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  1. Plato's The Allegory of the Cave.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    The main idea of this allegory is the difference between people who simply experience their sensory experiences, and call that knowledge, and those who understand real knowledge by seeing the truth. The allegory actually digs into some deep philosophy, which is not surprising since it comes from Plato. Its main idea is the discussion of how humans perceive reality and if human existence has a higher truth. It explores the theme of belief versus knowledge. The Perception Plato theorizes that the (...)
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  2. Principal Doctrines of Epicurus.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    Epicurean philosophy, as Epicurus's teachings became known, was used as the basis for how the community lived and worked. At the time, founding a school and teaching a community of students was the main way philosophical ideas were developed and transmitted. Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–322 BCE), for instance, founded a school in Athens called the Lyceum. Epicurus and his disciples believed either there were no gods or, if there were, the gods were so remote from humans that they were not (...)
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  3. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo.Dominic Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95-115.
  4. Play and Moral Education in the Choruses of Plato’s Laws.Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    Among the educative games of Plato’s Cretan city, choral performances have a prominent role. This paper examines the function of play (παιδιά) in the choral education in virtue in Plato’s Laws. I reconstruct the notion of play as it is elaborated throughout this dialogue, and then show how it contributes to solving the problem of virtue acquisition in the Athenian’s account of moral education through songs and dances. I argue that play in the Laws is best understood an imitative activity (...)
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  5. Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):152-169.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
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  6. Plato Und Die Dichter.Harold Cherniss & H. G. Gadamer - 1936 - American Journal of Philology 57 (2):229.
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  7. A History of Esthetics.George Boas, Katharine Everett Gilbert & Helmut Kuhn - 1941 - American Journal of Philology 62 (1):126.
  8. Philosophy and Literature in Plato - (H.) Fossheim, (V.) Songe-Møller, (K.) Ågotnes (Edd.) Philosophy as Drama. Plato's Thinking Through Dialogue. Pp. XIV + 247. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019. Cased, £85, Us$114. Isbn: 978-1-350-08249-6. [REVIEW]Rasmus Sevelsted - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):340-342.
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  9. Plato and Tragedy - (R.S.) Liebert Tragic Pleasure From Homer to Plato. Pp. X + 218. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Cased, £78.99, Us$105. Isbn: 978-1-107-18444-2. [REVIEW]Pierre Destrée - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):337-339.
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  10. How Plato and Hegel Integrate the Sciences, the Arts, Religion, and Philosophy.Robert M. Wallace - 2019 - Hegel Jahrbuch 2019 (1):391-402.
    Plato was among the first to give prominence to the apparent conflicts between philosophy, religion, and the arts, conflicts that are still alive in modern cultures. Philosophers often challenge the legitimacy of religion, in various ways; philosophy as an advocate of ethics challenges the arts as lacking a moral compass; and advocates of the arts and religion stage counterattacks against these challenges. However, Plato wasn’t only a critic of religion and the arts. He had his own preferred version of religion, (...)
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  11. One Man Show: Poetics and Presence in the Iliad and Odyssey.Katherine L. Kretler - 2017 - Washington, DC, USA: Center for Hellenic Studies / Harvard University Press.
    This book plumbs the virtues of the Homeric poems as scripts for solo performance. Despite academic focus on orality and on composition in performance, we have yet to fully appreciate the Iliad and Odyssey as the sophisticated scripts that they are. What is lost in the journey from the stage to the page? -/- Readers may be readily impressed by the vividness of the poems, but they may miss out on the strange presence or uncanniness that the performer evoked in (...)
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  12. El debate sobre Plato und die Dichter y su inscripción en el contexto de Alemania Nacional-Socialista: una discusión con lecturas de la teoría política.Facundo Bey - 2019 - Ekstasis: Revista de Hermenéutica y Fenomenologí 8 (1):138-163.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer, en su conferencia Plato und die Dichter (1934), desarrolló una investigación fenomenológica excepcional de filosofía ético-política de Platón y del lugar que el arte ocupa en ella. En mediados de la década de 1990, la escritora mexicana Teresa Orozco publicó una serie de escritos en los cuales acusa a Gadamer de haberse colocado, a través de la exhibición y publicación de este trabajo, a servicio del nacional-socialismo. Este artículo busca discutir los argumentos presentados por Orozco y otros autores, (...)
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  13. An Aesthetic Theory in Four Dimensions.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2019 - Dialogue and Universalism 29 (2):53-64.
    The purpose of this article is to synthesize four major elements of aesthetic experience that have previously appeared isolated whenever an attempt at conceptualization is made. These four elements are: Immanuel Kant’s disinterested pleasure, Robin G. Collingwood’s emotional expressionism, the present writer’s redemptive emotional experience, and, lastly, Plato’s concept of Beauty. By taking these four abstracted elements as the bedrock for genuine aesthetic experience, this article aims to clarify the proper role of art as distinct from philosophy and intellectualization. Rather (...)
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  14. James A. Arieti: Interpreting Plato: The Dialogues as Drama. Pp. X+270. Savage, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 1991. $46.25. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):455-456.
  15. On Poietic Remembering and Forgetting: Hermeneutic Recollection and Diotima’s Historico-Hermeneutic Leanings.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2018 - Symposium 22 (2):107-134.
    Like human existence itself, our enduring legacies—whether poetic, ethical, political, or philosophical—continually unfold and require recurrent communal engagement and (re)enactment. In other words, an ongoing performance of significant works must occur, and this task requires the collective human activity of re-membering or gathering-together-again. In the Symposium, Diotima provides an account of human pursuits of immortality through the creation of artifacts, including laws, poems, and philosophical discourses that resonates with Gadamer’s account of our engagement with artworks and texts. This essay explores (...)
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  16. Is Good Tragedy Possible? The Argument of Plato's Gorgias 502b-503b.Franco V. Trivigno - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:115-138.
  17. Republic 10 and the Role of the Audience in Art.Verity Harte - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 38:69-96.
  18. Der Mimesisbegriff in der Griechischen Antike: Neubetrachtung Eines Umstrittenen Begriffes Als Ansatz Zu Einer Neuen Interpretation der Platonischen Kunstauffassung. [REVIEW]Stephen Halliwell - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (1):176-177.
  19. Philosophical Essays Presented to John Watson. [REVIEW]R. Hackforth - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (1-2):26-27.
  20. The Origins of Western IdeasThe Nature of Love: Plato to Luther. [REVIEW]John C. Moore & Irving Singer - 1968 - Journal of the History of Ideas 29 (1):141.
  21. Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32-44.
    “Sorcerer Love” is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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  22. Apprendre À L’'Ge Adulte : Entre Imitation Et émancipationLearning: Between Imitation and Emancipation'.Henri Vieille-Grosjean & Gabriel Di Patrizio - 2015 - Revue Phronesis 4 (1):40.
  23. 29. The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato Banished the Artists.Iris Murdoch - 2016 - In Bernard Williams (ed.), Essays and Reviews: 1959-2002. Princeton University Press. pp. 142-145.
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  24. The Fire and the Sun Why Plato Banished the Artists : Based Upon the Romanes Lecture 1976.Iris Murdoch - 1990
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  25. Plato's Quarrel with Poetry: Simonides.H. S. Thayer - 1975 - Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (1):3.
  26. Plato and the Poets.John A. Mourant - 1950 - The Thomist 13:249.
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  27. The Aesthetic Element in Morality. [REVIEW]Rudolf Eucken - 1892 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 3:650.
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  28. Truth's Harmony in Plato's Musical Cosmos.Douglas V. Henry - 1996 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    Plato provocatively characterizes truth $$ in terms of harmony $$ at various points throughout his dialogues. While limited attention has been directed toward the role of musical concepts in Plato's general cosmology, not any attention has been directed toward how musical concepts function in relation to Plato's characterization of truth. In fact, this issue has had little occasion for consideration. Almost every contemporary translator empties terms such as $\grave\alpha\rho\mu o\nu\acute\iota\alpha,$ when co-incidental with $\acute\alpha\lambda\acute\eta\theta\varepsilon\iota\alpha,$ of their musical content. As a consequence, (...)
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  29. Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts.Julius Moravscik & Philip Temko - 1984 - Mind 93 (370):296-296.
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  30. "Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts", Edited by J. Moravcsik and P. Temko. [REVIEW]W. Charlton - 1984 - Mind 93:296.
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  31. Ti to Kalliston.Chrestos I. Karouzos - 1957 - [S.N.].
  32. By Uniting It Stands: Poetry and Myth in Plato’s Republic.Andreas Avgousti - 2012 - Polis 29 (1):21-41.
    This article argues against readings that tend to overlook, dismiss or reduce the profound role of poetry and myth in Plato’s Republic. It discusses and rejects the distinction between myth and poetry that we find in such readings. Then it makes the case for the irreducibility of poetry. Crucially, poetry determines both the state and the frame of mind of the dialogue’s interlocutors, and we can expect it to do the same for the Kallipoleans. The attraction of the irrational part (...)
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  33. Writing Law. [REVIEW]Robin Osborne - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):87-88.
  34. Julius Moravscik and Philip Temko, Eds., Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts Reviewed By.Jeff Mitscherling - 1984 - Philosophy in Review 4 (5):206-209.
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  35. Poetry, Philosophy and Truth: Seeking Aletheia in Plato.Joanne B. Waugh - 2001 - In Konstantine Boudouris (ed.), Greek Philosophy and Epistemology. International Association for Greek Philosophy. pp. 188--203.
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  36. Plato on Mimesis.P. Woodruff - 1998 - In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 521--23.
  37. The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato Banished the Artists.Rosamond Kent Sprague - 1977 - Philosophical Books 18 (3):105-106.
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  38. The Man-Eating Horses of Diomedes in Poetry and Painting.Donna C. Kurtz - 1975 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 95:171-172.
  39. The Earliest Narrative Poetry of Rome.Ethel Mary Steuart - 1921 - Classical Quarterly 15 (1):31-37.
    Despite the discredit into which the once famous theory of Niebuhr has long sincefallen, it is beginning to appear, both to historians and to students of literature, that Epic poetry was in full process of evolution at Rome before Livius Andronicus was inspired to translate the Odyssey. There is, indeed, ample evidence to warrant such a belief; our authorities may most conveniently be considered in two main divisions. The first calls for no more than the barest mention, for it is (...)
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  40. Plato and Freud: Two Theories of Love. [REVIEW]Donald C. Abel - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):193-196.
  41. The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis. By Jeff Mitscherling.Robin Waterfield - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1034-1035.
  42. Plato and the Arts Julius Moravcsik, Philip Temko (Edd.): Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts. (American Philosophical Quarterly Library of Philosophy.) Pp. X+150. Totowa, New Jersey: Rowan & Littlefield, 1982. $27.50. [REVIEW]John Glucker - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (02):210-213.
  43. Deceptive Readings: Poetry and its Value Reconsidered.Sitta von Reden - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):30-.
    In his analysis of the social and economic conditions of intellectual activity in ancient Greece, Gentili argues that the value of poetry underwent a notable change in the late archaic period. Poetry came to be produced within a contractual relationship between patrons and poets, it became a commercial good available to the one who could pay for it and its value was expressed no longer by honouring the poet but by paying for his product. At the time of Solon and (...)
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  44. Perspectives in Aesthetics, Plato to Camus.Peyton E. Richter - 1967 - New York: Odyssey Press.
  45. Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics, From Plato to Wittgenstein.Frank A. Tillman - 1969 - New York: Harper & Row.
  46. Book Review: Literature Against Philosophy, Plato to Derrida: A Defense of Poetry. [REVIEW]Mark Edmundson - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (2).
  47. Collingwood and Greek Aesthetics.Stanley H. Rosen - 1959 - Phronesis 4 (2):135-148.
  48. The Aesthetic Character of Form. Review of "Provocative Form in Plato, Kant, Nietzsche (and Others)" by Bernard Freydberg. [REVIEW]Eric Sanday - 2003 - Research in Phenomenology 33 (1):328-334.
  49. Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's "Symposium".Anne Sheppard - 2008 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.
    This paper draws attention to the Symposium's concern with epideictic rhetoric. It argues that in the Symposium, as in the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, a contrast is drawn between true and false rhetoric. The paper also discusses the dialogue's relationship to drama. Whereas both epideictic rhetoric and drama were directed to a mass audience, the speeches in the Symposium are delivered to a small, select group. The discussion focuses on the style of the speeches delivered by Aristophanes, Agathon, Socrates and (...)
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  50. Plato and Pater: Fin-de-Siécle Aesthetics.I. C. Small - 1972 - British Journal of Aesthetics 12 (4):369-383.
1 — 50 / 383