Results for 'Scott Fricker'

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  1.  27
    The impact of ethical ideology on modifiers of ethical decisions and suggested punishment for ethical infractions.Robert A. Giacalone, Scott Fricker & Jon W. Beard - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (7):497 - 510.
    The present study sought to determine the extent to which individuals'' ethical ideologies, as measured by Forsyth''s (1980) Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ), impacted the degree of punishment they advocated for differing ethical infractions, as well as their selection of non-ethics related variables that might be used to modify judgments of disciplinary action. The data revealed that individual ideology does impact both advocated punishment and choice of non-ethics related variables, but only in some measures. The data are discussed in terms of (...)
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  2.  3
    Epistemology.Anthony O'Hear (ed.) - 2009 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Based on the London Lecture Series of the Royal Institute of Philosophy for 2006–7, this collection brings together essays from leading figures in a rapidly developing field of philosophy. Contributors include: Alvin Goldman, Timothy Williamson, Duncan Pritchard, Miranda Fricker, Scott Sturgeon, Jose Zalabardo, and Quassin Casay.
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  3.  35
    The embryological origins of the gene theory.Scott F. Gilbert - 1978 - Journal of the History of Biology 11 (2):307-351.
  4.  70
    A Case for Consumer Social Responsibility : Including a Selected Review of Consumer Ethics/Social Responsibility Research.Scott J. Vitell - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (4):767-774.
    The literature is replete with articles emphasizing the importance of corporate social responsibility. However, few, if any, of these articles discuss the role of the consumer in achieving corporate social responsibility. It is the premise of the current paper that it may be difficult for corporate social responsibility to succeed without the assistance of consumers. That is, for corporate social responsibility to flourish, it needs to be accompanied by consumer social responsibility. This paper examines this proposition, makes the distinction between (...)
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  5. Physicalism and overdetermination.Scott Sturgeon - 1998 - Mind 107 (426):411-432.
    I argue that our knowledge of the world's causal structure does not generate a sound argument for physicalism. This undermines the popular view that physicalism is the only scientifically respectable worldview.
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  6.  74
    The Muncy–Vitell Consumer Ethics Scale: A Modification and Application.Scott J. Vitell & James Muncy - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):267-275.
    This study compares college students with other adults in terms of the Muncy–Vitell (1992) consumer ethics scale. Further, the study updates the Muncy–Vitell consumer ethics scale with modifications that include rewording and the addition of new items. These new items can be grouped into three distinct categories – (1) downloading/buying counterfeit goods, (2) recycling/environmental awareness and (3) doing the right thing/doing good. The study also compares these two groups in terms of their attitude toward business. Results show that there is (...)
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  7. Deep Disagreement and the Problem of the Criterion.Scott F. Aikin - 2018 - Topoi 40 (5):1017-1024.
    My objective in this paper is to compare two philosophical problems, the problem of the criterion and the problem of deep disagreement, and note a core similarity which explains why many proposed solutions to these problems seem to fail along similar lines. From this observation, I propose a kind of skeptical solution to the problem of deep disagreement, and this skeptical program has consequences for the problem as it manifests in political epistemology and metaphilosophy.
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  8.  48
    Bothsiderism.Scott F. Aikin & John P. Casey - 2022 - Argumentation 36 (2):249-268.
    This paper offers an account of a fallacy we will call bothsiderism, which is to mistake disagreement on an issue for evidence that either a compromise on, suspension of judgment regarding, or continued discussion of the issue is in order. Our view is that this is a fallacy of a unique and heretofore untheorized type, a fallacy of meta-argumentation. The paper develops as follows. After a brief introduction, we examine a recent bothsiderist case in American politics. We use this as (...)
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  9.  71
    The Meta‐Nudge – A Response to the Claim That the Use of Nudges During the Informed Consent Process is Unavoidable.Scott D. Gelfand - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (8):601-608.
    Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, in Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, assert that rejecting the use nudges is ‘pointless’ because ‘[i]n many cases, some kind of nudge is inevitable’. Schlomo Cohen makes a similar claim. He asserts that in certain situations surgeons cannot avoid nudging patients either toward or away from consenting to surgical interventions. Cohen concludes that in these situations, nudging patients toward consenting to surgical interventions is uncriticizable or morally permissible. I call this argument: The (...)
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  10. Pollock on defeasible reasons.Scott Sturgeon - 2012 - Philosophical Studies (1):1-14.
  11.  44
    Prevailing theories of consciousness are challenged by novel cross-modal associations acquired between subliminal stimuli.Ryan B. Scott, Jason Samaha, Ron Chrisley & Zoltan Dienes - 2018 - Cognition 175 (C):169-185.
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  12. Social structure.John Scott - 2017 - In Hȧkon Leiulfsrud & Peter Sohlberg (eds.), Concepts in action: conceptual constructionism. Boston: Brill.
     
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  13. Epistemology: Volume 64.Anthony O'Hear (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Based on the London Lecture Series of the Royal Institute of Philosophy for 2006–7, this collection brings together essays from leading figures in a rapidly developing field of philosophy. Contributors include: Alvin Goldman, Timothy Williamson, Duncan Pritchard, Miranda Fricker, Scott Sturgeon, Jose Zalabardo, and Quassin Casay.
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  14.  19
    Fallacies of Meta-argumentation.Scott Aikin & John Casey - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (4):360-385.
    This article argues that the theoretical concept of meta-argumentative fallacy is useful. The authors argue for this along two lines. The first is that with the concept, the authors may clarify the concept of meta-argumentation. That is, by theorizing where meta-argument goes wrong, the authors may capture the norms of this level of argumentation. The second is that the concept of meta-argumentative fallacies provides an explanatory model for a variety of errors in argument otherwise difficult to theorize. The authors take (...)
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  15. Existence and description in formal logic.Dana Scott - 1967 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 38 (1):181--200.
  16.  50
    A cross-cultural study of the antecedents of the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility.Scott J. Vitell & Joseph G. P. Paolillo - 2004 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 13 (2-3):185-199.
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  17.  40
    A cross‐cultural study of the antecedents of the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility.Scott J. Vitell & Joseph G. P. Paolillo - 2004 - Business Ethics 13 (2-3):185-199.
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  18.  51
    Ethical judgments and intentions: A multinational study of marketing professionals.Scott J. Vitell, Aysen Bakir, Joseph G. P. Paolillo, Encarnacion Ramos Hidalgo, Jamal Al-Khatib & Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (2):151–171.
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  19.  46
    Finding the History and Philosophy of Science.Scott B. Weingart - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):201-213.
    History of science and philosophy of science have experienced a somewhat turbulent relationship over the last century. At times it has been said that philosophy needs history, or that history needs philosophy. Very occasionally, something entirely new is said to need them both. Often, however, their relationship is seen as little more than a marriage of convenience. This article explores that marriage by analyzing the citations of over 7,000 historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science. The data reveal that a small (...)
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  20.  87
    Evo-devo, devo-evo, and devgen-popgen.Scott F. Gilbert - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):347-352.
  21.  40
    Gaming Up Life: Considerations for Game Expansions.Scott Kretchmar - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):142-155.
  22.  32
    Essentials of existential phenomenological research.Scott Demane Churchill - 2022 - Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
    The brief, practical texts in the Essentials of Qualitative Methods series introduce social science and psychology researchers to key approaches to capturing phenomena not easily measured quantitatively, offering exciting, nimble opportunities to gather in-depth qualitative data. In this book, Scott D. Churchill introduces readers to existential phenomenological research, an approach that seeks an in-depth, embodied understanding of subjective human existence that reflects a person's values, purposes, ideals, intentions, emotions, and relationships. This method helps researchers understand the lives and needs (...)
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  23.  74
    The Enforcement Approach to Coercion.Scott A. Anderson - 2010 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 5 (1):1-31.
    This essay differentiates two approaches to understanding the concept of coercion, and argues for the relative merits of the one currently out of fashion. The approach currently dominant in the philosophical literature treats threats as essential to coercion, and understands coercion in terms of the way threats alter the costs and benefits of an agent’s actions; I call this the “pressure” approach. It has largely superseded the “enforcement approach,” which focuses on the powers and actions of the coercer rather than (...)
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  24.  80
    A Gruesome Problem for the Curve-Fitting Solution.Scott DeVito - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (3):391-396.
    This paper is a response to Forster and Sober's [1994] solution to the curve-fitting problem. If their solution is correct, it will provide us with a solution to the New Riddle of Induction as well as provide a basis for choosing realism over conventionalism. Examining this solution is also important as Forster and Sober incorporate it in much of their other philosophical work (see Forster [1995a, b, 1994] and Sober [1996, 1995, 1993]). I argue that Forster and Sober's solution is (...)
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  25.  44
    The Explanatory Structure of the Transcendental Deduction and a Cognitive Interpretation of the First Critique.Scott Edgar - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):285-314.
    Consider two competing interpretations of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: the epistemic and cognitive interpretations. The epistemic interpretation presents the first Critique as a work of epistemology, but what is more, it sees Kant as an early proponent of anti-psychologism—the view that descriptions of how the mind works are irrelevant for epistemology.2 Even if Kant does not always manage to purge certain psychological-sounding idioms from his writing, the epistemic interpretation has it, he is perfectly clear that he means his evaluation (...)
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  26.  57
    Argumentative Adversariality, Contrastive Reasons, and the Winners-and-Losers Problem.Scott Aikin - 2020 - Topoi 40 (5):837-844.
    This essay has two connected theses. First, that given the contrastivity of reasons, a form of dialectical adversariality of argument follows. This dialectical adversariality accounts for a broad variety of both argumentative virtues and vices. Second, in light of this contrastivist view of reasons, the primary objection to argumentative adversarialism, the winners-and-losers problem, can be answered.
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  27.  50
    Meta-epistemology and the varieties of epistemic infinitism.Scott F. Aikin - 2008 - Synthese 163 (2):175-185.
    I will assume here the defenses of epistemic infinitism are adequate and inquire as to the variety standpoints within the view. I will argue that infinitism has three varieties depending on the strength of demandingness of the infinitist requirement and the purity of its conception of epistemic justification, each of which I will term strong pure, strong impure, and weak impure infinitisms. Further, I will argue that impure infinitisms have the dialectical advantage.
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  28.  81
    Abortion counselling and the informed consent dilemma.Scott Woodcock - 2010 - Bioethics 25 (9):495-504.
    An obstacle to abortion exists in the form of abortion ‘counselling’ that discourages women from terminating their pregnancies. This counselling involves providing information about the procedure that tends to create feelings of guilt, anxiety and strong emotional reactions to the recognizable form of a human fetus. Instances of such counselling that involve false or misleading information are clearly unethical and do not prompt much philosophical reflection, but the prospect of truthful abortion counselling draws attention to a delicate issue for healthcare (...)
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  29.  92
    Who is Afraid of Epistemology’s Regress Problem?Scott F. Aikin - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 126 (2):191-217.
    What follows is a taxonomy of arguments that regresses of inferential justification are vicious. They fall out into four general classes: conceptual arguments from incompleteness, conceptual arguments from arbitrariness, ought-implies-can arguments from human quantitative incapacities, and ought-implies can arguments from human qualitative incapacities. They fail with a developed theory of "infinitism" consistent with valuational pluralism and modest epistemic foundationalism.
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  30. Truth and demonstratives.Scott Weinstein - 1974 - Noûs 8 (2):179-184.
  31.  22
    Lebenssoziologie.Scott Lash - 2005 - Theory, Culture and Society 22 (3):1-23.
    This article presents a case for the revaluation of vitalism in sociological theory. It argues for the relevance of such a Lebenssoziologie in the global information age. The body of the article addresses what a vitalist sociology might be through a consideration of Georg Simmel. The analysis works from the juxtapositon of vitalist monadology with postivist atomism. It shows how Simmel drew on the Kantian cognition to develop an idea of the social. Here Kant’s Newtonian atomism was transformed into Simmel’s (...)
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  32.  20
    Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement.Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse - 2013 - Routledge.
    Why We Argue : A Guide to Political Disagreement presents an accessible and engaging introduction to the theory of argument, with special emphasis on the way argument works in public political debate. The authors develop a view according to which proper argument is necessary for one’s individual cognitive health; this insight is then expanded to the collective health of one’s society. Proper argumentation, then, is seen to play a central role in a well-functioning democracy. Written in a lively style and (...)
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  33.  15
    Cognition and Society: Prolegomenon to a Dialog.Thom Scott-Phillips & Daniel Nettle - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (6):e13162.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 6, June 2022.
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  34.  31
    Health-care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating to patient capacity to consent to treatment.Scott Lamont, Yun-Hee Jeon & Mary Chiarella - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (6):684-707.
    This integrative review aims to provide a synthesis of research findings of health-care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating to patient capacity to consent to or refuse treatment within the general hospital setting. Search strategies included relevant health databases, hand searching of key journals, ‘snowballing’ and expert recommendations. The review identified various knowledge gaps and attitudinal dispositions of health-care professionals, which influence their behaviours and decision-making in relation to capacity to consent processes. The findings suggest that there is tension between (...)
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  35.  61
    Replies.Scott Soames - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):429–452.
    His first point is that true exhibits pathologies that smidget doesn’t. If smidget is undefined for Charlie, then the sentence Charlie is a smidget is undefined, and there is no basis for accepting either it or its negation. There is no pathology here; it is simply a case in which a sentence and its negation must both be rejected. With smidget there is no paradoxicality analogous to Liar sentences and no circularity corresponding to Truth Tellers. Gupta concludes that true and (...)
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  36.  90
    What's wrong with bribery.Scott Turow - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (4):249 - 251.
    The article argues that bribery is wrong because it violates fundamental notion of equality and it undermines the vitality of the institutions affected.
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  37.  34
    Philosophical Essays, Volume 2: The Philosophical Significance of Language.Scott Soames - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    The two volumes of Philosophical Essays bring together the most important essays written by one of the world's foremost philosophers of language. Scott Soames has selected thirty-one essays spanning nearly three decades of thinking about linguistic meaning and the philosophical significance of language. A judicious collection of old and new, these volumes include sixteen essays published in the 1980s and 1990s, nine published since 2000, and six new essays. The essays in Volume 1 investigate what linguistic meaning is; how (...)
  38.  66
    Genealogy and the Body: Foucault/Deleuze/Nietzsche.Scott Lash - 1984 - Theory, Culture and Society 2 (2):1-17.
  39.  28
    Introduction: Merging Law, Human Rights, and Social Epidemiology.Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):498-509.
  40. Conceptualizing Rape as Coerced Sex.Scott A. Anderson - 2016 - Ethics 127 (1):50-87.
    Several prominent theorists have recently advocated reconceptualizing rape as “nonconsensual sex,” omitting the traditional “force” element of the crime. I argue that such a conceptualization fails to capture what is distinctively problematic about rape for women and why rape is pivotal in supporting women’s gender oppression. I argue that conceptualizing rape as coerced sex can replace both the force and nonconsent elements and thereby remedies some of the main difficulties with extant definitions, especially in recognizing “acquaintance” rape as such. I (...)
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  41.  93
    Universal practice and universal applicability tests in moral philosophy.Scott Forschler - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (12):3041-3058.
    We can distinguish two kinds of moral universalization tests for practical principles. One requires that the universal practice of the principle, i.e., universal conformity to it by all agents in a given world, satisfies some condition. The other requires that conformity to the principle by any possible agent, in any situation and at any time, satisfies some condition. We can call these universal practice and universal applicability tests respectively. The logical distinction between these tests is rarely appreciated, and many philosophers (...)
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  42.  11
    Posttraumatic stress in organizations: Types, antecedents, and consequences.Scott David Williams & Jonathan Williams - 2020 - Business and Society Review 125 (1):23-40.
    Research indicates that the well‐being and productivity of over 100 million people in the global workforce may be compromised by posttraumatic stress (PTS). Given that work‐related experiences are often the source of the trauma that leads to PTS, and that PTS due to any cause can interfere with employees’ job performance, organizations would do well to consider the antecedents and consequences of PTS. This review of research—primarily within fields adjacent to business—on the types, antecedents, consequences, and organizational implications of PTS (...)
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  43. Tu Quoque Arguments and the Significance of Hypocrisy.Scott F. Aikin - 2008 - Informal Logic 28 (2):155-169.
    Though textbook tu quoque arguments are fallacies of relevance, many versions of arguments from hypocrisy are indirectly relevant to the issue. Some arguments from hypocrisy are challenges to the authority of a speaker on the basis of either her sincerity or competency regarding the issue. Other arguments from hypocrisy purport to be evidence of the impracticability of the opponent’s proposals. Further, some versions of hypocrisy charges from impracticability are open to a counter that I will term tu quoque judo.
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  44.  17
    Picnic comma lightning: in search of a new reality.Laurence Scott - 2018 - London: William Heinemann.
    Cognitive science proposes that we have evolved to build mental maps of the world not according to its actual, physical nature, but according to what allows us to thrive. In other words, our individual and collective realities are fictions - carefully constructed to enable us to maintain our particular perspectives. It used to be that our fictions were rooted to reasonably solid things: to people, places and memories. Today, in an age of online personas, alternative truths, constant surveillance and an (...)
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  45.  32
    The Moral Problem of Worse Actors.Scott Wisor - 2014 - Ethics and Global Politics 7 (2):47-64.
    Individuals and institutions sometimes have morally stringent reasons to not do a given action. For example, an oil company might have morally stringent reasons to refrain from providing revenue to a genocidal regime, or an engineer might have morally stringent reasons to refrain from providing her expertise in the development of weapons of mass destruction. But in some cases, if the agent does not do the action, another actor will do it with much worse consequences. For example, the oil company (...)
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  46.  98
    Teleology and the nature of mental states.Scott R. Sehon - 1994 - American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (1):63-72.
  47.  63
    Straw Men, Iron Men, and Argumentative Virtue.Scott F. Aikin & John P. Casey - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):431-440.
    The straw man fallacy consists in inappropriately constructing or selecting weak versions of the opposition’s arguments. We will survey the three forms of straw men recognized in the literature, the straw, weak, and hollow man. We will then make the case that there are examples of inappropriately reconstructing stronger versions of the opposition’s arguments. Such cases we will call iron man fallacies. The difference between appropriate and inappropriate iron manning clarifies the limits of the virtue of open-mindedness.
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  48.  23
    Zur Axiomatik der Mengenlehre.Dana Scott - 1958 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (2):215-216.
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  49.  30
    Perceiving the moral dimension of practice: insights from Murdoch, Vetlesen, and Aristotle.P. Anne Scott - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):137-145.
    This paper situates the moral domain of practice within the context of a particular description of nursing practice – one that sees human interaction at the heart of that practice. Such a description fits not only with professional rhetoric but also with literature from patients and recent empirical work exploring the nature of nursing practice.Martha Levine in her 1977 description of ethics, within the context of nursing practice, indicated that what was important from an ethical perspective was how we interact (...)
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  50.  44
    Why Parents’ Interests Matter.Scott Altman - 2022 - Ethics 133 (2):271-285.
    This discussion responds to two recent articles defending a child-centered view of parenting. Anca Gheaus and James Dwyer argue that children should be reared by the best available parent, who, in turn, should make choices based only on children’s welfare. They claim that love and respect require this fiduciary stance. However, love and respect do not justify child-centered norms. If children were competent, they would embrace norms that accommodate parental interests because they benefit from nonfiduciary rules, are grateful to their (...)
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