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  1. Studies on the Text of Plato's Timaeus and Critias - Jonkers the Textual Tradition of Plato's Timaeus and Critias. Pp. XVIII + 548. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2017. Cased, €180, Us$202. Isbn: 978-90-04-32591-3. [REVIEW]Colin Guthrie King - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):363-365.
  2. On the Inauthenticity of the Critias.Marwan Rashed & Thomas Auffret - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (3):237-254.
    In this paper, we highlight a number of difficulties concerning the relationship between theCritiasand theTimaeus, notably a contradiction betweenTimaeus27a-b andCritias108a-c. On this basis we argue that theCritiasmust be considered spurious.
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  3. John Michell: From Atlantis to Avalon.Paul Screeton - 2010 - Alternative Albion.
    A celebration of John Michel's insights and far-reaching influence, revealing his pivotal role in alternative culture over the last five decades.
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  4. La noción de “hybris” en el Critias de Platón.Javier Picón Casas - 2008 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 20 (1):75-110.
    Se justifican tres tesis. Primera, el sentido mítico-religioso tradicional de la justicia como castigo de la [palabra en griego] quedó desacreditado durante la Guerra del Peloponeso, como bien lo muestra Tucídides. Segunda, en tiempos de Aristóteles, tal sentido ya habría desaparecido en favor de un nuevo paradigma basado en el concepto de [palabra en griego]. Tercera, la obra de Platón constituye uno de los últimos intentosde recuperar ese sentido mítico-religioso tradicional tratando de interpretar la Guerra del Peloponeso a través del (...)
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  5. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):610-614.
  6. Timaeus and Critias. Plato - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition combines the clearest translation yet of these crucial ancient texts with an illuminating introduction and diagrams.
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  7. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the 'Timaeus–Critias' – Thomas Kjeller Johansen.Scott Carson - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):131-133.
  8. (T.K.) Johansen Plato's Natural Philosophy. A Study of the Timaeus-Critias. Cambridge UP, 2004. Pp. Vi + 218. £45. 0521790670. [REVIEW]Jenny Bryan - 2006 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:210-.
  9. Plato’s Natural Philosophy.John Dillon - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):408-411.
  10. Plato’s Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW]John Dillon - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):408 - 411.
  11. Plato's Natural Philosophy. A Study of the Timaeus–Critias. [REVIEW]James G. Lennox - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):57-59.
  12. Plato's Atlantis and the Exploding Planet A. F. Alford: The Atlantis Secret. A Complete Decoding of Plato's Lost Continent . With a Foreword by C. Gill. Pp. VII + 541. Walsall: Eridu Books, 2001. Paper, £18. Isbn: 0-9527994-1-. [REVIEW]Diskin Clay - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (01):56-.
  13. Conflicting Values in Plato’s Crito.Verity Harte - 1999 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 81 (2):117-147.
    My paper has two aims. The first is to challenge the widespread assumption that the personified Laws of Athens, whom Socrates gives voice to during the second half of the _Crito express Socrates' own views. I shall argue that the principles which the Laws espouse not only differ from those which Socrates sets out in his own person within the dialogue, but are in fact in conflict with Socrates' states principles. (edited).
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  14. Atlantis Destroyed.Rodney Castleden - 1998 - Routledge.
    Plato's legend of Atlantis has become notorious among scholars as the absurdest lie in literature. Atlantis Destroyed explores the possibility that the account given by Plato is historically true. Rodney Castleden first considers the location of Atlantis re-examining two suggestions put forward in the early twentieth century; Minoan Crete and Minoan Thera. He outlines the latest research findings on Knossos and Bronze Age Thera, discussing the material culture, trade empire and agricultural system, writing and wall paintings, art, religion and society (...)
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  15. Who’s Who In Plato’s Timaeus-Critias and Why.Laurence Lampert & Christopher Planeaux - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):87 - 125.
    “One, two, three—but where’s the fourth?” When Socrates counts to open the paired dialogues Timaeus-Critias he points to the three who are present, but he points most emphatically to a fourth who is absent—“sick,” Timaeus reports. Who are one, two, and three? But especially who, is the fourth, that ostentatiously absent fourth?
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  16. Interpreting the Timaeus – Critias. Proceedings of the IV Symposium Platonicum. Selected Papers.Tomás Calvo & Luc Brisson (eds.) - 1997 - Sankt Augustin, Germany: Academia Verlag.
  17. La Physiologie Politique du Critias de Platon.J.-F. Pradeau - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (3):317-323.
  18. The Sunken Kingdom the Atlantis Mystery Solved.Peter James - 1995 - Vintage.
    Reviewing previous theories about the site of Plato's city of Atlantis - some fantastic, some rational - this work offers a solution to the mystery that has baffled historians and archaeologists for centuries. That solution lies in the catastrophic destruction of a late-Bronze Age civilization close to the modern Turkish port of Izmir.
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  19. Luc Brisson (tr.): Platon: Timée, Critias. Traduction inédite, introduction et notes. Pp. 438; 7 ills. Paris: Flammarion, 1992. Paper. [REVIEW]R. F. Stalley - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):169-169.
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  20. Atlantis and Plato's Philosophy.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 1981 - Apeiron 15 (2):117 - 128.
    A moral orientation of a historically existing state is superior to an immoral one; but even a moral state or leader cannot be perfectly moral. The republic (or its symbol, ancient athens) is impossible for metaphysical and practical reasons, and it must suffer the same fate as atlantis in this story, i.e., Destruction at the hands of nature.
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  21. Atlantis: Fact or Fiction? [REVIEW]Sinclair Hood - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (1):161-162.
  22. Plato and Politics: The Critias and the Politicus.Christopher Gill - 1979 - Phronesis 24 (2):148 - 167.
  23. Plato's Atlantis Story and the Birth of Fiction.Christopher Gill - 1979 - Philosophy and Literature 3 (1):64-78.
  24. Character, Plot, and Thought in Plato’s Timaeus-Critias. [REVIEW]U. S. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (2):374-375.
    It seems that the Timaeus is independent of the Critias, that the Critias is incomplete, and that the two dialogues are parts of a tetralogy contemplated but not completed by Plato. As Welliver remarks, most commentators have taken these seeming facts to be facts; some have proffered outlines of the supposed tetralogy; some have explained its supposed incompleteness by making Plato old and weary. Welliver believes that the Timaeus-Critias is a complete dramatic work, and most of his book represents an (...)
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  25. Flames Over Atlantis.J. M. Cook - 1970 - The Classical Review 20 (02):224-.
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  26. The Timaeus, and the Critias. Plato - 1945 - [New York]Pantheon Books.
    Among all the writings of Plato the Timaeus is the most obscure to the modern reader, and has nevertheless had the greatest influence over the ancient and mediaeval world. The Critias is a fragment and it was designed to be the second part of a trilogy. Timaeus had brought down the origin of the world to the creation of man, and the dawn of history was now to succeed the philosophy of nature. It tells us about Atlantis and Critias returns (...)
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  27. The Story of Atlantis: Its Purpose and its Moral.R. Hackforth - 1944 - The Classical Review 58 (01):7-9.
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  28. Plato: Timaeus and Critias: Translated Into English with Introductions and Notes on the Text. Plato - 1929 - London: Methuen & Co..
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  29. Platon. Oeuvres complètes, Tome X.: Timèe, Critias. Texte établi et traduit par Albert Rivaud. Pp.cxxiii + 209; xxiii + 42. Paris: Société d'Edition 'Les Belles Lettres,' 1925. 20 frs. [REVIEW]W. R. M. Lamb - 1926 - The Classical Review 40 (02):86-.
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  30. Critias. Plato - unknown
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  31. Truth, Lies and History in Plato's Timaeus-Critias.Thomas Johansen - manuscript
    From antiquity on, the status of Critias' account has been the subject of intense debate. Is the Atlantis story 'real history'? The dialogue invites us to raise this question but also to reflect on its terms. In this paper I shall argue that the story should be seen as 'history' only in a special Platonic sense: it is a story which is fabricated about the past in order to reflect a general truth about how ideal citizens would behave in action.
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