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  1. “She was finally mine”: the moral experience of families in the context of trisomy 13 and 18– a scoping review with thematic analysis. [REVIEW]Maxwell J. Smith, Randi Zlotnik Shaul, Gail Teachman & Zoe Ritchie - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-20.
    IntroductionThe value of a short life characterized by disability has been hotly debated in the literature on fetal and neonatal outcomes.MethodsWe conducted a scoping review to summarize the available empirical literature on the experiences of families in the context of trisomy 13 and 18 (T13/18) with subsequent thematic analysis of the 17 included articles.FindingsThemes constructed include (1) Pride as Resistance, (2) Negotiating Normalcy and (3) The Significance of Time.InterpretationOur thematic analysis was guided by the moral experience framework conceived by Hunt (...)
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  2. Medical Ethics.Raimondo G. Russo - 2023 - Springer Nature Switzerland.
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  3. Layered vulnerability and researchers’ responsibilities: learning from research involving Kenyan adolescents living with perinatal HIV infection.Vicki Marsh, Amina Abubakar, Maureen Kelley, Alun Davies, Rita Njeru, Gladys Sanga, Scholastica M. Zakayo, Anderson Charo, Sassy Molyneux & Mary Kimani - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1).
    BackgroundCarefully planned research is critical to developing policies and interventions that counter physical, psychological and social challenges faced by young people living with HIV/aids, without increasing burdens. Such studies, however, must navigate a ‘vulnerability paradox’, since including potentially vulnerable groups also risks unintentionally worsening their situation. Through embedded social science research, linked to a cohort study involving Adolescents Living with HIV/aids (ALH) in Kenya, we develop an account of researchers’ responsibilities towards young people, incorporating concepts of vulnerability, resilience, and agency (...)
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  4. Cross-sectional analysis of financial relationships between board certified allergists and the pharmaceutical industry in Japan.Yuki Senoo & Anju Murayama - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1).
    BackgroundFinancial interactions between pharmaceutical companies and physicians lead to conflicts of interest. This study examines the extent and trends of non-research payments made by pharmaceutical companies to board-certified allergists in Japan between 2016 and 2020.MethodsA retrospective analysis of disclosed payment data from pharmaceutical companies affiliated with the Japanese Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association was conducted. The study focused on non-research payments for lecturing, consulting, and manuscript drafting made to board-certified allergists from 2016 to 2020. We performed descriptive analyses on payment data. Trends (...)
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  5. A bioethical perspective on the meanings behind a wish to hasten death: a meta-ethnographic review.Paulo J. Borges, Pablo Hernández-Marrero & Sandra Martins Pereira - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-35.
    Background The expressions of a “wish to hasten death” or “wish to die” raise ethical concerns and challenges. These expressions are related to ethical principles intertwined within the field of medical ethics, particularly in end-of-life care. Although some reviews were conducted about this topic, none of them provides an in-depth analysis of the meanings behind the “wish to hasten death/die” based specifically on the ethical principles of autonomy, dignity, and vulnerability. The aim of this review is to understand if and (...)
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  6. INTRODUCTION TO PHILIPPA FOOT's DILEMMAS ON MEDICAL ETHICS.Inna Savynska - 2021 - The Days of Science of the Faculty of Philosophy – 2021 International Scientific Conference 1:307-309.
    Medical ethics is a branch of applied ethics that is deeply connected with the philosophy of medicine. Medical ethics mainly focuses on the moral issues of medicine. It also deals with the problems of euthanasia, abortion, clinical trials, health care and well-being. There are many approaches or moral theories inside applied ethics. They give moral reasons for medic’s actions, especially in difficult or controversial situations. Among the numerous contemporary ethical theories, the theory of realism by English philosopher Philippa Foot takes (...)
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  7. Nursing's professional character: A chimera?Martin Lipscomb - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (2):e12477.
    Does nursing possess a character? The idea that professions have characters is hard to sustain, and the possibility that nursing as a collectively or occupation lacks a character is worth considering. To this end it is argued that absent robust theoretical and/or evidential scaffolding it is implausible to suppose that nursing has an objectively real (reality describing) character, and if ‘nursing's character’ is chimeric or illusory, aspects of our conception of professionalism require reappraisal. Specifically, traits and values that attach to (...)
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  8. Medical ethics education as translational bioethics.Peter D. Young, Andrew N. Papanikitas & John Spicer - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):262-269.
    We suggest that in the particular context of medical education, ethics can be considered in a similar way to other kinds of knowledge that are categorised and shaped by academics in the context of wider society. Moreover, the study of medical ethics education is translational in a manner loosely analogous to the study of medical education as adjunct to translational medicine. Some have suggested there is merit in the idea that much as translational research attempts to connect the laboratory scientist's (...)
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  9. Igwebuike: an African concept for an inclusive medical ethics.Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues & Ada Agada - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):219-220.
    _Igwebuike_ is a traditional knowledge system undergirded by the metaphysical assumption that the world is a totality of interconnected and interrelated entities. 1–4 African scholars in West Africa often invoke _igwebuike_ to make sense of African ethical, social and political perspectives that are grounded in the theory of Afro-communitarianism. Afro-communitarianism is primarily a socioethical theory that is concerned with the articulation of the moral relationship between the individual and the community. The term _igwebuike_ is derived from the Igbo root words (...)
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  10. First among equals? Adaptive preferences and the limits of autonomy in medical ethics.Susan Pennings & Xavier Symons - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):212-218.
    Respect for patient autonomy is a central principle of medical ethics. However, there are important unresolved questions about the characteristics of an autonomous decision, and whether some autonomous preferences should be subject to more scrutiny than others. In this paper, we consider whether _inappropriately adaptive preferences_—preferences that are based on and that may perpetuate social injustice—should be categorised as autonomous in a way that gives them normative authority. Some philosophers have argued that inappropriately adaptive preferences do not have normative authority, (...)
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  11. The revised International Code of Medical Ethics: responses to some important questions.Ramin W. Parsa-Parsi, Raanan Gillon & Urban Wiesing - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):179-180.
    We thank our commentators for their thoughtful responses to our paper 1 covering among other issues the relationships of ethics law and professional codes, the tensions between ethical universalism and cultural relativism and the phenomenon of moral judgement required when ethical norms conflict, including the norms of patient care versus obligations to others both now and in the future. Although the comments deserve more extensive discussion, in what follows we respond briefly to specific aspects of each commentary and remind readers (...)
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  12. Can medical ethics truly be independent of law?Abeezar I. Sarela - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):177-178.
    Parsa-Parsi _et al_ assert that the International Code of Medical Ethics (ICoME) provides a professional standard that overrides conflicting national legal norms. 1 While this claim is made in the context of laws that require doctors to participate in ‘acts of torture, or other cruel, inhuman, or degrading practices and punishments’ (para10 of ICoME), the underlying premise that medical ethics supersedes law requires scrutiny. It is clear that medical ethics and law are linked inextricably, but there is unresolved debate about (...)
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  13. Complication for a greener medical ethics code: assisted reproduction.Seppe Segers & Michiel De Proost - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):169-170.
    Paragraph 12 of the revised International Code of Medical Ethics (ICoME) states that ‘the physician should strive to practise medicine in ways that are environmentally sustainable with a view to minimising environmental health risks to current and future generations.’ 1 This emphasis on environmental sustainability is in line with popular discourse as well growing scholarly attention in medical ethics for healthcare’s contribution to climate change. Recent research analyses, for instance, the ‘greening’ of informed consent and related bioethical principles. 2 3 (...)
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  14. The revised International Code of Medical Ethics: an exercise in international professional ethical self-regulation.Ramin W. Parsa-Parsi, Raanan Gillon & Urban Wiesing - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):163-168.
    The World Medical Association (WMA), the global representation of the medical profession, first adopted the International Code of Medical Ethics (ICoME) in 1949 to outline the professional duties of physicians to patients, other physicians and health professionals, themselves and society as a whole. The ICoME recently underwent a major 4-year revision process, culminating in its unanimous adoption by the WMA General Assembly in October 2022 in Berlin. This article describes and discusses the ICoME, its revision process, the controversial and uncontroversial (...)
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  15. The role of bioethics services in paediatric intensive care units: a qualitative descriptive study.Denise Alexander, Mary Quirke, Jo Greene, Lorna Cassidy, Carol Hilliard & Maria Brenner - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-12.
    Background There is considerable variation in the functionality of bioethical services in different institutions and countries for children in hospital, despite new challenges due to increasing technology supports for children with serious illness and medical complexity. We aimed to understand how bioethics services address bioethical concerns that are increasingly encountered in paediatric intensive care. Methods A qualitative descriptive design was used to describe clinician’s perspectives on the functionality of clinical bioethics services for paediatric intensive care units. Clinicians who were members (...)
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  16. Moral approval of xenotransplantation in Egypt: associations with religion, attitudes towards animals and demographic factors.Gabriel Andrade, Eid AboHamza, Yasmeen Elsantil, AlaaEldin Ayoub & Dalia Bedewy - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-15.
    Xenotransplantation has great potential as an alternative to alleviate the shortage of organs for donation. However, given that the animal most suited for xenotransplantation is the pig, there are concerns that people in Muslim countries may be more hesitant to morally approve of these procedures. In this study, the moral approval of xenotransplantation was assessed in a group of 895 participants in Egypt. The results showed that religiosity itself does not predict moral approval of xenotransplantation, but religious identity does, as (...)
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  17. Evaluating the understanding of the ethical and moral challenges of Big Data and AI among Jordanian medical students, physicians in training, and senior practitioners: a cross-sectional study.Abdallah Al-Ani, Abdallah Rayyan, Ahmad Maswadeh, Hala Sultan, Ahmad Alhammouri, Hadeel Asfour, Tariq Alrawajih, Sarah Al Sharie, Fahed Al Karmi, Ahmad Azzam, Asem Mansour & Maysa Al-Hussaini - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-14.
    Aims To examine the understanding of the ethical dilemmas associated with Big Data and artificial intelligence (AI) among Jordanian medical students, physicians in training, and senior practitioners. Methods We implemented a literature-validated questionnaire to examine the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the target population during the period between April and August 2023. Themes of ethical debate included privacy breaches, consent, ownership, augmented biases, epistemology, and accountability. Participants’ responses were showcased using descriptive statistics and compared between groups using t-test or ANOVA. (...)
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  18. “That’s just Future Medicine” - a qualitative study on users’ experiences of symptom checker apps.Regina Müller, Malte Klemmt, Roland Koch, Hans-Jörg Ehni, Tanja Henking, Elisabeth Langmann, Urban Wiesing & Robert Ranisch - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-19.
    Background Symptom checker apps (SCAs) are mobile or online applications for lay people that usually have two main functions: symptom analysis and recommendations. SCAs ask users questions about their symptoms via a chatbot, give a list with possible causes, and provide a recommendation, such as seeing a physician. However, it is unclear whether the actual performance of a SCA corresponds to the users’ experiences. This qualitative study investigates the subjective perspectives of SCA users to close the empirical gap identified in (...)
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  19. Transformative medical ethics: A framework for changing practice according to normative–ethical requirements.Katja Kuehlmeyer, Bianca Jansky, Marcel Mertz & Georg Marckmann - 2023 - Bioethics 38 (3):241-251.
    We propose a step‐by‐step methodological framework of translational bioethics that aims at changing medical practice according to normative–ethical requirements, which we will thus call “transformative medical ethics.” The framework becomes especially important when there is a gap between widely acknowledged, ethically justified normative claims and their realization in the practice of biomedicine and technology (ought–is gap). Building on prior work on translational bioethics, the framework maps a process with six different phases and 12 distinct translational steps. The steps involve various (...)
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  20. Perceptions of COVID-19 patients in the use of bioethical principles and the physician-patient relationship: a qualitative approach.Guillermo Cantú Quintanilla, Irma Eloisa Gómez-Guerrero, Nuria Aguiñaga-Chiñas, Mariana López Cervantes, Ignacio David Jaramillo Flores, Pedro Alonso Slon Rodríguez, Carlos Francisco Bravo Vargas, America Arroyo-Valerio & María del Carmen García-Higuera - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1).
    Background The COVID-19 pandemic has influenced the approach to the health-disease system, raising the question about the principles of bioethics present in physician–patient relations. The principles while widely accepted may not be sufficient for a comprehensive ethical analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the perception of these principles and the physician–patient relationship during a hospital stay through a qualitative approach. Method Sixteen semi-structured interviews took place to know the patients’ perception during their 2020 hospitalization for COVID-19. (...)
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  21. Cross-cultural perspectives on intelligent assistive technology in dementia care: comparing Israeli and German experts’ attitudes.Hanan AboJabel, Johannes Welsch & Silke Schicktanz - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1).
    Background Despite the great benefits of intelligent assistive technology (IAT) for dementia care – for example, the enhanced safety and increased independence of people with dementia and their caregivers – its practical adoption is still limited. The social and ethical issues pertaining to IAT in dementia care, shaped by factors such as culture, may explain these limitations. However, most studies have focused on understanding these issues within one cultural setting only. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore and (...)
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  22. Publishing in the field of medical ethics: From describing ethical issues to ethical analysis.Jonathan Lewis - 2024 - Clinical Ethics 19 (1):1-2.
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  23. Conscientious objection and barriers to abortion within a specific regional context - an expert interview study.Robin Krawutschke, Tania Pastrana & Dagmar Schmitz - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1).
    Background While most countries that allow abortion on women’s request also grant physicians a right to conscientious objection (CO), this has proven to constitute a potential barrier to abortion access. Conscientious objection is regarded as an understudied phenomenon the effects of which have not yet been examined in Germany. Based on expert interviews, this study aims to exemplarily reconstruct the processes of abortion in a mid-sized city in Germany, and to identify potential effects of conscientious objection. Methods Five semi-structured interviews (...)
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  24. Regulatory Policies and Medical Ethics of Medical Tourism in Developing Countries.Sursinh Barad, Kesha Bhadiyadra, Sushman Sharma & Bhupinder Chaudhary - 2024 - In Bhupinder Chaudhary, Dinesh Bhatia, Mahesh Patel, Sunaina Singh & Sushman Sharma (eds.), Medical Tourism in Developing Countries: A contemporary approach. Springer Nature Singapore. pp. 215-228.
    Medical tourism (also called medical travel or health tourism) refers to the practice of traveling across international borders to obtain healthcare. The main motivation that attracts foreign patients is the low cost of medical treatment. Other factors included excellent medical facilities and cultural and religious similarities. Medical tourism also helpful for developing country and help to strengthening of health services to developing countries. Therefore, The Ministry of India, Tourism and Government has taken several steps to promote as a Medical and (...)
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  25. Analyzing the composition of the editorial boards in high-impact medical ethics journals: a survey study.Wei Li, Xiyan Zhao, Tianlin Wen, Xingxuan Li, Donghua Liu & Zhiwei Jia - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundThe underrepresentation of scholarly works from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in academic literature is a documented concern, attributed partly to editorial biases. This trend, prevalent across various disciplines, has been less explored in the context of medical ethics journals. This study aimed to examine the composition of editorial board members (EBM) in high-impact medical ethics journals and to evaluate the extent of international diversity within these editorial teams.MethodsThis study incorporated an analysis of 16 high-impact medical ethics journals. Information regarding (...)
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  26. Les chemins d'Esculape: histoire de la pensée médicale.Maurice Tubiana - 1995 - [Paris]: Flammarion.
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  27. Ethical dilemmas in prioritizing patients for scarce radiotherapy resources.Cyprien Shyirambere, Vincent K. Cubaka, Scott A. Triedman, Lawrence N. Shulman, Katherine Van Loon, Nicaise Nsabimana, Jean Bosco Bigirimana, Grace Umutesi, Cam Nguyen, Espérance Mutoniwase, Anita Ho & Rebecca J. DeBoer - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1).
    BackgroundRadiotherapy is an essential component of cancer treatment, yet many countries do not have adequate capacity to serve all patients who would benefit from it. Allocation systems are needed to guide patient prioritization for radiotherapy in resource-limited contexts. These systems should be informed by allocation principles deemed relevant to stakeholders. This study explores the ethical dilemmas and views of decision-makers engaged in real-world prioritization of scarce radiotherapy resources at a cancer center in Rwanda in order to identify relevant principles.MethodsSemi-structured interviews (...)
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  28. Disease: An Ill-Founded Concept at Odds with the Principle of Patient-Centred Medicine.Arandjelovic Ognjen - forthcoming - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
    Background: Despite the at least decades long record of philosophical recognition and interest, the intricacy of the deceptively familiar appearing concepts of ‘disease’, ‘disorder’, ‘disability’, etc., has only recently begun showing itself with clarity in the popular discourse wherein its newly emerging prominence stems from the liberties and restrictions contingent upon it. Whether a person is deemed to be afflicted by a disease or a disorder governs their ability to access health care, be it free at the point of use (...)
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  29. Questionable research practices of medical and dental faculty in Pakistan – a confession.Ayesha Fahim, Aysha Sadaf, Fahim Haider Jafari, Kashif Siddique & Ahsan Sethi - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-8.
    Purpose Intellectual honesty and integrity are the cornerstones of conducting any form of research. Over the last few years, scholars have shown great concerns over questionable research practices (QRPs) in academia. This study aims to investigate the questionable research practices amongst faculty members of medical and dental colleges in Pakistan. Method A descriptive multi-institutional online survey was conducted from June-August 2022. Based on previous studies assessing research misconduct, 43 questionable research practices in four domains: Data collection & storage, Data analysis, (...)
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  30. Zhong yi yun qi xue.Li Yang - 1999 - Beijing: Beijing ke xue ji shu chu ban she.
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  31. Is pregnancy a disease? A normative approach.Anna Smajdor & Joona Räsänen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In this paper, we identify some key features of what makes something a disease, and consider whether these apply to pregnancy. We argue that there are some compelling grounds for regarding pregnancy as a disease. Like a disease, pregnancy affects the health of the pregnant person, causing a range of symptoms from discomfort to death. Like a disease, pregnancy can be treated medically. Like a disease, pregnancy is caused by a pathogen, an external organism invading the host’s body. Like a (...)
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  32. Jing wei sheng ming: sheng ming, yi xue yu ren wen guan huai de dui hua.Yifang Wang - 2000 - Nanjing: Jiangsu ren min chu ban she.
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  33. Defining dignity in higher education as an alternative to requiring ‘Trigger Warnings’.Gordon MacLaren - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12474.
    This article examines trigger warnings, particularly the call for trigger warnings on university campuses, and from a Levinasian and Kantian ethical perspective, and addresses the question: When, if ever, are trigger warnings helpful to student's learning? The nursing curriculum is developed with key stakeholders and regulatory bodies to ensure graduate nurses are competent to deliver a high standard of care to patients and clients. Practical teaching practice and published research has uncovered an increasing use of ‘Trigger Warnings’ before a topic (...)
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  34. What Makes a Medical Intervention Invasive: A Reply to Commentaries.Gabriel De Marco, Jannieke Simons, Lisa Forsberg & Thomas Douglas - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    We are grateful to the commentators for their close reading of our article1 and for their challenging and interesting responses to it. We do not have space to respond to all of the objections that they raise, so in this reply, we address only a selection of them. Some commentaries question the usefulness of developing an account of the sort we provide,2 or of revising the Standard Account (SA) in doing so.3–5 Our schema is intended to provide a framework for (...)
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  35. A Collection of Scenarios in Military Medical Ethics to Support Training and Research.Daniel Https://Orcidorg Messelken - 2018 - .
    Scenarios are a key tool for education, training and research in ethics. The presented collection of scenarios in military medical ethics constitutes a valuable resource for trainers and researchers. It shall support deploying military medical personnel and those who organise training and education to better prepare for missions. To achieve this aim, the MME scenario collection • collects and publishes experiences, reports, and scenarios in a searchable database and • provides an opportunity for those returning from missions to (anonymously) contribute (...)
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  36. Large language models in medical ethics: useful but not expert.Andrea Ferrario & Nikola Biller-Andorno - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Large language models (LLMs) have now entered the realm of medical ethics. In a recent study, Balaset alexamined the performance of GPT-4, a commercially available LLM, assessing its performance in generating responses to diverse medical ethics cases. Their findings reveal that GPT-4 demonstrates an ability to identify and articulate complex medical ethical issues, although its proficiency in encoding the depth of real-world ethical dilemmas remains an avenue for improvement. Investigating the integration of LLMs into medical ethics decision-making appears to be (...)
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  37. Integrating ethics in AI development: a qualitative study.Laura Arbelaez Ossa, Giorgia Lorenzini, Stephen R. Milford, David Shaw, Bernice S. Elger & Michael Rost - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-11.
    Background While the theoretical benefits and harms of Artificial Intelligence (AI) have been widely discussed in academic literature, empirical evidence remains elusive regarding the practical ethical challenges of developing AI for healthcare. Bridging the gap between theory and practice is an essential step in understanding how to ethically align AI for healthcare. Therefore, this research examines the concerns and challenges perceived by experts in developing ethical AI that addresses the healthcare context and needs. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 41 (...)
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  38. Exploring the potential utility of AI large language models for medical ethics: an expert panel evaluation of GPT-4.Michael Balas, Jordan Joseph Wadden, Philip C. Hébert, Eric Mathison, Marika D. Warren, Victoria Seavilleklein, Daniel Wyzynski, Alison Callahan, Sean A. Crawford, Parnian Arjmand & Edsel B. Ing - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (2):90-96.
    Integrating large language models (LLMs) like GPT-4 into medical ethics is a novel concept, and understanding the effectiveness of these models in aiding ethicists with decision-making can have significant implications for the healthcare sector. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of GPT-4 in responding to complex medical ethical vignettes and to gauge its utility and limitations for aiding medical ethicists. Using a mixed-methods, cross-sectional survey approach, a panel of six ethicists assessed LLM-generated responses to eight (...)
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  39. Generative AI and medical ethics: the state of play.Hazem Zohny, Sebastian Porsdam Mann, Brian D. Earp & John McMillan - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (2):75-76.
    Since their public launch, a little over a year ago, large language models (LLMs) have inspired a flurry of analysis about what their implications might be for medical ethics, and for society more broadly. 1 Much of the recent debate has moved beyond categorical evaluations of the permissibility or impermissibility of LLM use in different general contexts (eg, at work or school), to more fine-grained discussions of the criteria that should govern their appropriate use in specific domains or towards certain (...)
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  40. Persons or datapoints?: Ethics, artificial intelligence, and the participatory turn in mental health research.Joshua August Skorburg, Kieran O'Doherty & Phoebe Friesen - 2024 - American Psychologist 79 (1):137-149.
    This article identifies and examines a tension in mental health researchers’ growing enthusiasm for the use of computational tools powered by advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML). Although there is increasing recognition of the value of participatory methods in science generally and in mental health research specifically, many AI/ML approaches, fueled by an ever-growing number of sensors collecting multimodal data, risk further distancing participants from research processes and rendering them as mere vectors or collections of data points. The (...)
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  41. Compliance with research ethics in epidemiological studies targeted to conflict-affected areas in Western Ethiopia: validity of informed consent (VIC) by information comprehension and voluntariness (ICV).Nicki Tiffin, Anja Bedeker, Michelle Nichols, Lami Bayisa, Eba Abdisa, Bizuneh Wakuma, Mekdes Yilma & Gemechu Tiruneh - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundThe conduct of research is critical to advancing human health. However, there are issues of ethical concern specific to the design and conduct of research in conflict settings. Conflict-affected countries often lack strong platform to support technical guidance and monitoring of research ethics, which may lead to the use of divergent ethical standards some of which are poorly elaborated and loosely enforced. Despite the growing concern about ethical issues in research, there is a dearth of information about ethical compliance in (...)
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  42. Ethics rounds in the ambulance service: a qualitative evaluation.Catharina Frank, Andreas Rantala, Anders Svensson, Anders Sterner, Jessica Green, Anders Bremer & Bodil Holmberg - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-10.
    Background It is a common ethical challenge for ambulance clinicians to care for patients with impaired decision-making capacities while assessing and determining the degree of decision-making ability and considering ethical values. Ambulance clinicians’ ethical competence seems to be increasingly important in coping with such varied ethical dilemmas. Ethics rounds is a model designed to promote the development of ethical competence among clinicians. While standard in other contexts, to the best of our knowledge, it has not been applied within the ambulance (...)
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  43. Emily's struggle for dignity: An idiographic case study of a woman with multiple sclerosis.Lucia Podolinská & Juraj Čáp - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12470.
    Dignity is one of the essential values and central concepts in nursing care. Dignity can be threatened due to radical life changes; therefore, this idiographic case study aimed to explore the sense of dignity experienced by a woman with multiple sclerosis. An interpretative phenomenological analysis was adopted, using data collected through a face‐to‐face semistructured interview with Emily, a 45‐year‐old woman. The study was approved by the local ethics committee. Six personal experiential themes were identified: To be ruled by a sick (...)
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  44. African philosophy and nursing: A potential twain that shall meet?Jonathan Bayuo - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12472.
    Undoubtedly, the discipline of nursing has been influenced extensively by both Western and Eastern/Asian philosophies. What remains unknown or, perhaps, poorly articulated is the potential influence of African philosophy on the onto‐epistemology of nursing. As a starting point, this article sought to examine the core claims of African philosophy and how they may offer new meanings to the metaparadigm domains of interest in the discipline of nursing. At the core of African philosophy is the notion of personhood (which is distinguished (...)
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  45. A visionary platform for decolonization: The Red Deal.Mohamad H. Al-Chami, Wendy Gifford & Veldon Coburn - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12471.
    In this study, we discuss the colonial project as an eliminatory structure of indigenous ways of knowing and doing that is built into Canadian social and health institutions. We elaborate on the role nursing plays in maintaining systemic racism, marginalization and discrimination of Indigenous Peoples. Based on historical practices and present‐day circumstances, we argue that changing language in research and school curriculums turns decolonization into what Tuck and Yang call a ‘metaphor’. Rather, we propose decolonization as a political project where (...)
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  46. The place of philosophy in nursing.Agness C. Tembo - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12473.
    Philosophy adds humanness to nursing and facilitates holistic care. Philosophies like Ubuntu which purports that a person is only a person through other people and emphasises community cohesion and caring for each other can add humanness to nursing. Because Ubuntu validates subjective experience and its meaning in the lifeworld, it exemplifies the basis of holistic and individualised caring in nursing. Although nurses can make their own philosophy through critical reflexivity, the convergent point is the goal of meaningful caring that is, (...)
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  47. Mongolian philosophical underpinnings of well‐being: Mythology, shamanism and Mongolian Buddhism (before the development of modern nursing).Buyandelger Batmunkh & Munguntuul Enkhbat - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12469.
    Mongolian philosophical underpinnings of well‐being were expressed in the form of mythology, shamanism and Mongolian Buddhism before the development of modern nursing in Mongolia. Among these forms, the philosophical underpinnings of well‐being, mythology and shamanism were formed as a result of the roots of Mongolian philosophy, whereas Buddhism spread relatively late. As a result of Mongolian mythology, an alternative approach called dom zasal was formed, and it remains one of the important foundations of the idea of well‐being among people. Among (...)
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  48. Gender influences on caring, dignity and well‐being in older person care: A systematic literature review and thematic synthesis.Lamprini M. Xiarchi, Kristina Nässén, Lina Palmér, Fiona Cowdell & Elisabeth Lindberg - 2024 - Nursing Philosophy 25 (1):e12467.
    Globally, healthcare has become dominated by women nurses. Gender is also known to impact the way people are cared for in various healthcare systems. Considering gender from the perspective of how lived bodies are positioned through the structural relations of institutions and processes, this systematic review aims to explore the meaning of gender in the caring relationship between the nurse and the older person through a synthesis of available empirical data published from 1993 to 2022. CINAHL, PUBMED, EMBASE and Web (...)
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  49. AI-produced certainties in health care: current and future challenges.Max Tretter, Tabea Ott & Peter Dabrock - 2023 - AI and Ethics 1.
    Since uncertainty is a major challenge in medicine and bears the risk of causing incorrect diagnoses and harmful treatment, there are many efforts to tackle it. For some time, AI technologies have been increasingly implemented in medicine and used to reduce medical uncertainties. What initially seems desirable, however, poses challenges. We use a multimethod approach that combines philosophical inquiry, conceptual analysis, and ethical considerations to identify key challenges that arise when AI is used for medical certainty purposes. We identify several (...)
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  50. AI-driven decision support systems and epistemic reliance: a qualitative study on obstetricians’ and midwives’ perspectives on integrating AI-driven CTG into clinical decision making.Rachel Dlugatch, Antoniya Georgieva & Angeliki Kerasidou - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-11.
    Background Given that AI-driven decision support systems (AI-DSS) are intended to assist in medical decision making, it is essential that clinicians are willing to incorporate AI-DSS into their practice. This study takes as a case study the use of AI-driven cardiotography (CTG), a type of AI-DSS, in the context of intrapartum care. Focusing on the perspectives of obstetricians and midwives regarding the ethical and trust-related issues of incorporating AI-driven tools in their practice, this paper explores the conditions that AI-driven CTG (...)
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