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  1. An Inivitation to Think: Three Entangled Problems in Plato's Sophist [Een uitnodiging tot denken: Plato's Sofist als kluwen van problemen].Martijn Boven - 2023 - Wijsgerig Perspectief 63 (4):6-15.
    -/- In Plato's work the "Sophist", Socrates, who typically occupies a central position in Plato's dialogues, is assigned a supporting role. This has led some scholars to argue for a shift in Plato's oeuvre, where he distances himself from Socrates and introduces a new main protagonist. However, this new protagonist remains unnamed and is only identified by his social position as Xenos, indicating that he is an outsider and a stranger whose identity is ambiguous. In this article, I argue that (...)
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  2. Platon'un Estetiği.Nickolas Pappas - 2023 - Öncül Analitik Felsefe. Translated by Gökdemir İhsan.
    Eğer estetik, sanat ve güzelliğe dair felsefi bir soruşturmaysa (veya güzelliğin –örneğin “estetik değer” gibi– güncel bir karşılığıysa), Platon’un diyaloglarının çarpıcı özelliği, her iki konuya da eşit zaman ayırması ama yine de onlara karşıtlarmış gibi muamele etmesidir. Güzellik en iyiye yakınken, çoğunlukla şiirle temsil edilen sanat, Platon’un bahsettiği herhangi bir fenomenden daha büyük bir tehlikeye yakındır. Peki, her iki pozisyonu da içeren “Platon’un estetiği” diye bir şey olabilir mi?
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  3. Acerca da multiplicidade de belezas no Banquete de Platão.Beatriz Saar - 2022 - Polymatheia 15 (2):26-40.
    O objetivo deste artigo é defender uma leitura “inclusiva” da Scala Amoris (210a-212b) presente no Banquete de Platão, na qual o amante, em sua ascensão, incorpora um número cada vez maior de objetos belos em sua esfera de preocupação erótica. Neste sentido, posiciono-me de forma contrária à leitura “exclusiva”, na qual tal ascensão implicaria o abandono do que fora anteriormente desejado.
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  4. Plato's The Allegory of the Cave.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    The main idea of this allegory is the difference between people who simply experience their sensory experiences, and call that knowledge, and those who understand real knowledge by seeing the truth. The allegory actually digs into some deep philosophy, which is not surprising since it comes from Plato. Its main idea is the discussion of how humans perceive reality and if human existence has a higher truth. It explores the theme of belief versus knowledge. The Perception Plato theorizes that the (...)
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  5. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo.Dominic Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95-115.
    This paper aims to achieve a better understanding of what Socrates means by “sumfvne›n” in the sections of the Phaedo in which he uses the word, and how its use contributes both to the articulation of the hypothetical method and the proof of the soul’s immortality. Section I sets out the well-known problems for the most obvious readings of the relation, while Sections II and III argue against two remedies for these problems, the first an interpretation of what the sumfvne› (...)
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  6. Play and Moral Education in the Choruses of Plato’s Laws.Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    Among the educative games of Plato’s Cretan city, choral performances have a prominent role. This paper examines the function of play (παιδιά) in the choral education in virtue in Plato’s Laws. I reconstruct the notion of play as it is elaborated throughout this dialogue, and then show how it contributes to solving the problem of virtue acquisition in the Athenian’s account of moral education through songs and dances. I argue that play in the Laws is best understood an imitative activity (...)
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  7. Plato and the dangerous pleasures of poikilia.Jonathan Fine - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):152-169.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to redirect admiration toward (...)
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  8. Plato und die Dichter.Harold Cherniss & H. G. Gadamer - 1936 - American Journal of Philology 57 (2):229.
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  9. A History of Esthetics.George Boas, Katharine Everett Gilbert & Helmut Kuhn - 1941 - American Journal of Philology 62 (1):126.
  10. Philosophy and literature in Plato - (h.) fossheim, (V.) songe-møller, (k.) ågotnes (edd.) Philosophy as drama. Plato's thinking through dialogue. Pp. XIV + 247. London and new York: Bloomsbury academic, 2019. Cased, £85, us$114. Isbn: 978-1-350-08249-6. [REVIEW]Rasmus Sevelsted - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):340-342.
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  11. Plato and tragedy - (r.S.) Liebert tragic pleasure from Homer to Plato. Pp. X + 218. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2017. Cased, £78.99, us$105. Isbn: 978-1-107-18444-2. [REVIEW]Pierre Destrée - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):337-339.
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  12. How Plato and Hegel Integrate the Sciences, the Arts, Religion, and Philosophy.Robert M. Wallace - 2019 - Hegel Jahrbuch 2019 (1):391-402.
  13. One Man Show: Poetics and Presence in the Iliad and Odyssey.Katherine Kretler - 2017 - Washington, DC, USA: Center for Hellenic Studies / Harvard University Press.
    This book plumbs the virtues of the Homeric poems as scripts for solo performance. Despite academic focus on orality and on composition in performance, we have yet to fully appreciate the Iliad and Odyssey as the sophisticated scripts that they are. What is lost in the journey from the stage to the page? -/- Readers may be readily impressed by the vividness of the poems, but they may miss out on the strange presence or uncanniness that the performer evoked in (...)
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  14. The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed.David Ebrey & Richard Kraut (eds.) - 2022 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Contributors in the order of contributions: David Ebrey, Richard Kraut, T. H. Irwin, Leonard Brandwood, Eric Brown, Agnes Callard, Gail Fine, Suzanne Obdrzalek, Gábor Betegh, Elizabeth Asmis, Henry Mendell, Constance C. Meinwald, Michael Frede, Emily Fletcher, Verity Harte, Rachana Kamtekar, and Rachel Singpurwalla. -/- The first edition of the Cambridge Companion to Plato (1992), edited by Richard Kraut, shaped scholarly research and guided new students for thirty years. This new edition introduces students to fresh approaches to Platonic dialogues while advancing (...)
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  15. El debate sobre Plato und die Dichter y su inscripción en el contexto de Alemania Nacional-Socialista: una discusión con lecturas de la teoría política.Facundo Bey - 2019 - Ekstasis: Revista de Hermenéutica y Fenomenologí 8 (1):138-163.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer, en su conferencia Plato und die Dichter (1934), desarrolló una investigación fenomenológica excepcional de filosofía ético-política de Platón y del lugar que el arte ocupa en ella. En mediados de la década de 1990, la escritora mexicana Teresa Orozco publicó una serie de escritos en los cuales acusa a Gadamer de haberse colocado, a través de la exhibición y publicación de este trabajo, a servicio del nacional-socialismo. Este artículo busca discutir los argumentos presentados por Orozco y otros autores, (...)
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  16. An Aesthetic Theory in Four Dimensions.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2019 - Dialogue and Universalism 29 (2):53-64.
    The purpose of this article is to synthesize four major elements of aesthetic experience that have previously appeared isolated whenever an attempt at conceptualization is made. These four elements are: Immanuel Kant’s disinterested pleasure, Robin G. Collingwood’s emotional expressionism, the present writer’s redemptive emotional experience, and, lastly, Plato’s concept of Beauty. By taking these four abstracted elements as the bedrock for genuine aesthetic experience, this article aims to clarify the proper role of art as distinct from philosophy and intellectualization. Rather (...)
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  17. James A. Arieti: Interpreting Plato: the Dialogues as Drama. Pp. x+270. Savage, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 1991. $46.25. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):455-456.
  18. Craft and Fineness in Plato's Ion.Christopher Janaway - 1992 - In Julia Annas (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume X: 1992. Clarendon Press. pp. 1-23.
    The article argues for the following interpretation of Plato's dialogue Ion. (1) the dialogue is designed primarily to refute Ion's claims to knowledge in his discourse about Homer—i.e. in his role as critic or eulogist of Homer; (2) as regards the rhapsode as performer and as regards the poet, it is especially the fineness of their output that cannot be explained by way of techne; and (3) Plato genuinely assumes the existence of poetic and rhapsodic technai. Points (2) and (3) (...)
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  19. On Poietic Remembering and Forgetting: Hermeneutic Recollection and Diotima’s Historico-Hermeneutic Leanings.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2018 - Symposium 22 (2):107-134.
    Like human existence itself, our enduring legacies—whether poetic, ethical, political, or philosophical—continually unfold and require recurrent communal engagement and (re)enactment. In other words, an ongoing performance of significant works must occur, and this task requires the collective human activity of re-membering or gathering-together-again. In the Symposium, Diotima provides an account of human pursuits of immortality through the creation of artifacts, including laws, poems, and philosophical discourses that resonates with Gadamer’s account of our engagement with artworks and texts. This essay explores (...)
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  20. Is Good Tragedy Possible? The Argument of Plato's Gorgias 502b-503b.Franco V. Trivigno - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:115-138.
  21. Republic 10 and the Role of the Audience in Art.Verity Harte - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 38:69-96.
  22. Der Mimesisbegriff in der Griechischen Antike: Neubetrachtung eines Umstrittenen Begriffes als Ansatz zu einer Neuen Interpretation der Platonischen Kunstauffassung. [REVIEW]Stephen Halliwell - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (1):176-177.
  23. Philosophical Essays Presented to John Watson. [REVIEW]R. Hackforth - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (1-2):26-27.
  24. The Origins of Western IdeasThe Nature of Love: Plato to Luther. [REVIEW]John C. Moore & Irving Singer - 1968 - Journal of the History of Ideas 29 (1):141.
  25. Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32-44.
    “Sorcerer Love” is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
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  26. Apprendre à l’'ge adulte : entre imitation et émancipationLearning: between imitation and emancipation'.Henri Vieille-Grosjean & Gabriel Di Patrizio - 2015 - Revue Phronesis 4 (1):40-50.
    The process learning for adults training joins in a space/time which can be considered as « communicative action ». Learning is for us a part of a space of sense referred to the notion of passage and thus process. It is well known today that one of its modalities, for adults as for children, leans on the imitation. On the other hand, the game of the interactions makes that the learnings are not passed on without an autonomous and mediate renegotiation (...)
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  27. 29. The Fire and the Sun: Why Plato Banished the Artists.Iris Murdoch - 2016 - In Bernard Williams (ed.), Essays and Reviews: 1959-2002. Princeton University Press. pp. 142-145.
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  28. The Fire and the Sun Why Plato Banished the Artists : Based Upon the Romanes Lecture 1976.Iris Murdoch - 1990
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  29. Plato's Quarrel with Poetry: Simonides.H. S. Thayer - 1975 - Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (1):3.
  30. Plato and the Poets.John A. Mourant - 1950 - The Thomist 13:249.
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  31. The Aesthetic Element in Morality. [REVIEW]Rudolf Eucken - 1892 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 3:650.
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  32. Truth's Harmony in Plato's Musical Cosmos.Douglas V. Henry - 1996 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    Plato provocatively characterizes truth $$ in terms of harmony $$ at various points throughout his dialogues. While limited attention has been directed toward the role of musical concepts in Plato's general cosmology, not any attention has been directed toward how musical concepts function in relation to Plato's characterization of truth. In fact, this issue has had little occasion for consideration. Almost every contemporary translator empties terms such as $\grave\alpha\rho\mu o\nu\acute\iota\alpha,$ when co-incidental with $\acute\alpha\lambda\acute\eta\theta\varepsilon\iota\alpha,$ of their musical content. As a consequence, (...)
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  33. Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts.Julius Moravscik & Philip Temko - 1984 - Mind 93 (370):296-296.
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  34. "Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts", Edited by J. Moravcsik and P. Temko. [REVIEW]W. Charlton - 1984 - Mind 93:296.
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  35. Ti to Kalliston.Chrestos I. Karouzos - 1957 - [S.N.].
  36. By Uniting It Stands: Poetry and Myth in Plato’s Republic.Andreas Avgousti - 2012 - Polis 29 (1):21-41.
    This article argues against readings that tend to overlook, dismiss or reduce the profound role of poetry and myth in Plato’s Republic. It discusses and rejects the distinction between myth and poetry that we find in such readings. Then it makes the case for the irreducibility of poetry. Crucially, poetry determines both the state and the frame of mind of the dialogue’s interlocutors, and we can expect it to do the same for the Kallipoleans. The attraction of the irrational part (...)
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  37. Writing Law. [REVIEW]Robin Osborne - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (1):87-88.
  38. Julius Moravscik and Philip Temko, eds., Plato on Beauty, Wisdom, and the Arts Reviewed by.Jeff Mitscherling - 1984 - Philosophy in Review 4 (5):206-209.
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  39. Poetry, Philosophy and Truth: Seeking Aletheia in Plato.Joanne B. Waugh - 2001 - In Konstantine Boudouris (ed.), Greek Philosophy and Epistemology. International Association for Greek Philosophy. pp. 188--203.
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  40. Plato on Mimesis.P. Woodruff - 1998 - In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 521--23.
  41. The fire and the sun: Why Plato banished the artists.Rosamond Kent Sprague - 1977 - Philosophical Books 18 (3):105-106.
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  42. The man-eating horses of Diomedes in Poetry and Painting.Donna C. Kurtz - 1975 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 95:171-172.
  43. The Earliest Narrative Poetry of Rome.Ethel Mary Steuart - 1921 - Classical Quarterly 15 (1):31-37.
    Despite the discredit into which the once famous theory of Niebuhr has long sincefallen, it is beginning to appear, both to historians and to students of literature, that Epic poetry was in full process of evolution at Rome before Livius Andronicus was inspired to translate the Odyssey. There is, indeed, ample evidence to warrant such a belief; our authorities may most conveniently be considered in two main divisions. The first calls for no more than the barest mention, for it is (...)
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  44. Plato and Freud: Two Theories of Love. [REVIEW]Donald C. Abel - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):193-196.
  45. The Image of a Second Sun: Plato on Poetry, Rhetoric, and the Technē of Mimēsis. By Jeff Mitscherling.Robin Waterfield - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1034-1035.
  46. Plato and the Arts Julius Moravcsik, Philip Temko (edd.): Plato on Beauty, Wisdom and the Arts. (American Philosophical Quarterly Library of Philosophy.) Pp. x+150. Totowa, New Jersey: Rowan & Littlefield, 1982. $27.50. [REVIEW]John Glucker - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (02):210-213.
  47. Deceptive readings: poetry and its value reconsidered.Sitta von Reden - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):30-.
    In his analysis of the social and economic conditions of intellectual activity in ancient Greece, Gentili argues that the value of poetry underwent a notable change in the late archaic period. Poetry came to be produced within a contractual relationship between patrons and poets, it became a commercial good available to the one who could pay for it and its value was expressed no longer by honouring the poet but by paying for his product. At the time of Solon and (...)
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  48. Perspectives in aesthetics, Plato to Camus.Peyton E. Richter - 1967 - New York,: Odyssey Press.
  49. Philosophy of art and aesthetics, from Plato to Wittgenstein.Frank A. Tillman - 1969 - New York,: Harper & Row. Edited by Steven M. Cahn.
  50. Anesthesia: A Brief Reflection on Contemporary Aesthetics.Tripp York - 2008 - Seaburn Press.
    Amidst competing claims of beauty, truth and goodness, Trajan, a young man named after a once celebrated Roman Emperor, attempts to decipher why it is that Kant is wrong, love is capricious, and why you should never take advice from a puppet.
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