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  1. Socrates's Great Speech: The Defense of Philosophy in Plato's Gorgias.Tushar Irani - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (3):349-369.
    This paper focuses on a neglected portion of Plato’s Gorgias from 506c to 513d during Socrates’s discussion with Callicles. I claim that Callicles adopts the view that virtue lies in self-preservation in this part of the dialogue. Such a position allows him to assert the value of rhetoric in civic life by appealing not to the goodness of acting unjustly with impunity, but to the badness of suffering unjustly without remedy. On this view, the benefits of the life of rhetoric (...)
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  2. ‘The Rhetoric of Medicine: Lessons on Professionalism From Ancient Greece’: Book Review. [REVIEW]Adam Hayden - 2020 - The Polyphony: Conversations Across the Humanities.
  3. The Good-Directedness of Τέχνη and the Status of Rhetoric in the Platonic Dialogues.Emily Hulme Kozey - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (3):223-244.
    Does a τέχνη, qua τέχνη, need to be good-directed? On the basis of the Gorgias, many scholars have thought the answer is yes; I argue here to the contrary. There are, of course, many beneficial τέχναι, such as medicine and weaving; and there are even unconditionally good τέχναι, like the πολιτικὴ τέχνη; but Plato also happily construes piracy as a τέχνη in the Sophist, and, more normally, all sorts of neutral practices as τέχναι. In order to make this argument, I (...)
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  4. Plato's Apology Between Philosophy and Rhetoric - Haraldsen, Pettersson, Wiese Tvedt Readings of Plato's Apology of Socrates. Defending the Philosophical Life. Pp. VIII + 248. Lanham, Boulder, New York and London: Lexington Books, 2018. Cased, £70, Us$100. Isbn: 978-1-4985-4999-8. [REVIEW]Thanassis Samaras - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):51-53.
  5. Plato and the Role of Argument - Irani Plato on the Value of Philosophy. The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus. Pp. XIV + 217. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Cased, £64.99, Us$99.99. Isbn: 978-1-107-18198-4. [REVIEW]Andrew Beer - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):359-361.
  6. Plato on the Value of Philosophy: The Art of Argument in the Gorgias and Phaedrus.Tushar Irani - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato was the first philosopher in the Western tradition to reflect systematically on rhetoric. In this book, Tushar Irani presents a comprehensive and innovative reading of the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, the only two Platonic dialogues to focus on what an art of argument should look like, treating each of the texts individually, yet ultimately demonstrating how each can best be understood in light of the other. For Plato, the way in which we approach argument typically reveals something about our (...)
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  7. The Rhetoric of Plato’s Republic: Democracy and the Philosophical Problem of Persuasion.Andrew Payne - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (2):446-448.
  8. The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman. Moore - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300-322.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of example over their rhetorical appeal to the soul of the learner. Following a small but significant trend in recent rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigmata, following the discussion of example in (...)
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  9. E. Sanday A Study of Dialectic in Plato's Parmenides. Pp. X + 228. Evanston, Il: Northwestern University Press, 2015. Cased, US$79.95. ISBN: 978-0-8101-3007-4. [REVIEW]Mehmet Tabak - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (2):591.
  10. Animal Sacrifice in Plato's Later Methodology.Holly Moore - 2015 - In Jeremy Bell, Michael Naas & Thomas Patrick Oates (eds.), Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts. Indianapolis, IN, USA: pp. 179-192.
    In both the Phaedrus and Statesman dialogues, the dialectician's method of division is likened to the butchery of sacrificial animals. Interpreting the significance of this metaphor by analyzing ancient Greek sacrificial practice, this essay argues that, despite the ubiquity of the method of division in these later dialogues, Plato is there stressing the logical priority of the method of collection, division's dialectical twin. Although Plato prioritizes the method of collection, the author further argues that, through a kind of 'domestication' of (...)
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  11. Peri Ti?: Interrogating Rhetoric's Domain.Megan Foley - 2013 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (2):241-246.
    You, who call yourself a rhetorician, what is your art? With what particular thing is your skill concerned? Weaving is concerned with fabricating fabrics, music with making melodies; rhetorician, with what is your know-how concerned? This is the question that Socrates poses to Gorgias in Plato's notorious refutation of rhetoric: "Peri tēs rhētorikēs, peri ti tōn ontōn estin epistēmē?" (1925, 268). Socrates' question frames rhetoric in the genitive case—which, in this case, specifies the source or origin of one thing from (...)
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  12. Jeff Mitscherling, The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis. [REVIEW]Aaron Landry - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (2):266-270.
  13. Socrates' Refutation of Gorgias: Gorgias 447c-461b.Mark L. McPherran - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:13-29.
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  14. Empeiria Kai Tribē: Plato on the “Art” of Flattery in Rhetoric and Sophistry.Jeremy R. Bell - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):379-394.
    In this essay I trace the terms empeiria and tribē throughout the Platonic corpus in order to expose their central position within Plato’s critique of the sophists and rhetoricians. I find that these two terms—both of which indicate a knack or habitude that has been developed through experiential familiarity with certain causal tendencies—are regularly deployed in order to account for the effectiveness of these speakers even in the absence of a technē; for, what Plato identifies with these terms is the (...)
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  15. The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis. By Jeff Mitscherling.Robin Waterfield - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1034-1035.
  16. Gorgias' Defense: Plato and His Opponents on Rhetoric and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):95-121.
    This paper explores in detail Gorgias' defense of rhetoric in Plato 's Gorgias, noting its connections to earlier and later texts such as Aristophanes' Clouds, Gorgias' Helen, Isocrates' Nicocles and Antidosis, and Aristotle's Rhetoric. The defense as Plato presents it is transparently inadequate; it reveals a deep inconsistency in Gorgias' conception of rhetoric and functions as a satirical precursor to his refutation by Socrates. Yet Gorgias' defense is appropriated, in a streamlined form, by later defenders of rhetoric such as Isocrates (...)
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  17. Socrates and Gorgias.James Doyle - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (1):1-25.
    In this paper I try to solve some problems concerning the interpretation of Socrates' conversation with Gorgias about the nature of rhetoric in Plato's Gorgias (448e6-461b2). I begin by clarifying what, ethically, is at stake in the conversation (section 2). In the main body of the paper (sections 3-6) I address the question of what we are to understand Gorgias as believing about the nature of rhetoric: I criticise accounts given by Charles Kahn and John Cooper, and suggest an alternative (...)
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  18. Christopher Rowe, Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing. [REVIEW]Chloe Balla - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 11:71-75.
    Review of Christopher Rowe, Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007.
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  19. Review of John Holbo, Reason and Persuasion: Three Dialogues by Plato: Euthyphro, Meno, Republic Book I[REVIEW]Paul Carelli - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (12).
  20. Rational Argument in Ancient Rhetoric.Michael de Brauw - 2009 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 3 (1):82-83.
  21. Shame as a Tool for Persuasion in Plato's Gorgias: Plato.Gorgias.D. B. Futter - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):451-461.
    In gorgias, socrates stands accused of argumentative "foul play" involving manipulation by shame. Polus says that Socrates wins the fight with Gorgias by shaming him into the admission that "a rhetorician knows what is right . . . and would teach this to his pupils" . And later, when Polus himself has been "tied up" and "muzzled" , Callicles says that he was refuted only because he was ashamed to reveal his true convictions . These allegations, if justified, directly undermine (...)
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  22. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):525-526.
  23. Alcidamas, Isocrates, and Plato on Speech, Writing, and Philosophical Rhetoric.Marina Berzins Mccoy - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):45-66.
  24. Platonic Myths and Straussian Lies: The Logic of Persuasion.Kenneth Moore - 2009 - Polis 26 (1):89-115.
    This article undertakes to examine the reception of Platonic theories of falsification in the contemporary philosophy of Leo Strauss and his adherents. The aim of the article is to consider the Straussian response to, and interaction with, Platonic ideas concerning deception and persuasion with an emphasis on the arguments found in the Laws. The theme of central interest in this analysis is Plato's development of paramyth in the Laws. Paramyth entails the use of rhetorical language in order to persuade the (...)
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  25. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Richard D. Parry - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 131-132.
    Marina McCoy defends three interrelated claims about the topic mentioned in her title. First, the distinction between philosophy and rhetoric in the dialogues is not as clear as some commentators seem to think. Second, since philosophy as practiced by Socrates includes important rhetorical dimensions, there is no important methodological distinction between philosophy and rhetoric. Third, it is his virtues—and not any particular method—that differentiate Socrates the philosopher from sophists and rhetoricians. McCoy pursues different aspects of her theses through the Apology, (...)
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  26. Once Again the Opening of Plato's Gorgias.David Sansone - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (2):631.
  27. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists (Review).Michael Svoboda - 2009 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (2):pp. 191-196.
  28. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. By Marina McCoy and Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing. By Christopher Rowe: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):511-511.
  29. Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists[REVIEW]Eugene Garver - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (9).
  30. Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry.Charles Griswold - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  31. Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez & Ravi Sharma - 2008 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008 (12.36).
  32. Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's "Symposium".Anne Sheppard - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.
    This paper draws attention to the Symposium's concern with epideictic rhetoric. It argues that in the Symposium, as in the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, a contrast is drawn between true and false rhetoric. The paper also discusses the dialogue's relationship to drama. Whereas both epideictic rhetoric and drama were directed to a mass audience, the speeches in the Symposium are delivered to a small, select group. The discussion focuses on the style of the speeches delivered by Aristophanes, Agathon, Socrates and (...)
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  33. Plato’s Socrates About Poetry and Rhetoric in Ion and Gorgias.U. Wollner - 2008 - Filozofia 63:18-27.
    The main objective of the paper is the analysis of the views of Plato’s Socrates on poetry and rhetoric in Ion and Gorgias. Its first part aims at an examination of the subjects of poetry and rhetoric. In the second part the author gives the definition of Plato’s methodical criteria of recognizing of a discipline as ... . In its the last part the paper tries to decide, whether poetry and rhetoric, according to the founder of the Academy, meet the (...)
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  34. Revisiting the Controversial Nature of Persuasion in Plato's Laws.Eva Buccioni - 2007 - Polis 24 (2):262-283.
    This paper revisits the scholarly controversy about the nature of persuasion in Plato's Laws. So far scholars have identified the nature of this persuasion in often conflicting ways, e.g. from 'lying propaganda' and 'enchantment' to 'sermon preaching' , or even as 'rational persuasion' . Rather than proposing yet another identification, this paper shows that the nature of the persuasion envisioned by the Athenian lawgiver becomes evident once the divergent scholarly views are brought together into one idea. The seed to this (...)
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  35. The Unity of Plato’s Gorgias.Eric Buzzetti - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):884-886.
  36. Desire, Power and the Good in Plato's Gorgias.James Doyle - 2007 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 94 (1):15-36.
  37. Plato's Rhetoric of Indirection: Paradox as Site and Agency of Transformation.Jason Ingram - 2007 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (3):293-310.
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  38. The Sounds of Silence: Rhetoric and Dialectic in the Refutation of Callicles in Plato's Gorgias.Rod Jenks - 2007 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (2):201-215.
  39. Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Marina McCoy - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by the (...)
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  40. The Doctor and the Pastry Chef: Pleasure and Persuasion in Plato’s Gorgias.Jessica Moss - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):229 - 249.
  41. The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis.Jeff Mitscherling - 2006 - Humanity Books.
    This absorbing study of Plato’s criticism of poetry offers a new interpretation based upon central features of both the pre-Platonic conception of poetry and previously neglected features of Plato’s various discussions of poetry and the poets. Professor Mitscherling’s analysis is unique in that he concentrates on the philosophical significance of Plato’s distinction between dramatic and nondramatic sorts of poetry. Mitscherling shows that this distinction proves in fact to be central to the conception of poetry that Plato consistently elaborates throughout his (...)
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  42. Michelini (A.N.) (Ed.) Plato as Author. The Rhetoric of Philosophy. (Cincinnati Classical Studies NS 8.) Pp. Viii + 359. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003. Cased, €40, US$47. ISBN: 90-04-12878-. [REVIEW]Kathryn A. Morgan - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (02):296-.
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  43. Review of Devin Stauffer, The Unity of Plato's Gorgias: Rhetoric, Justice, and the Philosophic Life[REVIEW]Jessica Moss - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (11).
  44. Technē and the Problem of Socratic Philosophy in the Gorgias.David Levy - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (4):185-228.
    In Plato’s Gorgias, Socrates argues that philosophy is superior to rhetoric in part because the former is a techne while the latter is not. I argue that the Socratic practice of philosophy within this dialogue fails to qualify as a techne for exactly the same reasons that rhetoric fails to qualify as a techne. In doing so, I introduce a new kind of Socratic ignorance: methodological ignorance. I reject both Charles Kahn’s account of the relationship between the dialogue’s dramatic and (...)
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  45. Retoryczność platońskiej "Obrony Sokratesa" (Rhetorical analysis of Plato's "Apology of Socrates").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2005 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 3:43-48.
  46. Between Medicine and Rhetoric.Stephen Pender - 2005 - Early Science and Medicine 10 (1):36-64.
    Inspired by Pierre-Jean-Georges Cabanis' claim in 1798 that physicians might learn forms of medical reasoning from les anciens rhéteurs, in this paper I explore intimate associations between medicine and rhetoric over the longue durée. Gravely susceptible to error, medical reasoning relies on signs and examples, both gleaned from experience and both the subject of rhetorical inquiry; like rhetoric, medicine reaches plausible conclusions from probable premises. Here, ranging from Hippocrates and Plato through Aristotle to early modern England, I argue that forms (...)
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  47. Eros, Dialektik Und Rhetorik.Dirk Cürsgen - 2004 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 9 (1):23-49.
    The article analyses the relation between logos and myth in Plato’s philosophy using the Phaidros as a representative example; this includes the investigation of the function of the myth in this dialogue. The palinode proves to be the central unifying element of the Phaidros, and thus the dialogue s core. The second speech of Socrates mediates between the different parts of the Phaidros, its themes, motives and thoughts: for example love, rhetoric, dialectic, forms, different kinds of knowledge and speech or (...)
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  48. [Recensão a] Michael S. Kochin, Gender and Rhetoric in Plato’s Political Thought.Eduardo Mombello - 2004 - Plato Journal 4.
  49. The Chreia and Ancient Rhetoric. Classroom Exercises. [REVIEW]Denis M. Searby, R. F. Hock & E. N. O'Neil - 2004 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:189-190.
  50. Socrates on Persuasion, Truth, and Courtroom Argumentation in Plato’s Apology.Dale Jacquette - 2003 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 22 (4):33-41.
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