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  1. The Just as an Absent Ground in Plato's Cratylus.Sarah Horton - 2021 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):281-292.
    Through a study of nature and paternal power, this paper sheds light on the neglected theme of the relation between language and justice in Plato’s Cratylus. The dialogue inquires after the correctness of names, and it turns out that no lineage leads us back to a natural ground of names. Every lineage breaks; nature is always disrupted by the monstrous. It does not follow, however, that names are mere conventions without significance: on the contrary, naming is best understood as a (...)
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  2. The Science of Philosophy: Discourse and Deception in Plato’s Sophist.Pettersson Olof - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):221-237.
    At 252e1 to 253c9 in Plato’s Sophist, the Eleatic Visitor explains why philosophy is a science. Like the art of grammar, philosophical knowledge corresponds to a generic structure of discrete kinds and is acquired by systematic analysis of how these kinds intermingle. In the literature, the Visitor’s science is either understood as an expression of a mature and authentic platonic metaphysics, or as a sophisticated illusion staged to illustrate the seductive lure of sophistic deception. By showing how the Visitor’s account (...)
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  3. Dangerous Voices: On Written and Spoken Discourse in Plato’s Protagoras.Pettersson Olof - 2017 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Plato’s Protagoras contains, among other things, three short but puzzling remarks on the media of philosophy. First, at 328e5–329b1, Plato makes Socrates worry that long speeches, just like books, are deceptive, because they operate in a discursive mode void of questions and answers. Second, at 347c3–348a2, Socrates argues that discussion of poetry is a presumptuous affair, because, the poems’ message, just like the message of any written text, cannot be properly examined if the author is not present. Third, at 360e6–361d6, (...)
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  4. The Legacy of Hermes: Deception and Dialectic in Plato’s Cratylus.Olof Pettersson - 2016 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):26-58.
    Against the background of a conventionalist theory, and staged as a defense of a naturalistic notion of names and naming, the critique of language developed in Plato’s Cratylus does not only propose that human language, in contrast to the language of the gods, is bound to the realm of myth and lie. The dialogue also concludes by offering a set of reasons to think that knowledge of reality is not within the reach of our words. Interpretations of the dialogue’s long (...)
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  5. On Calling the Gods by the Right Names.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):168-193.
    Do you need to know the name of the god you're praying to? If you get the name wrong what happens to the prayer? What if the god has more than one name? Who gets to decide whether the name works (you or the god or neither)? What are names anyway? Are the names of the gods any different in how they work from any other names? Is there a way of fixing the reference without using the name so as (...)
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  6. The Cratylus of Plato: A Commentary. By Francesco Ademollo. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):190-193.
  7. Plato and Peirce on Likeness and Semblance.Han-Liang Chang - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):301-312.
    In his well-known essay, ‘What Is a Sign?’ (CP 2.281, 285) Peirce uses ‘likeness’ and ‘resemblance’ interchangeably in his definition of icon. The synonymity of the two words has rarely, if ever, been questioned. Curiously, a locus classicus of the pair, at least in F. M. Cornford’s English translation, can be found in a late dialogue of Plato, namely, the Sophist. In this dialogue on the myth and truth of the sophists’ profession, the mysterious ‘stranger’, who is most likely Socrates’ (...)
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  8. Sophists, Names and Democracy.Jakub Jirsa - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):125-138.
    The article argues that the Euthydemus shows the essential connection between sophistry, right usage of language, and politics. It shows how the sophistic use of language correlates with the manners of politics which Plato associates with the sophists. First, it proceeds by showing the explicit criticism of both brothers, for they seem unable to fulfill the task given to them. Second, several times in the dialogue Socrates criticizes the sophists’ use of language, since it is totally inappropriate to fulfill the (...)
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  9. Francesco Ademollo, Plato's Cratylus: A Commentary. [REVIEW]Shawn Loht - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):450-51.
  10. Plato's Cratylus: A Commentary. [REVIEW]Shawn Loht - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):450-451.
  11. Meaning and Cognition in Plato’s Cratylus and Theaetetus.Deborah K. W. Modrak - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):167-174.
    For Plato, the crucial function of human cognition is to grasp truths. Explaining how we are able to do this is fundamental to understanding our cognitive powers. Plato addresses this topic from several different angles. In the Cratylus and Theaetetus, he attempts to identify the elemental cognitions that are the foundations of language and knowledge. He considers several candidates for this role, most notably, perception and simple meaning-bearing concepts. In the first section, we will look at Plato’s worries about semantic (...)
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  12. I Fondamenti Della Riflessione di Platone Sul Linguaggio: Il Cratilo.Francesco Aronadio - 2011 - Edizioni di Storia E Letteratura.
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  13. Plato on the Norms of Speech and Thought.Matthew Evans - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (4):322-349.
    Near the beginning of the Cratylus (385e-387d) Plato's Socrates argues, against his friend Hermogenes, that the standards of correctness for our use of names in speech are in no way up to us. Yet this conclusion should strike us, at least initially, as bizarre. After all, how could it not be up to us whether to call our children by the names of our parents, or whether to call dogs “dogs“? My aim in this paper will be to show that, (...)
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  14. Seeking Freedom From the Fregean Under the Description Methodology.Terry Penner - 2011 - In G. Anagnostopoulos (ed.), "Socratic, Platonic and Aristotelian studies" Essays in honnor of Gerasimos Santas. pp. 103-124.
  15. Plato’s Republic: A Critical Guide.Mark L. Mcpherran, G. R. F. Ferrari, Rachel Barney, Julia Annas, Rachana Kamtekar & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Republic has proven to be of astounding influence and importance. Justly celebrated as Plato's central text, it brings together all of his prior works, unifying them into a comprehensive vision that is at once theological, philosophical, political, and moral. These essays provide a a state-of-the-art research picture of the most interesting aspects of the Republic, and address questions that continue to puzzle and provoke, such as: Does Plato succeed in his argument that the life of justice is the most (...)
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  16. Language, Search and Aporia in Plato’s Seventh Letter.Olof Pettersson - 2010 - THE JOURNAL OF SAPIENTIAL WISDOM AND PHILOSOPHY (SOPHIA PERENNIS) 7 (2):31-62.
    This article investigates the relation between Language and Being as it is articulated in the so-called philosophical digression of Plato‘s alleged Seventh Letter. Here the author of the letter claims, in contrast to the testimony of Plato‘s many dialogues, that there has never been and there will never be any written word on Plato‘s philosophy; and in addition, as if this was not sufficiently perplexing, he goes on to explain that the matters of philosophy do in fact not admit of (...)
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  17. The Divine Logos: Plato, Heraclitus, and Heidegger in the Sophist.Ammon Allred - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):1-18.
    In this paper, I address the way in which Plato’s Sophist rethinks his lifelong dialogue with Heraclitus. Plato uses a concept of logos in this dialogue that is much more Heraclitean than his earlier concept of the logos. I argue that he employs this concept in order to resolve those problems with his earlier theory of ideas that he had brought to light in the Parmenides. I argue that the concept of the dialectic that the Stranger develops rejects, rather than (...)
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  18. Review of Vico and Plato. [REVIEW]Marco Andreacchio - 2009 - Interpretation 36 (2).
  19. The Theory of Names in Plato’s Cratylus.Nicholas Bunnin - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):531-540.
  20. Sofista 236E-241A: Um Estudo Sobre a Leitura Platônica de Parmênides de Eléia.Rafael Huguenin - 2009 - Dissertation, PUC-Rio, Brazil
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  21. Le logos du sophiste. Image et parole dans le Sophiste de Platon.Felipe Ledesma - 2009 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 30 (2):207-254.
    The logos question, one of the most important among the subjects that traverse the Plato's Sophist, has in fact some different aspects: the criticism of father Parmenides' logos, that is unable to speak about the not-being, but also about the being; the relations between logos and its cognates, phantasia, doxa and dianoia; the logos’ complex structure, that is a compound with onoma and rema; the difference between naming and saying, two distinct but inseparable actions; the logical and ontological conditions that (...)
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  22. Alcidamas, Isocrates, and Plato on Speech, Writing, and Philosophical Rhetoric.Marina Berzins Mccoy - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):45-66.
  23. GERASIMOS [or Seeking Freedom From the Fregean Under the Description Methodology].Terry Penner - 2009 - Philosophical Inquiry 31 (1-2):107-130.
  24. Words & Ideas: The Roots of Plato's Philosophy.Fritz-Gregor Herrmann - 2007 - Distributor in the Usa, David Brown Bk. Co..
    Investigating the terms such as 'Form' or 'idea', 'essence' or 'being', 'participation', 'presence' and 'community', this book aims to determine the precise historical and philosophical contexts on which Plato drew in the formulation of his thoughts.
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  25. New Essays on Plato: Language and Thought in Fourth-Century Greek Philosophy.Fritz-Gregor Herrmann & Stefan Büttner (eds.) - 2006 - David Brown Book Co., Distributor.
  26. Logic and Music in Plato's Phaedo.Dominic Bailey - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):95-115.
  27. Plato's Problem, Ug, and the Language Organ.David Lightfood - 2005 - In James McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press. pp. 42--60.
  28. Platonism and the Invention of the Problem of Universals.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2004 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (3):233-256.
    In this paper, I explore the origins of the ‘problem of universals’. I argue that the problem has come to be badly formulated and that consideration of it has been impeded by falsely supposing that Platonic Forms were ever intended as an alternative to Aristotelian universals. In fact, the role that Forms are supposed by Plato to fulfill is independent of the function of a universal. I briefly consider the gradual mutation of the problem in the Academy, in Alexander of (...)
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  29. Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics, by Jeffrey Barnouw. [REVIEW]Michael B. Papazian - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):235-238.
  30. A Conception of Logos in Plato’s Theatetus: Commentary on Robert Colert’s Paper.Rebecca Bensen - 2003 - Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (2):89-92.
  31. For the Name’s Sake.Michael Naas - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):199-221.
    In Plato’s later dialogues, and particularly in the Sophist, there is a general reinterpretation and rehabilitation of the name (onoma) in philosophy. No longer understood rather vaguely as one of potentially dangerous and deceptive elements of everyday language or of poetic language, the word onoma is recast in the Sophist and related dialogues into one of the essential elements of a philosophical language that aims to make claims or propositions about the way thingsare. Onoma, now understood as name, is thus (...)
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  32. Refining Discourse: Language, Authority and Community in Ancient China and Greece.John Lindsay Dye - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    Chapter 13.3 of the Confucian Analects proposes an intriguing solution to the problem of government: zhengming, conventionally translated "rectification of names." Confucius suggests that we should be particularly mindful of the vocabulary we use in conversing with one another, as it plays an important role in shaping our communities and values. Language is not simply a transparent medium for the conveyance of information. Rather, it furnishes a complex and subtle form of discourse that affirms and reinforces certain values while neglecting (...)
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  33. Human Discourse, Eros, and Madness In Plato’s Republic.David N. McNeill - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):235 - 268.
    IN BOOK 9 OF THE REPUBLIC, Socrates tells Adeimantus that the “tyrantmakers” manage to defeat the relatives of the nascent tyrant in the battle over the young man’s soul by contriving “to make in him some eros, a sort of great winged drone, to be the leader of the idle desires.” This “leader of the soul,” Socrates claims.
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  34. P. Büttgen, S. Diebler, M. Rashed: Théories de la Phrase Et de la Proposition de Platon À Averroes . (Études de Littérature Ancienne 10.) Pp. Ix + 336. Paris: Éditions Rue d'Ulm, 1999. Paper, Frs. 196. ISBN: 2-7288-0252-. [REVIEW]Héléne Perdicoyianni-Paléologou - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (02):608-.
  35. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
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  36. Plato’s Theaetetus: On the Way of the Logos.Seth Benardete - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):25 - 53.
    THE OPENING OF THE THEAETETUS is curious. The report we have of another opening of nearly the same length indicates that it was always a curiosity. If both openings are Plato’s, and the rest of the dialogue they preface were not different, then Plato changed his mind about how to start off the trilogy to which the Theaetetus belongs. If the second version is spurious, someone thought he could surpass Plato and make a more sensible introduction. If ours is spurious, (...)
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  37. Space, Time, Shape, and Direction: Creative Discourse in the Timaeus.Catherine Osborne - 1996 - In Christopher Gill & Mary Margaret McCabe (eds.), Form and Argument in Late Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 179--211.
    There is an analogy between Timaeus's act of describing a world in words and the demiurge's task of making a world of matter. This analogy implies a parallel between language as a system of reproducing ideas in words, and the world, which reproduces reality in particular things. Authority lies in the creation of a likeness in words of the eternal Forms. The Forms serve as paradigms both for the physical world created by the demiurge, and for the world in discourse (...)
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  38. Language, Ethics, and the Other Between Athens and Jerusalem: A Comparative Study of Plato and Rosenzweig.Luc Anckaert - 1995 - Philosophy East and West 45 (4):545-567.
    A comparative study of Plato's "Republic" and Rozenzweig's "Stern der Eriösung" proposed that the way of speaking determines which reality can be spoken and what types of relationality are possible. Rhetorical analysis shows that Plato's philosophy of language, in contrast to Rozenzweig's, undervalues the relational possibilities of time, alterity, and language. This is revealed through a study of the place and significance of the genera of arts for thinking and society.
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  39. What’s in a Name?: A Reconsideration of the Cratylus’ Historical Sources and Topics.Susan B. Levin - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):91-115.
  40. Plato on Understanding Language.David Bostock - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press.
  41. On Plato's Sophist.Seth Benardete - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (4):747 - 780.
    In the first part, it is argued that the Stranger has employed in his divisions both eikastic and phantastic speech, and that the issue of being arises because Theaetetus fails to recognize Socrates as the philosopher. In the second part, it is argued that phantastic speech as the experience of eikastic speech is false opinion, and that the double account of logos, as the weaving together of species and of agent and action, corresponds respectively to that which makes speech possible, (...)
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  42. Giovanni Cerri: Platone sociologo della communicazione. (La Cultura.) Pp. xvii +156. Milan: Arnoldo Mondadori, II Saggiatore, 1991. Paper, L. 38,000. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (2):440-440.
  43. The Folly of Praise: Plato's Critique of Encomiastic Discourse in the Lysis and Symposium.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (01):112-.
    Plato targets the encomiastic genre in three separate dialogues: the Lysis, the Menexenus and the Symposium. Many studies have been devoted to Plato's handling of the funeral oration in the Menexenus. Plato's critique of the encomium in the Lysis and Symposium, however, has not been accorded the same kind of treatment. Yet both of these dialogues go beyond the Menexenus in exploring the opposition between encomiastic and philosophic discourse. In the Lysis, I will argue, Plato sets up encomiastic rhetoric as (...)
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  44. The Cratylus: Plato's Critique of Naming.Timothy M. S. Baxter (ed.) - 1992 - E.J. Brill.
    This book aims to give a coherent interpretation of the whole dialogue, paying particular attention to these etymologies.The book discusses the rival theories ...
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  45. Peirce-Suing Plato.William Pencak - 1991 - Semiotics:370-374.
  46. Plato and Davidson: Parts of the Soul and Weakness of Will.Terrence M. Penner - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (Supplement):35-74.
  47. Plato's Phaedo and Plato's 'Essentialism'.Thomas Wheaton Bestor - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (1):26 – 51.
    A new story is abroad that plato possessed two redundant devices in the "phaedo" to explain why some sensible "f" (a drift of snow, say) is "g" but never not-"g" (cold, say): (i) "f" participates in a special way in the (upper world) forms "f" and "g"; (ii) "f" is essentially "g" in its own (lower world) right. Were there such genuinely redundant devices, this would tidily explain both plato's coming to reject essential properties for sensibles in the "republic" and (...)
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  48. A Missed Encounter: Plato's Socrates and Geach's Euthyphro.A. E. Benjamin - 1987 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 29 (1):145-170.
    In this paper I hope to show that Geach misunderstands the nature of Plato's argument in the Euthyphro and more importantly the reasoning behind the dialectical strategy adopted by Socrates. Furthermore I shall argue that Geach's reading of the Euthyphro engenders serious difficulties, that stand in the way of understanding the manner in which Plato construes the problem of determining the nature of, and relationship between universal and particulars, which is of great significance because it is precisely this problem, in (...)
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  49. The Ascent From Nominalism: Some Existence Arguments in Plato’s Middle Dialogues.Terry Penner - 1987 - Springer Verlag.
    divisibility in Physics VI. I had been assuming at that time that Aristotle's elimination of reference to the infinitely large in his account of the potential inf inite--like the elimination of the infinitely small from nineteenth century accounts of limits and continuity--gave us everything that was important in a theory of the infinite. Hilbert's paper showed me that this was not obviously so. Suddenly other certainties about Aristotle's judicious toning down of Platonic extremisms began to crumble. The upshot of work (...)
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  50. Episteme and Logos in Plato’s Later Thought.Alexander Nehamas - 1984 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 66 (1):11-36.
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