Related categories

19470 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 19470
Material to categorize
  1. Twin Pregnancy, Fetal Reduction and the 'All or Nothing Problem’.Joona Räsänen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):101-105.
    Fetal reduction is the practice of reducing the number of fetuses in a multiple pregnancy, such as quadruplets, to a twin or singleton pregnancy. Use of assisted reproductive technologies increases the likelihood of multiple pregnancies, and many fetal reductions are done after in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer, either because of social or health-related reasons. In this paper, I apply Joe Horton’s all or nothing problem to the ethics of fetal reduction in the case of a twin pregnancy. I argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Surrogate Perspectives on a Patient Preference Predictor: Good Idea, But I Should Decide How It Is Used.Dana Howard & David Wendler Dana Howard, Allan Rivlin, Philip Candilis, Neal Dickert, Claire Drolen, Benjamin Krohmal, Mark Pavlick - forthcoming - AJOB Empirical Bioethics.
    Background: Current practice frequently fails to provide care consistent with the preferences of decisionally-incapacitated patients. It also imposes significant emotional burden on their surrogates. Algorithmic-based patient preference predictors (PPPs) have been proposed as a possible way to address these two concerns. While previous research found that patients strongly support the use of PPPs, the views of surrogates are unknown. The present study thus assessed the views of experienced surrogates regarding the possible use of PPPs as a means to help make (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Medical Ethics Through the Star Trek Lens.James Hughes & John Lantos - 2001 - Literature and Medicine 1 (20):26-38.
    Star Trek scripts have often grappled with dilemmas of medical ethics. The most explicitly medical-ethics-oriented Star Trek episode is named, aptly enough, “Ethics.” The script was written by Sara Charno and Stuart Charno, authors of two other Star Trek episodes. “Ethics” first aired on 2 March 1992. In the fall of 1992, we began to use this “Ethics” episode to motivate discussions in our first-year medical students’ course on medical ethics and the doctor-patient relationship. We asked students to write essays (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. A Nietzschean Critique of Liberal Eugenics.Donovan Miyasaki - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Ethical debates about liberal eugenics frequently focus on the supposed unnaturalness of its means and possible harm to autonomy. I present a Nietzsche-inspired critique focusing on intention rather than means and harm to abilities rather than to autonomy. I first critique subjective eugenics, the selection of extrinsically valuable traits, drawing on Nietzsche’s notion of ‘slavish’ values reducible to the negation of another’s good. Subjective eugenics slavishly evaluates traits relative to a negatively evaluated norm (eg, above-average intelligence), disguising a harmful intention (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Medical Ethics Course for Residents: A Preliminary Study.Sukran Sevimli - 2021 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics Contents 7 (31):378-384.
    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine the importance of supplementary medical ethics course for resident physicians. In this study, we assessed the current state of their knowledge of medical ethics and aimed to improve and deepen their understanding of clinical scenarios to increase their awareness of the link between the practice of medicine and ethical issues. Methods: The course was held for groups of 10-12 people for 3 days a week for a total of 6 hours. Tests (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioural Economics for Medical Ethics. Jennifer S. Blumenthal-Barby MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 2021. 251 Pp. ISBN 978-0-262-54248-7. US $45.00 (Soft Cover). [REVIEW]Kathryn MacKay - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Assembling Bodies‐Without‐Organs : A Poststructuralist Analysis of Group Sex Between Men.Dave Holmes, Chad Hammond, Lauren Orser & Huy Nguyen - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. A Radical Imagination for Nursing: Generative Insurrection, Creative Resistance.Jessica Dillard-Wright - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Rethinking Dementia as a Queer Way of Life and as ‘Crip Possibility’: A Critique of the Concept of Person in Person‐Centredness.Thomas Foth & Annette Leibing - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Assemblages of Excess and Pleasures: The Sociosexual Uses of Online and Chemical Technologies Among Men Who Have Sex with Men.Matthew Numer, Dave Holmes, Chad Hammond, Phillip Joy & Jad Sinno - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Radical Responsibility Beyond Empathy: Interreligious Resources Against Liberal Distortions of Nursing Care.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Helpful Factors in a Healthcare Professional Intervention for Low‐Back Pain: Unveiled by Heidegger's Philosophy.Sanne Angel - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Conscientious Objections, the Nature of Medicine, and the Need for Reformability.Eric J. Kim & Kyle Ferguson - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (1):63-70.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 63-70, January 2022.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Alasdair MacIntyre’s Writings on Medicine and Medical Ethics.Patricia Souza Valle Cardoso Pastura & Marcelo Gerardin Poirot Land - 2019 - Revista Bioética 27 (4).
    Alasdair MacIntyre is a contemporary philosopher of Ethics and Politics best known for his book “After virtue”, 1981. The originality and relevance of this work lie in the presentation of his articles from the 1970’s about medicine and medical ethics, which are unexplored in Bioethics. In these articles, MacIntyre criticizes changes in society transforming the physician-patient relationship: fragmentary moral views, individualism, misunderstanding of scientism and fallibility of the practice, as well as the lost background of common values and medical authority. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. And If It Takes Lying: The Ethics of Blood Donor Non-Compliance.Kurt Blankschaen - 2021 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 31 (4):373-404.
  16. Attitudes on Euthanasia Among Medical Students and Doctors in Sri Lanka: A Cross Sectional Study.H. M. M. T. B. Herath, K. W. S. M. Wijayawardhana, U. I. Wickramarachchi & Chaturaka Rodrigo - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    Background Euthanasia is a topic of intense ethical debate and it is illegal in most countries at present, including Sri Lanka. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study of medical students and practicing doctors was to explore the acceptance of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide, and factors influencing this opinion. Methods A customised online questionnaire which explored opinions on euthanasia was administered to first and final year medical undergraduates in University of Colombo and practicing doctors with more than 5 years (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Theory Without Theories: Well-Being, Ethics, and Medicine.Jennifer Hawkins - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (6):656-683.
    Medical ethics would be better if people were taught to think more clearly about well-being or the concept of what is good for a person. Yet for a variety of reasons, bioethicists have generally paid little attention to this concept. Here, I argue, first, that focusing on general theories of welfare is not useful for practical medical ethics. I argue, second, for what I call the “theory-without-theories approach” to welfare in practical contexts. The first element of this approach is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Persuasive Discourses in Editorials Published by the Top‐Five Nursing Journals: Findings From a 5‐Year Analysis.Giovanna Iob, Chiara Visintini & Alvisa Palese - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Making Things Work: Using Bourdieu's Theory of Practice to Uncover an Ontology of Everyday Nursing in Practice.Sarah Lake, Sandra West & Trudy Rudge - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. A Short History of British Medical Ethics.Toni Saad - 2021 - The New Bioethics 27 (4):365-368.
    This brief and remarkably inexpensive book by the distinguished Professor Maehle of Durham University is composed of five detailed studies of aspects of nineteenth and twentieth century British med...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Theravada Buddhism and Roman Catholicism on the Moral Permissibility of Palliative Sedation: A Blurred Demarcation Line.Asmat Ara Islam - 2021 - Journal of Religion and Health 61:1-13.
    Although Theravada Buddhism and Roman Catholicism agree on the moral justification for palliative sedation, they differ on the premises underlying the justification. While Catholicism justifies palliative sedation on the ground of the Principle of Double Effect, Buddhism does so on the basis of the Third Noble Truth. Despite their theological differences, Buddhism and Catholicism both value the moral significance of the physician’s intent to reduce suffering and both respect the sanctity of life. This blurs the demarcation line between Buddhism and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Priority, Ethical Principle, and Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources. Di Wu - 2021 - Studies in Dialectics of Nature 11 (37):62-68.
    Aiming at the allocation of scarce medical resources, Immanuel and other scholars have put forward a set of influential ethical values and guiding principles. It assigns the priority of resource allocation to those whose lives can be saved and maximized, those who can bring the greatest instrumental value, and those who are the worse off. For other members of society, random selection under the same conditions is adopted. Following the Rawlsian "lexical order, lexicographical" rule, this priority arrangement requires that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Medicine’s Metaphysical Morass: How Confusion About Dualism Threatens Public Health.Diane O’Leary - 2020 - Synthese 2020 (December):1977-2005.
    What position on dualism does medicine require? Our understanding of that ques- tion has been dictated by holism, as defined by the biopsychosocial model, since the late twentieth century. Unfortunately, holism was characterized at the start with con- fused definitions of ‘dualism’ and ‘reductionism’, and that problem has led to a deep, unrecognized conceptual split in the medical professions. Some insist that holism is a nonreductionist approach that aligns with some form of dualism, while others insist it’s a reductionist view (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. When is It Considered Reasonable to Start a Risky and Uncomfortable Treatment in Critically Ill Patients? A Random Sample Online Questionnaire Study.M. Zink, A. Horvath & V. Stadlbauer - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-13.
    Background Health care professionals have to judge the appropriateness of treatment in critical care on a daily basis. There is general consensus that critical care interventions should not be performed when they are inappropriate. It is not yet clear which chances of survival are considered necessary or which risk for serious disabilities is acceptable in quantitative terms for different stakeholders to start intensive care treatment. Methods We performed an anonymous online survey in a random sample of 1,052 participants recruited via (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Impact of Reporting Magnetic Resonance Imaging Incidental Findings in the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds Cohort.Judy M. Luu, Anand K. Sergeant, Sonia S. Anand, Dipika Desai, Karleen Schulze, Bartha M. Knoppers, Ma’N. H. Zawati, Eric E. Smith, Alan R. Moody, Sandra E. Black, Eric Larose, Francois Marcotte, Erika Kleiderman, Jean-Claude Tardif, Douglas S. Lee, Matthias G. Friedrich & the Cahhm Study Investigators - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    Background In the Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds cohort, participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, heart, and abdomen, that generated incidental findings. The approach to managing these unexpected results remain a complex issue. Our objectives were to describe the CAHHM policy for the management of IFs, to understand the impact of disclosing IFs to healthy research participants, and to reflect on the ethical obligations of researchers in future MRI studies. Methods Between 2013 and 2019, 8252 participants (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Military Engagement in Civilian Healthcare; an Ethical Perspective.Peter Olsthoorn, Myriame Bollen, Sebastiaan Rietjens & Masood Khalil - 2012 - In Robert Beeres, Jan van der Meulen, Joseph Soeters & Ad Vogelaar (eds.), Mission Uruzgan. Collaborating in Multiple Coalitions for Afghanistan. Amsterdam, Nederland: pp. 251-264.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Breaking Down Communication: Narrative Medicine and its Distinctions.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Social Philosophy Today 37:197-205.
    In “Communication Breakdown: Probing the Limits of Narrative Medicine and its Discontents”, David J. Leichter engages practical experience teaching medical ethics in the college classroom to explore opportunities—and limits—of narrative engagement within medical ethics and clinical practice. Leichter raises concerns regarding potential epistemic harms, both testimonial and hermeneutical, when individuals, or their pain, cannot be adequately recognized through expressive modes traditionally understood as “narrative.” While I largely agree with Leichter’s worries about narrative authority and limits, I challenge his characterization of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Professional Medical Ethics: Grounds for Its Separateness and Position in Ethical Education of Physicians and Medical Students.Kazimierz Szewczyk - 2021 - Diametros 18 (69):33-70.
    In the article I prove the separateness of professional medical ethics in three ways: 1. By showing differences between the normative rank of responsibilities within general and professional ethics. 2. By justifying affiliation of professional medical ethics within the appropriation model which is a type of applied ethics characterized by its unique properties. 3. By justifying historical professionalism as the ethics that is proper for the medical profession; for this kind of ethical internalism the content of professional ethics is the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Radical Responsibility Beyond Empathy: Interreligious Resources Against Liberal Distortions of Nursing Care.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2021 - Nursing Philosophy 1 (1 Online first).
    In this paper, I bring together Jewish and Buddhist philosophical resources to develop a notion of radical responsibility that can confront a complicity within nursing and health care between empathy and (neo)liberal white supremacist hegemony. My inspiration comes from Angela Davis's call for building coalitions to advance struggles for peace and justice. I proceed as follows. First, I note ways phenomenology clarifies empathy's seeming foundational role in nursing care, and how such a formulation can be complicit with assumptions about private (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Futility: A Perennial Issue for Medical Ethics.John McMillan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (10):649-649.
    While the era following the Bland decision in 19931 might be thought of as the time when concepts such as ‘futility’ were placed under pressure and scrutiny, it’s an idea that has been debated for at least forty years. In a 1983 JME commentary Bryan Jennett distinguishes three kinds of reason why Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation might be withheld: > ‘… that CPR would be futile because it is very unlikely to be successful; that quality of life after CPR is likely to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Donchin and Holmes Emerging Scholar Prize Paper Understanding and Correcting Sex Disparity in Cardiovascular Disease Research: Ethical and Practical Solutions.Lida Sarafraz - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (2):81-96.
    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death of women in the United States, yet cardiovascular research is disproportionately conducted using male human subjects and male animal models. This article deploys Katrina Hutchison’s (2019) analysis of gender disparity in clinical trials as a moral aggregation problem to address the problem of underrepresentation of women in cardiovascular research. I identify cost concerns, convenience, pregnancy, and negligence as potential reasons for the underrepresentation of women in CVD research. Finally, I suggest that multilevel (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Virtual Learning for Teaching Medical Ethics During COVID-19 Pandemic.Mina Mobasher - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine 13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Caesarian in the Framework of Medical Ethics.Harun Kırılmaz & Ebrar Ulusinan - 2021 - Türkiye Biyoetik Dergisi 8 (2):114-125.
    One of the most important health developments is the caesarean section, which saves lives when mother and newborn are at risk. But while it has no benefit when used outside the need, it also carries a variety of risks, such as each surgery. Caesarean section presents risks such as complications caused by exposure to anesthesia in the mother, increased bleeding after delivery, prolongation of discharge, and delayed recovery. In addition to these, it also creates an economic burden. Reasons such as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Health Care in Contexts of Risk, Uncertainty, and Hybridity.Daniel Messelken & David Winkler (eds.) - 2021 - Springer.
    This book sheds light on various ethical challenges military and humanitarian health care personnel face while working in adverse conditions. Contexts of armed conflict, hybrid wars or other forms of violence short of war, as well as natural disasters, all have in common that ordinary circumstances can no longer be taken for granted. Hence, the provision of health care has to adapt, for example, to a different level of risk, to scarce resources, or uncommon approaches due to external incentives or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Authority and Epistemology in Islamic Medical Ethics of Women’s Reproductive Health.Zahra Ayubi - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (2):245-269.
    Journal of Religious Ethics, Volume 49, Issue 2, Page 245-269, June 2021.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Meaning and Medicine: An Underexplored Bioethical Value.Thaddeus Metz - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 33 (4):439-453.
    In this article, part of a special issue on meaning in life and medical ethics, I argue that several issues encountered in a bioethical context are not adequately addressed only with values such as morality and welfare. I maintain, more specifically, that the value of what makes a life meaningful is essential to being able to provide conclusive judgements about which decisions to make. After briefly indicating how meaningfulness differs from rightness and happiness, I point out how it is plausibly (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Reproductive Genome Editing Interventions Are Therapeutic, Sometimes.César Palacios-González - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (6):557-562.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Inconsistency Arguments Still Do Not Matter.Bruce P. Blackshaw, Nicholas Colgrove & Daniel Rodger - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 1:1-4.
    William Simkulet has recently criticised Colgrove et al’s defence against what they have called inconsistency arguments—arguments that claim opponents of abortion (OAs) act in ways inconsistent with their underlying beliefs about human fetuses (eg, that human fetuses are persons at conception). Colgrove et al presented three objections to inconsistency arguments, which Simkulet argues are unconvincing. Further, he maintains that OAs who hold that the fetus is a person at conception fail to act on important issues such as the plight of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. College Vaccination Mandates Do Not Violate Medical Ethics.Nathan Nobis - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Blog.
    As a medical ethicist, I want to explain why college vaccination requirements decidedly do not violate the core principles of medical ethics which include avoiding or lessening harms, promoting benefits, respecting people and their informed and free choices, and promoting justice and fairness. In particular, vaccine requirements do not violate the respect-related requirement to not selfishly “use” and abuse others as “means” for someone else’s benefit. Since false claims on important issues often have dire consequences, it’s important to explain why (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Medical Ethics and Socio-Political Change.Victor W. Sidel - 1972 - Hastings Center Report 2 (4):8.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Documentation of Ethically Relevant Information in Out-of-Hospital Resuscitation is Rare: A Danish Nationwide Observational Study of 16,495 Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests. [REVIEW]Louise Milling, Lars Grassmé Binderup, Caroline Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Erika Frischknecht Christensen, Annmarie Lassen, Helle Collatz Christensen, Dorthe Susanne Nielsen, Søren Mikkelsen & The Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry Group - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-10.
    Background Decision-making in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should ideally include clinical and ethical factors. Little is known about the extent of ethical considerations and their influence on prehospital resuscitation. We aimed to determine the transparency in medical records regarding decision-making in prehospital resuscitation with a specific focus on ethically relevant information and consideration in resuscitation providers’ documentation. Methods This was a Danish nationwide retrospective observational study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests from 2016 through 2018. After an initial screening using broadly defined inclusion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Introduction: Understanding Hunger.Andrea Borghini & Davide Serpico - 2021 - Topoi 40 (3):503-506.
  43. Consultation with Doctor Twitter: Consent Fatigue, and the Role of Developers in Digital Medical Ethics.Robert Ranisch - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):24-25.
    Laacke et al. investigate the ethical implications of possible artificial intelligence systems that automatically detect signs of depression by analyzing data from social media. The art...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Does Teaching Medical Ethics Ensure Good Knowledge, Attitude, and Reported Practice? An Ethical Vignette-Based Cross-Sectional Survey Among Doctors in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Nepal.Suchita Joshi, Sajan Acharya, Shuvechchha Karki, Jasmin Joshi, Ashma Shrestha & Carmina Shrestha - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-16.
    BackgroundImportance of awareness of medical ethics and its integration into medical curriculum has been frequently highlighted. Study 1 aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and reported practices of medical ethics among clinicians at Patan Academy of Health Sciences, a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. Study 2 was conducted to assess whether there was a difference in knowledge, attitude, and reported practices of medical ethics among doctors who received formal medical ethics education during undergraduate studies and those who did not.MethodsTwo (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Two Dilemmas for Medical Ethics in the Treatment of Gender Dysphoria in Youth.Teresa Baron & Geoffrey Dierckxsens - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107260.
    Both the diagnosis and medical treatment of gender dysphoria —particularly in children and adolescents—have been the subject of significant controversy in recent years. In this paper, we outline the means by which GD is diagnosed in children and adolescents, the currently available treatment options, and the bioethical issues these currently raise. In particular, we argue that the families and healthcare providers of children presenting with GD currently face two main ethical dilemmas in decision making regarding treatment: the pathway dilemma and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The Theorisation of ‘Best Interests’ in Bioethical Accounts of Decision-Making.Giles Birchley - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-18.
    Background Best interests is a ubiquitous principle in medical policy and practice, informing the treatment of both children and adults. Yet theory underlying the concept of best interests is unclear and rarely articulated. This paper examines bioethical literature for theoretical accounts of best interests to gain a better sense of the meanings and underlying philosophy that structure understandings. Methods A scoping review of was undertaken. Following a literature search, 57 sources were selected and analysed using the thematic method. Results Three (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Changing the Channel on Medical Ethics Education: Systematic Review and Qualitative Analysis of Didactic-Icebreakers in Medical Ethics and Professionalism Teaching. [REVIEW]Abdul-Hadi Kaakour, Raafay H. Syed, Dalia Kaakour & Abbas Rattani - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):125-140.
    As medical ethics and professionalism education continues to equip medical students and residents with long-lasting tools, educators should continue to supplement proven teaching strategies with engaging, relatable, and generationally appropriate didactic supplements. However, popular teaching aids have recently been criticized in the literature and summative information on alternatives is absent. The purpose of this review is to evaluate and assess the functional use and application of short form audiovisual didactic supplements or "icebreakers" in medical ethics and professionalism teaching. A systematic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Waiting, Strange: Transplant Recipient Experience, Medical Time and Queer/Crip Temporalities.Sara Wasson - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012141.
    People who receive a ‘solid’ organ transplant from a deceased person may experience imaginative challenges in making sense of how the transfer impacts their own past and future, as shown in existing scholarship. Building on such work, this article considers how the temporalities of medical encounter itself may also become temporally ambiguous, posing representational challenges both pre-transplantation and post-transplantation. The dominant narrative of transplant in transplantation journals and hospital communications, both clinical and patient-facing, presents surgery as a healing moment, yet (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Justified Asymmetries: Positive and Negative Claims to Conscience in Reproductive Health Care.Carolyn McLeod - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):60-62.
    A peer commentary on an AJOB article by Kyle Fritz called "Unjustified Asymmetry: Positive Claims of Conscience and Heartbeat Bills.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Talking It Better: Conversations and Normative Complexity in Healthcare Improvement.Alan Cribb, Vikki Entwistle & Polly Mitchell - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2020-012129.
    In this paper, we consider the role of conversations in contributing to healthcare quality improvement. More specifically, we suggest that conversations can be important in responding to what we call ‘normative complexity’. As well as reflecting on the value of conversations, the aim is to introduce the dimension of normative complexity as something that requires theoretical and practical attention alongside the more recognised challenges of complex systems, which we label, for short, as ‘explanatory complexity’. In brief, normative complexity relates to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 19470