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  1. Reasoning Through Narrative.A. K. Flowerree - forthcoming - Episteme:1-15.
    A peculiar feature of our species is that we settle what to believe, value, and do by reasoning through narratives. A narrative is adiachronic, information-rich story that contains persons, objects, and at least one event. When we reason through narrative, we usenarrative to settle what to do, to make predictions, to guide normative expectations, and to ground which reactive attitudes we think areappropriate in a situation. Narratives explain, justify, and provide understanding. Narratives play a ubiquitous role in human reasoning. Andyet, (...)
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  2. Social Epistemology and Epidemiology.Benjamin W. McCraw - forthcoming - Acta Analytica:1-16.
    Recent approaches to the social epistemology of belief formation have appealed to an epidemiological model, on which the mechanisms explaining how we form beliefs from our society or community along the lines of infectious disease. More specifically, Alvin Goldman (2001) proposes an etiology of (social) belief along the lines of an epistemological epidemiology. On this “contagion model,” beliefs are construed as diseases that infect people via some socio-epistemic community. This paper reconsiders Goldman’s epidemiological approach in terms of epistemic trust. By (...)
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  3. The Severity of the Information Gap Problem for Epistocracy: On Gibbons’s Reply.María Pía Méndez - 2023 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 12 (10):47–52.
    Adam Gibbons (2022) holds, in response to my recent paper on epistocracy (Méndez 2022), that the severity of what I identify as a very relevant epistemic problem for epistocracy is overstated. What I call the Information Gap Problem refers to the gap of information that an elite electorate of well-informed citizens would experience, with regards to what epistocrats call ‘ill-informed’ lay citizens’ preferences. In that paper, I claimed that a group of highly qualified people could be better at determining the (...)
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  4. Deferring to Expertise whilst Maintaining Autonomy.Rebecca C. H. Brown - forthcoming - Episteme:1-20.
    This paper will consider the extent to which patients' dependence on clinical expertise when making medical decisions threatens patient autonomy. I start by discussing whether or not dependence on experts is prima facie troubling for autonomy and suggest that it is not. I then go on to consider doctors' and other healthcare professionals' status as ‘medical experts’ of the relevant sort and highlight a number of ways in which their expertise is likely to be deficient. I then consider how this (...)
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  5. Overcoming Eurocentrism: Exploring Ethiopian Modernity Through Entangled Histories and Coloniality.Fasil Merawi - forthcoming - Social Epistemology.
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  6. Deepfakes, Public Announcements, and Political Mobilization.Megan Hyska - forthcoming - In Alex Worsnip (ed.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology, vol. 8. Oxford University Press.
    This paper takes up the question of how videographic public announcements (VPAs)---i.e. videos that a wide swath of the public sees and knows that everyone else can see too--- have functioned to mobilize people politically, and how the presence of deepfakes in our information environment stands to change the dynamics of this mobilization. Existing work by Regina Rini, Don Fallis and others has focused on the ways that deepfakes might interrupt our acquisition of first-order knowledge through videos. But I point (...)
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  7. Provisional Attitudes.Michele Palmira - forthcoming - In Kurt Sylvan, Matthias Steup, Ernest Sosa & Jonathan Dancy (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Epistemology (3rd edition).
  8. The Place of the Political in Emile Durkheim`s Social Epistemology: Transgression, Affect, Subjectivation.D. G. Khumaryan - 2016 - Sociology of Power 28 (4):35-56.
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  9. Carving at the Joints: Distinguishing Epistemic Wrongs from Epistemic Harms in Epistemic Injustice Contexts.Gerry Dunne & Alkis Kotsonis - forthcoming - Episteme:1-14.
    This paper examines the relatively underexplored relationship between epistemic wrongs and epistemic harms in the context of epistemic injustice. Does the presence of one always imply the presence of the other? Or, is it possible to have one without the other? Here we aim to establish a prima facie case that epistemic wrongs do not always produce epistemic harms. We argue that the epistemic wrongness of an action should never be evaluated solely based on the action's consequences, viz. the epistemic (...)
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  10. Carving at the joints: distinguishing Epistemic harms from wrongs in Epistemic Injustice Contexts.Dunne Gerry - 2024 - Episteme 1.
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  11. Review of Thomas Kelly’s Bias: A Philosophical Study. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2022, x + 288 pp. [REVIEW]Lennart B. Ackermans - 2024 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 16 (2):280–286.
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  12. Injusticia Epistémica y La Burocracia a Nivel de Calle.Jack Warman - unknown
    UN TRABAJADOR SOCIAL entorpece la tramitación de una denuncia de violencia intrafamiliar porque es mucho papeleo y cree que, si fuera real, la supuesta víctima habría abandonado a su abusador. Una policía obliga a una persona detenida a firmar una confesión bajo coacción porque tiene que cumplir una cuota. Un profesor no asigna importancia a las preguntas de una alumna porque tiene una discapacidad visible. Estas situaciones tienen en común que son ejemplos de la injusticia epistémica. ¿Cómo se pueden combatir (...)
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  13. Argumentation-induced rational issue polarisation.Felix Kopecky - 2024 - Philosophical Studies 181 (1):83-107.
    Computational models have shown how polarisation can rise among deliberating agents as they approximate epistemic rationality. This paper provides further support for the thesis that polarisation can rise under condition of epistemic rationality, but it does not depend on limitations that extant models rely on, such as memory restrictions or biased evaluation of other agents’ testimony. Instead, deliberation is modelled through agents’ purposeful introduction of arguments and their rational reactions to introductions of others. This process induces polarisation dynamics on its (...)
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  14. Transcultural Identity of Twerking: A Cultural Evolution Study of Women’s Bodily Practices of the Slavic and East African Communities.Aleksandra Łukaszewicz, Priscilla Gitonga & Kiryl Shylinhouski - forthcoming - Social Epistemology.
    Human culture is built upon nature to help humans adapt to their environment – first natural, but later natural-cultural. Cultural practices are aimed at aiding survival in changing environments, and in different settings they meet different environmental pressures, causing later changes in trajectories. According to cultural evolutionism, behaviours, ideas and artefacts are subject to inheritance, competition, accumulation of modifications, adaptation, geographical distribution, convergence and changes of function – these are mechanisms present also in biological evolution. In the following paper, we (...)
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  15. Are there counterexamples to the consistency principle?Clayton Littlejohn - forthcoming - Episteme.
    Must rational thinkers have consistent sets of beliefs? I shall argue that it can be rational for a thinker to believe a set of propositions known to be inconsistent. If this is right, an important test for a theory of rational belief is that it allows for the right kinds of inconsistency. One problem we face in trying to resolve disagreements about putative rational requirements is that parties to the disagreement might be working with different conceptions of the relevant attitudes. (...)
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  16. Against Publishing Without Belief: Fake News, Misinformation, and Perverse Publishing Incentives.Rima Basu - forthcoming - In Sandy Goldberg & Mark Walker (eds.), Attitude in Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The problem of fake news and the spread of misinformation has garnered a lot of attention in recent years. The incentives and norms that give rise to the problem, however, are not unique to journalism. Insofar as academics and journalists are working towards the same goal, i.e., publication, they are both under pressures that pervert. This chapter has two aims. First, to integrate conversations in philosophy of science, epistemology, and metaphilosophy to draw out the publishing incentives that promote analogous problems (...)
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  17. Machine Advisors: Integrating Large Language Models into Democratic Assemblies.Petr Špecián - manuscript
    Large language models (LLMs) represent the currently most relevant incarnation of artificial intelligence with respect to the future fate of democratic governance. Considering their potential, this paper seeks to answer a pressing question: Could LLMs outperform humans as expert advisors to democratic assemblies? While bearing the promise of enhanced expertise availability and accessibility, they also present challenges of hallucinations, misalignment, or value imposition. Weighing LLMs’ benefits and drawbacks compared to their human counterparts, I argue for their careful integration to augment (...)
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  18. From gender segregation to epistemic segregation: a case study of the school system in Iran.Shadi Heidarifar - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):901-922.
    In this paper, I show that there is a bidirectional relationship between gender-based social norms and gender-segregated education policies that excludes girls from knowledge production within the Iranian school system. I argue that gender segregation in education reproduces hermeneutic inequality through the reinforcement of epistemic segregation as a form of epistemic injustice. In particular, I focus on gender-based instructional epistemic injustice, which refers to a set of epistemic practices that actively exclude a student or an education professional in their capacity (...)
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  19. The Future of Double Consciousness: Epistemic Virtue, Identity, and Structural Anti-Blackness.Orlando Hawkins & Emmalon Davis - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper considers two conceptual expansions of Du Boisian double consciousness—white double consciousness (Alcoff 2015) and kaleidoscopic consciousness (Medina 2013)—both of which aim to articulate the moral-epistemic potential of cultivating double consciousness from racially dominant or other socially privileged positions. We analyze these concepts and challenge them on the grounds that they lack continuity with their Du Boisian predecessor and face problems of practical feasibility. As we show, these expansions obscure structural barriers that make white double consciousness and kaleidoscopic consciousness (...)
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  20. Trust’s Meno problem: Can the doxastic view account for the value of trust?Ross F. Patrizio - 2024 - Philosophical Psychology 37 (1):18-37.
    The doxastic view (DV) of trust maintains that trust essentially involves belief. In a recent paper, Arnon Keren (Citation2020) gestures toward a new objection to the view, labeled Trust’s Meno Problem (TMP), which calls into question the DV’s ability to explain the widely held intuition that trust has distinct and indispensable value. As of yet, there has been no attempt to take up TMP on behalf of DV. This paper aims to fill precisely this lacuna. I do so in three (...)
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  21. Academics’ Epistemological Attitudes towards Academic Social Networks and Social Media.Jevgenija Sivoronova, Aleksejs Vorobjovs & Vitālijs Raščevskis - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (1):1-28.
    Academic social networks and social media have revolutionised the way individuals gather information and express themselves, particularly in academia, science, and research. Through the lens of academics, this study aims to investigate the epistemological and psychosocial aspects of these knowledge sources. The epistemological attitude model presented a framework to delve into and reflect upon the existence of knowledge sources, comprising subjective, interactional, and knowledge dimensions. One hundred and twenty-six university academics participated in this study, including lecturers and researchers from different (...)
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  22. Epistemic Value as Attributive Goodness?Michael Vollmer - forthcoming - Episteme:1-16.
    According to insulationism, a common take on epistemic value, being of epistemic value does not entail being of value simpliciter. In this paper, I explore one version of insulationism which has so far received little attention in the literature. On this view, epistemic value does not entail value simpliciter because it is a form of attributive goodness, that is, being good as a member of a particular kind. While having a significant advantage over some other formulations of insulationism, I argue (...)
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  23. Propositional Versus Encyclopedic Epistemology and Unintentional Plagiarism.Erhan Şimşek - forthcoming - Social Epistemology.
    Unintentional plagiarism abounds at universities. The literature offers several explanations for students’ difficulties with acquiring standards of good academic practice. In this paper, I propose an alternative account: unintentional plagiarism can only be understood in the context of implicit but irreconcilable forms of knowledge. While higher education institutions mainly operate within the framework of propositional epistemology, institutions of primary and secondary education tend to furnish students with encyclopedic epistemology. Accordingly, universities and institutions of pre-college education tend to propagate conflicting assumptions (...)
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  24. Assertions: Deterrent or Handicap? A Reply to Graham (2020).Justin P. Bruner - forthcoming - Episteme.
    According to one influential tradition, to assert that p is to express a belief that p. Yet how do assertions provide strong evidence for belief? Philosophers have recently drawn on evolutionary biology to help explain the stability of assertive communication. Mitchell Green suggests that assertions are akin to biological handicaps. Peter Graham argues against the handicap view and instead claims that the norms of assertion are deterrents. Contra Graham, I argue that both mechanisms may play a role in assertive communication, (...)
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  25. The social epistemology of eating disorders: How our gaps in understanding challenge patient care.Ji-Young Lee - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    In this article, I argue that various epistemic challenges associated with eating disorders (EDs) can negatively affect the care of already marginalized patient groups with various EDs. I will first outline deficiencies in our understanding of EDs—in research, healthcare settings, and beyond. I will then illustrate with examples cases where discriminatory misconceptions about what EDs are, the presentation and treatment of EDs, and who gets EDs, instantiate obstacles for the treatment of various ED patient groups.
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  26. Who Needs to Tell the Truth? – Epistemic Injustice and Truth and Reconciliation Commissions for Minorities in Non-Transitional Societies.Kerstin Reibold - forthcoming - Episteme.
    Truth and Reconciliation Commissions (TRCs) have become a widely used tool to reconcile societies in the aftermath of widespread injustice or social and political conflict in a state. This article focuses on TRCs that take place in non-transitional societies in which the political and social structures, institutions, and power relations have largely remained in place since the time of injustice. Furthermore, it will focus on one particular injustice that TRCs try to address through the practice of truth-telling, namely the eradication (...)
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  27. Discipline and Punish: The translation of the absent or the comment to be translated.Alex Pereira De Araújo - 2021 - Academia Letters 4367:01-05.
    This comment text brings, at the end, a part of Surveiller et Punir (Discipline and Punish), which has not been translated into Portuguese and does not appear in more than 40 editions of the Brazilian translation. It is on the back cover of the original in French, as if it were an afterword, signed by the author himself, Michel Foucault, which more than 40 years ago published by Editions Gallimard, his first copies in February 1975. Two years later, the Brazilian (...)
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  28. Accuracy-based partisan epistemology: How partisanship can moderate the influence of communicated information on the beliefs of agents aiming to form true beliefs.Maarten Van Doorn - manuscript
    Under review at Social Epistemology. The normative status of partisan of epistemology has been the subject of much recent philosophical attention. It is often assumed that partisan epistemology is evidence of directionally motivated reasoning in which concerns about group membership override concerns about accuracy. I outline an alternative account which seeks to explain the data assuming people are motivated by accuracy. I argue that this theory offers a superior explanation of partisan epistemology than alternative social-benefits theories of the phenomenon. Since (...)
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  29. How Expertise is Enabled: Why Epistemic Cycles Matter to us All.Stephen J. Cowley - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):83-97.
    Rather than ask if expertise is under threat, this paper uses case studies to show how expertise is enabled. Its appearance can be traced to how the already known evokes sensibility, judging, thinking and languaging. As defined below, it draws on epistemic cycles. Using Secchi and Cowley’s (2021) 3M model, this posits a second cut between the micro and the macro. In the mesosphere, people create temporary domains or what William James (1991) calls ‘little worlds’. Within these corpora popularia, the (...)
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  30. “I’ll Show You Differences”: Skills, Creativity and Meaning.Johan Siebers & Paul Cobley - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):28-37.
    This article arises out of critical contemplation of ‘skills’ in relation to Higher Education pedagogy as it relates to the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. As the emphasis on skills dominates more and more of the discourse about pedagogy in Higher Education, the article aims to make some critical comments about the reductionist approach to education that easily becomes part of skills discourse. In addition to criticising instrumentalist deployment of ‘skills’ in Higher Education policy, the article also considers the supposedly (...)
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  31. Expertise in Non-Well-Defined Task Domains: The Case of Reading.Sarah Bro Trasmundi, Edward Baggs, Juan Toro & Sune Vork Steffensen - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):13-27.
    In this article, we discuss expertise by considering the activity of reading. Cognitive scientists have traditionally conceptualised reading as a single, well-defined task, namely the decoding of letter sequences into meaningful sequences of speech sounds. This definition captures a core feature of the reading activity at the computational level, but it is an overly narrow model of how reading behaviour occurs in the real world. We propose a more expansive model of expertise. In our view, expertise in general is best (...)
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  32. Becoming a Knower: Fabricating Knowing Through Coaction.Marie-Theres Fester-Seeger - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):49-69.
    This paper takes a step back from considering expertise as a social phenomenon. One should investigate how people become knowers before assigning expertise to a person’s actions. Using a temporal-sensitive systemic ethnography, a case study shows how undergraduate students form a social system out of necessity as they fabricate knowledge around an empty wording like ‘conscious living’. Tracing the engagement with students and tutor to recursive moments of coaction, I argue that, through the subtleties of bodily movements, people incorporate the (...)
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  33. Designing an Expert-Setting for Interdisciplinary Dialogue: Literary Texts as Boundary Objects.Karin Kukkonen - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):38-48.
    While literature is often used as a source of examples and illustrations across disciplines, literary studies tends to be underrepresented in interdisciplinary exchanges. Perhaps the reason lies in a lack of understanding what actually is the expertise of literary studies and how this can be useful in interdisciplinary settings. In this article, I propose to outline the expertise of literary scholars through concepts of 4E cognition and to devise a proposal for how such expertise could successfully shape the epistemic common (...)
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  34. Introduction to the Special Issue: “Expertise, Semiotics and Interactivity”.Charles Lassiter & Sarah Bro Trasmundi - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):1-12.
    In this article, we offer an overview of the philosophical and psychological literatures on expertise. Work so far has failed to engage with recent work in embodied and encultured cognition--in particular the notions of interactivity and semiosis. We suggest how bringing these concepts on board reveals new areas of research concerning the philosophy and psychology of expertise. We conclude with a brief synopsis of each paper.
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  35. Reading the Signs: From Dyadic to Triadic Views for Identifying Experts.Charles Lassiter - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):98-109.
    A naturalistic approach to expert-identification begins by asking, ‘how do novices pick out putative experts?’ Alvin Goldman and Elizabeth Anderson, representing a fairly common approach, consider agents’ psychological biases as well as social situatedness. As good as this is, culture’s role in shaping cognitive mechanisms is neglected. An explanatory framework that works well to accommodate culturally-sensitive mechanisms is Peircean semiotics. His triadic approach holds that signs signify objects to interpreters. Applying the triadic model to expert-identification: novices interpret signs of expertise (...)
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  36. Apology for an Average Believer: Wagered Belief and Information Environments.Richard Kenneth Atkins - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):110-118.
    Some persons who believe provably false claims – such as that there were significant voter irregularities in the 2020 election – may nevertheless be evidentially rational for holding their false beliefs. I consider a person I call our average believer. In her daily life, she incidentally gathers evidence favoring the hypothesis that there were significant voter irregularities, but she does not investigate the matter. Her information environment, moreover, is such that it accidentally (through no fault of her own) excludes counterevidence (...)
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  37. Enacting Practices: Perception, Expertise and Enlanguaged Affordances.Rasmus Gahrn-Andersen - 2024 - Social Epistemology 38 (1):70-82.
    The paper thematizes basic content-free cognition in human social practices. It explores the enlanguaged dimension of skilled practical doings and expertise by taking the minimal case of concept-based perception as its starting point. Having made a case for considering such activity as free of mental content, I argue in favor of the abolishment of the distinction between truth-telling and social consensus, thus questioning the assumption held by proponents of Radical Enactivism, namely that truth and accuracy conditions are restricted to content-involving (...)
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  38. How do lines of inquiry unfold? Insights from journalism.Susanna Siegel - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Epistemology: Special Issue on Applied Epistemology.
    I analyze a type of practice related to inquiry: treating things as zetetically relevant to questions, and argue that this practice is a central normatively evaluable way to extend lines of inquiry. My strategy is to introduce the practice and its normative features by examining its relationship to something already well-understood: the ways that news stories produced by journalists frame events. I then argue that the same core zetetic practice can be found across domains, just not in journalism. Finding the (...)
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  39. Mechanistic Explanation, Interdisciplinary Integration and Interpersonal Social Coordination.Matti Sarkia - forthcoming - Social Epistemology.
    Prominent research programs dealing with the nature and mechanisms of interpersonal social coordination have emerged in cognitive science, developmental psychology and evolutionary anthropology. I argue that the mechanistic approach to explanation in contemporary philosophy of science can facilitate interdisciplinary integration and division of labor between these different disciplinary research programs. By distinguishing phenomenal models from mechanistic models and structural decomposition from functional decomposition in the process of mechanism discovery, I argue that behavioral and cognitive scientists can make interlocking contributions to (...)
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  40. Algorithmic Profiling as a Source of Hermeneutical Injustice.Silvia Milano & Carina Prunkl - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-19.
    It is well-established that algorithms can be instruments of injustice. It is less frequently discussed, however, how current modes of AI deployment often make the very discovery of injustice difficult, if not impossible. In this article, we focus on the effects of algorithmic profiling on epistemic agency. We show how algorithmic profiling can give rise to epistemic injustice through the depletion of epistemic resources that are needed to interpret and evaluate certain experiences. By doing so, we not only demonstrate how (...)
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  41. Radio Comunitaria Campesina.Analía Santander Y. Daniel Gutierrez - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  42. Praxis epistémicas emancipatorias.María José Vila Costa Y. Mariano Harracá Di Lorenzo - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  43. El discurso filosófico de Walter Kohan, la filosofía con niños/as y las posibilidades transformadoras de la filosofía.Martina E. Victoria - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  44. Fundamentos hermenéuticos de la investigación social.Esteban Vergalito - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  45. Las epistemologías feministas como base para la construcción de conocimientos en ciencias sociales.Mariángel Elizondo - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  46. Para una comunicación social decolonial.Luis Tomas - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  47. Mil novecientos ochenta y cuatro.Marco G. Mallamaci - 2021 - In Esteban Vergalito & Marco G. Mallamaci (eds.), Praxis, conocimiento y emancipación: indagaciones de epistemología política. Editorial UNSJ.
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  48. Ḥuṣūn al-takhalluf: qirāʼāt fī ālīyāt al-sayṭarah al-thaqāfīyah: al-takhalluf, al-uṣūlīyāt, al-taṭarruf.Yūsuf Huraymah - 2022 - Miṣr al-Jadīdah, al-Qāhirah: al-Maktab al-ʻArabī lil-Maʻārif.
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  49. L'expertise sans peine: traité d'excellence ostentatoire en toutes choses ; suivi de, Paradoxes de l'expertise.Sebastian Dieguez - 2023 - Paris, France: Eliott éditions. Edited by Nicolas Gauvrit & S. Dieguez.
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  50. Social Structure and Epistemic Privilege. Reconstructing Lukács’s Standpoint Theory.Titus Stahl - 2023 - Análisis 10 (2):319-349.
    Lukács is widely recognized as being the first critical theorist to have explicitly developed the idea of a “standpoint theory”. According to such a theory, members of oppressed groups enjoy an epistemic privilege regarding the nature of their oppression. However, there is no agreement regarding what precise argument Lukács offers for his claims regarding the alleged epistemic privilege of the working class. Additionally, it remains unclear whether later feminist standpoint theories share any continuity with Lukács’s argument. In this analysis, I (...)
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