (01):107-.
    In one of the most disputed passages of Greek literature Plato in the Republic, 7. 528e–530c prescribes astronomy as the fourth study in the education of the Guardians. But what sort of astronomy? According to one school of thought it is a purely speculative study of bodies in motion having no relation to the celestial objects that we see. While this interpretation has rejoiced the hearts of Plato's detractors, who regard him as an obstacle to the progress of science, it (...)
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  44. Plato on the sciences.Georgios Anagnostopoulos - 1983 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):237 – 246.
  45. Science and the Sciences in Plato.[author unknown] - 1983 - Apeiron 17 (1):68-70.
  46. Science in Plato John P. Anton (ed.): Science and the Sciences in Plato. Pp. xvi + 128. New York: Eidos, 1980.Ivor Bulmer-Thomas - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (02):197-198.
  47. Science and the Sciences in Plato. [REVIEW]Charles Griswold - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (2):441-442.
    Almost everyone believes that the sciences have progressed tremendously since antiquity. It thus seems that only devout classicists would bother with the study of ancient science, not to mention with the study of ancient science as transfigured by characters in a Platonic dialogue. However, this transfiguration already mitigates the charge of irrelevance. For what may be true of empirical science is not necessarily true of the philosophy of science. Many of the same problems which preoccupy contemporary philosophers of science also (...)
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  48. Science and the Sciences in Plato by John P. Anton. [REVIEW]G. Lloyd - 1982 - Isis 73:308-309.
  49. Science and the sciences in Plato.John Peter Anton (ed.) - 1980 - Delmar, N.Y.: Caravan Books.
  50. Mathias Baltes: Die Weltentstehung des platonischen Timaios nach den antiken Interpreten, Teil I. (Philosophia Antiqua, 30. Pp. xiii + 247. Leiden: Brill, 1976. Paper, fl. 45. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (2):316-316.
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