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  1. Aristotle on Similarity, Pleasure, and the Justification of our Choices of Friends.Vakirtzis Andreas - manuscript
  2. J.s. Mill's test for higher pleasure.Troy Booher - manuscript
    of (from Studies in the History of Ethics).
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  3. A Comparison Of Plato's And Aristotle's Views On The Nature Of Pleasure.Angela Kind - unknown - Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 21.
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  4. Does Schopenhauer accept any positive pleasures?Joshua Isaac Fox - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    Schopenhauer repeatedly claims that all pleasure is negative, and this view seems to play key roles throughout his work. Nonetheless, many scholars have argued that Schopenhauer actually acknowledges certain positive pleasures. Two major arguments have been offered for this reading, one focused on the link between Schopenhauer's view of pleasure and Plato's, and one focused on Schopenhauer's distinction between two components of aesthetic pleasure. I argue that neither way of motivating the positive pleasure reading succeeds. Both overlook a key aspect (...)
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  5. Pleasure and Pain in Classical Antiquity.William V. Harris (ed.) - forthcoming
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  6. Can Cynics Possess Cakes and Enjoy Them Too? Comments on G.M. Trujillo, Jr.’s “Possessed: The Cynics on Wealth and Pleasure". [REVIEW]Karl Aho - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (2):1-4.
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  7. The standard interpretation of Schopenhauer's compensation argument for pessimism: A nonstandard variant.David Bather Woods - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):961-976.
    According to Schopenhauer’s compensation argument for pessimism, the non-existence of the world is preferable to its existence because no goods can ever compensate for the mere existence of evil. Standard interpretations take this argument to be based on Schopenhauer’s thesis that all goods are merely the negation of evils, from which they assume it follows that the apparent goods in life are in fact empty and without value. This article develops a non-standard variant of the standard interpretation, which accepts the (...)
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  8. The Pleasure Thesis in the Eudemian Ethics.Giulia Bonasio - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (4):521-536.
    Abstractabstract:This paper argues that in the Eudemian Ethics (EE), Aristotle aims to prove the Pleasure Thesis (PT). According to the Pleasure Thesis, happiness is the most pleasant thing of all. Through a reconstruction of the argument in favor of PT, this paper shows that happiness is most pleasant for three reasons: (1) it is pleasant by definition; (2) it is constituted by the most pleasant activities (virtuous actions and contemplation); (3) it is pleasant by nature. A reconstruction of the argument (...)
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  9. Pleasure as a Necessary Component of Kantian Emotions.Uri Eran - 2022 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 39 (4):355-371.
    After three decades of concentrated effort, commentators still seem to disagree about Kant's understanding of the nature of emotions. I argue that the appearance is misleading because the disagreement depends on different assumptions that are independent of Kant. I then propose a way out of this deadlock by pointing to the fact that, although the Kantian phenomena commonly understood as emotions originate in two different faculties, they all involve pleasure. This account provides the necessary yet insufficient conditions on a Kantian (...)
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  10. Pleasure, Judgment and the Function of the Painter-Scribe Analogy.Emily Fletcher - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (2):199-238.
    This paper puts forward a new interpretation of the argument at Philebus 36c–40d that pleasures can be false. Protarchus raises an objection at 37e–38a, and in response Socrates presents the elaborate painter-scribe analogy. Most previous interpretations do not explain how the analogy answers Protarchus’ objection. On my account, Protarchus’ objection relies on the plausible intuition that pleasure is simply not in the business of assessing the world, and so it cannot be charged with doing so incorrectly. Socrates responds by demonstrating (...)
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  11. Two kinds of pleasure (and pain) in Aristotle's ethics.Dorothea Frede - 2022 - In Giulio Di Basilio (ed.), Investigating the Relationship Between Aristotle's Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics. Issues in Ancient Philosophy.
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  12. Aristotle on How Pleasure Perfects Activity (Nicomachean Ethics x.5 1175a29-b14): The Optimising-View.David Machek - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (3):448-467.
    This article offers a new interpretation of Aristotle’s ambiguous and much-discussed claim that pleasure perfects activity. This interpretation provides an alternative to the two main competing readings of this claim in the scholarship: the addition-view, which envisages the perfection conferred by pleasure as an extra perfection beyond the perfection of activity itself; and the identity-view, according to which pleasure just is the perfect activity itself. The proposed interpretation departs from both these views in rejecting their assumption that pleasure cannot perfect (...)
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  13. Lives of Pleasure: A Comparative Essay on Cārvāka and Epicurean Ethics.Christopher Paone - 2022 - Philosophy East and West 72 (4):1023-1044.
    A long-lived and lively tradition of materialist philosophers flourished in classical India and in classical Greece. Due to the condition of their texts, however, they do not often receive close study. This essay compares the views of the classical Indian materialists, the Cārvākas, and the classical Greek materialists, the Epicureans. The first section introduces their philosophies. The second outlines their doctrines of empiricism and materialism. The third and fourth turn to two comparative topics in Cārvāka and Epicurean ethics: their views (...)
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  14. Dimensions of Pleasure: A first Detailed Reconstruction of Plato’s ‘Tyrant Number’.Christoph Poetsch - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (3):391-416.
    In book IX of the Republic, Socrates offers a strange mathematical calculation, which claims to prove that the tyrant lives exactly 729 times less pleasantly than the king. For the first time, a complete and detailed reconstruction of this difficult text and its underlying structure is offered in the present article. It thereby proves that the distinction between ‘pleasure’ and the ‘image of pleasure’ is one among the keys to understanding the passage. It is furthermore shown how the whole calculation (...)
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  15. Possessed: The Cynics on Wealth and Pleasure.G. M. Trujillo - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (1):17-29.
    Aristotle argued that you need some wealth to live well. The Stoics argued that you could live well with or without wealth. But the Cynics argued that wealth is a hinderance. For the Cynics, a good life consists in self-sufficiency, or being able to rule and help yourself. You accomplish this by living simply and naturally, and by subjecting yourself to rigorous philosophical exercises. Cynics confronted people to get them to abandon extraneous possessions and positions of power to live better. (...)
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  16. Memory, anticipation, pleasure.James Warren - 2022 - In Margaret Hampson & Fiona Leigh (eds.), Psychology and Value in Plato, Aristotle, and Hellenistic Philosophy. Oxford: OUP. pp. 141-69.
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  17. Pleasure and pain in the Eudeamian and Nicomachean definitions of moral virtue.Marco Zingano - 2022 - In Giulio Di Basilio (ed.), Investigating the Relationship Between Aristotle's Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics. Issues in Ancient Philosophy.
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  18. The Relationship between Pleasure and Happiness from the Point of View of Ibn Sina and Mulla Sadra.Zahra Ganjipour, Farajullah Barati & Meysam Amani - 2021 - Philosophical Investigations 15 (35):268-292.
    From the time human beings are born, they are forever confronted with the phenomena of pleasure and happiness. These two concepts are very close but there are major differences and that is that pleasure is also used in momentary cases, and happiness is used only for lasting or relatively lasting pleasures. Ibn Sina and Mulla Sadra completely separated these two concepts and provided separate definitions for them. There is a deep relationship between pleasure and happiness. Psychology has a direct effect (...)
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  19. Aquinas, Sense Pleasure, and the State of Grace.O. P. Maria Suso Rispoli - 2021 - New Blackfriars 102 (1100):459-471.
    New Blackfriars, Volume 102, Issue 1100, Page 459-471, July 2021.
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  20. Leibniz on Intellectual Pleasure, Perception of Perfection, and Power.Saja Parvizian - 2021 - Theoria 87 (3):600-627.
    Leibniz is unclear about the nature of pleasure. In some texts, he describes pleasure as a perception of perfection, while in other texts he describes pleasure as being caused by a perception of perfection. In this article, I disambiguate two senses of “perception of perfection”, which clarifies Leibniz’s considered position. I argue that pleasure is a perception of an increase in a substance’s power which is caused by a substance’s knowledge of a perfection of the universe or God. This reading (...)
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  21. The Place of Flawed Pleasures in a Good Life. A Discussion of Plato’s Philebus.Jan Szaif - 2021 - Plato Journal 22.
    The Philebus describes the “good” that enables human eudaimonia as a “mixture” in which cognitive states have to be combined with certain types of pleasure. This essay investigates how the various senses of falsehood that Plato distinguishes are applied to the question of the hedonic “ingredients” of the good. It argues that his theory allows for the inclusion of certain virtuous pleasures that are deficient with respect to truth: either qua “mixed pleasures” lacking in truth on account of the compresence (...)
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  22. Epicurus, Pleasure, and the Twenty-First-Century Diet.Sarah Worth & Ben Davids - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 55 (3):59-70.
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  23. Kant on Pleasure in the Good.Nick Zangwill - 2021 - Disputatio 13 (62):181-188.
    I analyze and defend Kant’s claim in the Critique of the Power of Judgement that pleasure in the good is interested.
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  24. Anticipatory Pleasure and False Pleasure: Philebus 36c-41a. 전헌상 - 2021 - Journal of the Society of Philosophical Studies 135:1-29.
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  25. A Comparative Study of Pleasure in Thomas Aquinas and Mulla Sadra’s theories of Happiness.Mohammad Javad Banisaeed - Javad Miri - Amir Abbas Alizamani - 2020 - Metafizika:97-113.
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  26. The Chinese Pleasure Book by Michael Nylan.Jeffery Lambert - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (4):1-5.
    In this vast and ambitious tome, Michael Nylan aims to "trace the evolution of pleasure theories in early China over the course of a millennium and a half", roughly from 400 BCE to 1100 CE. This involves dissecting the discourse surrounding a single graph, le 樂, which Nylan translates as pleasure, and actively distinguishes from other states such as happiness and joy. Nylan understands such pleasure as "deeper satisfactions" realized in long-term commitments and often relational in nature. In texts, pleasure (...)
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  27. What is Pleasure? The Relation Between the Two Definitions of Pleasure Given by Aristotle in his Nicomachean Ethics.Adrian Alexander Lawrence - 2020 - Alpha Omega 23 (3):483-499.
    This article discusses the nature of “pleasure” in Aristotle. It is an attempt to reconcile and integrate the two different definitions that Aristotle gives in 1153a12–15 and 1174b31–33 of his Nichomachean Ethics. It exams the analysis and proposals of three contemporary philosophers: G.E.L. Owen, David Bostock, and Michael Pakaluk. It then passes to the exegesis of the medieval Thomas Aquinas. Thomas’s reading of the texts is presented as a way to answer the difficulties brought up earlier and provide a solid (...)
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  28. Power, Pleasure, and Profit: Insatiable Appetites from Machiavelli to Madison: by David Wootton, Cambridge, MA, Belknap Press/harvard University Press, 2018, 400 pp., £25.95/€31.50.K. Steven Vincent - 2020 - The European Legacy 26 (7-8):876-878.
    David Wootton has written an engaging book about the emergence of the theory that all human action is self-interested and that believes societies should be structured in ways that satisfy our “insa...
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  29. True Pleasure and its Measure in Plato’s Philebus. 이종환 - 2020 - Cheolhak-Korean Journal of Philosophy 144:1-30.
    이 글은 『필레보스』에서 소크라테스가 나누는 즐거움의 종류가 대상의 존재론적 지위에 달려있기 때문에 오직 순수한 대상에 대한 즐거움만이 참된 즐거움이라는 기존의 해석을 비판적으로 검토하고 즐거움의 종류를 새롭게 구분하는 방법을 제안한다.『필레보스』의 소크라테스는 즐거움이라는 사태가 몸과 혼 모두 혹은 혼에만 작용하는 것이라고 보기 때문에, 극단적인 쾌락주의자의 입장을 비판하면서 즐거움이라는 경험에 있어서 판단이 핵심적이라는 점을 보인다. 그리고 판단의 참과 거짓 여부에 따라서 즐거움 또한 참과 거짓으로 구분된다고 주장한다. 모든 종류의 즐거움은 이에 대한 판단이 참되어야만 참될 수 있으며, 이때 판단이 참된 것은 기대의 내용 혹은 (...)
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  30. Fighting Pleasure: Plato and the Expansive View of Courage.Nicholas Baima - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (2):255-273.
    In both the Laches (191d-e) and the Laws (1.633c-d, 1.634a-b, and 1. 635d), Plato has his protagonist defend the claim that courage (andreia) is not simply a matter of resisting pain and fear but about overcoming pleasure and desire as well. In this paper, I argue that Plato took the expansive view of courage seriously and that there are several reasons why we should too.
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  31. Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: an Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure is (...)
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  32. Aristotle on the Pleasure of Courage.Erica A. Holberg - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):289-312.
    Aristotle repeatedly qualifies the pleasure of courageous actions relative to other kinds of virtuous actions. This article argues that the pleasure of courageous actions is qualified because virtuous activity and its pleasure is dependent upon external conditions, and the external conditions of courageous actions are particularly constraining. The article shows that Curzer’s explanation of the qualified pleasure of courageous actions by the presence of pain violates Aristotle’s commitment to virtuous actions as being pleasant by their nature.
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  33. The Jellyfish’s Pleasures: Philebus 20b-21d.Katharine R. O’Reilly - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):277-291.
    Scholars have characterised the trial of the life of pleasure in Philebus 20b-21d as digressive or pejorative. I argue that it is neither: it is a thought experiment containing an important argument, in the form of a reductio, of the hypothesis that a life could be most pleasant without cognition. It proceeds in a series of steps, culminating in the precisely chosen image of the jellyfish. Understanding the intended resonance of this creature, and the sense in which it is deprived, (...)
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  34. Inside Out: Pleasure in Chinese Intellectual Traditions.Ann A. Pang-White - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):163-165.
    What is the role of pleasure in Chinese intellectual traditions? Do Chinese thinkers shun all desire for pleasure? Contrary to received opinion, The Chinese Pleasure Book illustrates and argues that early Chinese thinkers across traditions, from the fourth century BCE to the eleventh century CE, all assume that pleasure-seeking and pleasure-taking are part of the human condition and that it is right to engage in such actions. The volume is an ambitious project and Nylan has done a superb job.
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  35. Cicero against cassius on pleasure and virtue: A complicated passage from de finibvs.Geert Roskam - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):725-733.
    In the first two books ofDe finibus, Cicero deals with the Epicurean view of the final goal of life. This philosophical discussion, which is preceded by a rhetorical proem that stands on itself, is framed as a dialogue between Torquatus, who defends the Epicurean position, Cicero, who attacks it, and Triarius, who confines himself to a few critical interventions. If philosophy starts in wonder, according to the celebrated passage from Plato'sTheaetetus, the company meets this criterion admirably well, for the actual (...)
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  36. Pleasure and the divided soul in Plato's republic book 9.Brooks Sommerville - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):147-166.
    In Book 9 of Plato's Republic we find three proofs for the claim that the just person is happier than the unjust person. Curiously, Socrates does not seem to consider these arguments to be coequal when he announces the third and final proof as ‘the greatest and most decisive of the overthrows’. This remark raises a couple of related questions for the interpreter. Whatever precise sense we give to μέγιστον and κυριώτατον in this passage, Socrates is clearly appealing to an (...)
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  37. Attitudinal Pleasure in Plato’s Philebus.Brooks A. Sommerville - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):247-276.
    This paper addresses two interpretive puzzles in Plato’s Philebus. The first concerns the claim, endorsed by both interlocutors, that the most godlike of lives is a pleasureless life of pure thinking. This appears to run afoul of the verdict of the earlier so-called ‘Choice of Lives’ argument that a mixed life is superior to either of its ‘pure’ rivals. A second concerns Socrates’ discussion of false pleasure, in which he appears to be guilty of rank equivocation. I argue that we (...)
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  38. [VII] elemental pleasures: Enjoyment and the good in Plato.Julia Annas - 2018 - In Platonic Ethics, Old and New. Cornell University Press. pp. 137-166.
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  39. A Contemporary Account of Sensory Pleasure.Murat Aydede - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 239-266.
    [This is the penultimate version, please send me an email for the final version]. Some sensations are pleasant, some unpleasant, and some are neither. Furthermore, those that are pleasant or unpleasant are so to different degrees. In this essay, I want to explore what kind of a difference is the difference between these three kinds of sensations. I will develop a comprehensive three-level account of sensory pleasure that is simultaneously adverbialist, functionalist and is also a version of a satisfied experiential-desire (...)
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  40. Alexander of Aphrodisias on Pleasure and Pain in Aristotle.Wei Cheng - 2018 - In William Harris (ed.), Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times. Leiden: pp. 174-200..
  41. Alexander of Aphrodisias on Pleasure and Pain in Aristotle.Wei Cheng - 2018 - In Pleasure and Pain in Classical Time. Leiden: Brill. pp. 174-200.
  42. Dyschereia and Aporia: The Formation of a Philosophical Term.Wei Cheng - 2018 - TAPA 148 (1):75-110.
    Plato’s nephew Speusippus has been widely accepted as the historical person behind the mask of the anti-hedonists in Phlb. 42b–44c. This hypothesis is supported by, inter alia, the link between Socrates’ char- acterization of them as δυσχερεῖς and the frequent references of δυσχέρεια as ἀπορία to Speusippus in Aristotle’s Metaphysics MN. This study argues against assigning any privileged status to Speusippus in the assimilation of δυσχέρεια with ἀπορία. Instead, based on a comprehensive survey of how δυσχερ- words were used in (...)
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  43. The physiology of pleasure in Hippocratic medicine: models and reverberations.João Gabriel Conque - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:17-33.
    The main aims of this article are to demonstrate the presence of two physiological conceptions of pleasure in the Hippocratic Corpus, pointing out the differences between them and conjecturing about the reverberation of one of them in Plato’s dialogue Gorgias. We can find in texts of Greek medicine a description of pleasure produced during sexual intercourse and another related to the occurrence of pleasure during nourishment. However, the second account, unlike the first one, is strongly marked by the notion of (...)
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  44. The physiology of pleasure in Hippocratic medicine: models and reverberations.João Gabriel Conque - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:17-33.
    The main aims of this article are to demonstrate the presence of two physiological conceptions of pleasure in the Hippocratic Corpus, pointing out the differences between them and conjecturing about the reverberation of one of them in Plato’s dialogue Gorgias. We can find in texts of Greek medicine a description of pleasure produced during sexual intercourse and another related to the occurrence of pleasure during nourishment. However, the second account, unlike the first one, is strongly marked by the notion of (...)
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  45. Pleasure, Pain, and the Unity of Soul in Plato's Protagoras.Vanessa de Harven & Wolfgang-Rainer Mann - 2018 - In William V. Harris (ed.), Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times. pp. 111-138.
  46. Pleasure and Pain in Classical Times.William Harris (ed.) - 2018 - Brill.
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  47. Plato's Philebus and the value of idle pleasure.Verity Harte - 2018 - In David Owen Brink, Susan Sauvé Meyer & Christopher John Shields (eds.), Virtue, happiness, knowledge: themes from the work of Gail Fine and Terence Irwin. Oxford University Press.
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  48. Hume on pleasure and value and the Kantian challenge.André Klaudat - 2018 - Filosofia Unisinos 19 (2).
  49. John Stuart Mill: "Pleasure" in the Laws of Psychology and the Principle of Morals.Dominique Kuenzle - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical thinking about pleasure today, especially in the context of normative ethics, is deeply influenced by the concept’s function within Bentham’s and Mill’s Utilitarianism, according to which the moral quality of any action depends on its tendency to “maximize pleasure” and “minimize pain”. According to Mill’s own philosophy of science and language, the content and function of “pleasure” is determined by its role in scientific induction, specifically within the associationist psychological theory Mill shares with his father, James Mill. Pleasures, it (...)
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  50. Lingering: Pleasure, Desire, and Life in Kant's Critique of Judgment.Robert Lehman - 2018 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 32 (2):217-242.
    So just what Dante scorns as unworthy alike of heaven and hell, Botticelli accepts, that middle world in which men take no side in great conflicts, and decide no great causes, and make great refusals.In what follows, I examine a notion of desire that, I shall claim, is implicit in Immanuel Kant's theorization of aesthetic judgment in the Critique of Judgment.1 At first, this undertaking is likely to seem misguided. After all, Kant grounds his attempt to provide an a priori (...)
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