Results for 'Jessica Chan'

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  1.  4
    Student Teachers’ Metaphorical Conceptualisations of the Experience of Watching Themselves and Their Peers on Video.Jessica Shuk Ching Leung, Kennedy Kam Ho Chan & Tracy Cuiling He - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Studies:1-18.
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  2.  19
    Holistic Representations of Internal and External Face Features Are Used to Support Recognition.Jessica P. K. Chan & Jennifer D. Ryan - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  3.  25
    Can Changes in Eye Movement Scanning Alter the Age-Related Deficit in Recognition Memory?Jessica P. K. Chan, Daphne Kamino, Malcolm A. Binns & Jennifer D. Ryan - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  4.  19
    Association with Emotional Information Alters Subsequent Processing of Neutral Faces.Lily Riggs, Takako Fujioka, Jessica Chan, Douglas A. McQuiggan, Adam K. Anderson & Jennifer D. Ryan - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  5.  8
    Public Involvement in the Governance of Population-Level Biomedical Research: Unresolved Questions and Future Directions.Sonja Erikainen, Phoebe Friesen, Leah Rand, Karin Jongsma, Michael Dunn, Annie Sorbie, Matthew McCoy, Jessica Bell, Michael Burgess, Haidan Chen, Vicky Chico, Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Julie Darbyshire, Rebecca Dawson, Andrew Evans, Nick Fahy, Teresa Finlay, Lucy Frith, Aaron Goldenberg, Lisa Hinton, Nils Hoppe, Nigel Hughes, Barbara Koenig, Sapfo Lignou, Michelle McGowan, Michael Parker, Barbara Prainsack, Mahsa Shabani, Ciara Staunton, Rachel Thompson, Kinga Varnai, Effy Vayena, Oli Williams, Max Williamson, Sarah Chan & Mark Sheehan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (7):522-525.
    Population-level biomedical research offers new opportunities to improve population health, but also raises new challenges to traditional systems of research governance and ethical oversight. Partly in response to these challenges, various models of public involvement in research are being introduced. Yet, the ways in which public involvement should meet governance challenges are not well understood. We conducted a qualitative study with 36 experts and stakeholders using the World Café method to identify key governance challenges and explore how public involvement can (...)
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  6. Governing AI-Driven Health Research: Are IRBs Up to the Task?Phoebe Friesen, Rachel Douglas-Jones, Mason Marks, Robin Pierce, Katherine Fletcher, Abhishek Mishra, Jessica Lorimer, Carissa Véliz, Nina Hallowell, Mackenzie Graham, Mei Sum Chan, Huw Davies & Taj Sallamuddin - 2021 - Ethics and Human Research 2 (43):35-42.
    Many are calling for concrete mechanisms of oversight for health research involving artificial intelligence (AI). In response, institutional review boards (IRBs) are being turned to as a familiar model of governance. Here, we examine the IRB model as a form of ethics oversight for health research that uses AI. We consider the model's origins, analyze the challenges IRBs are facing in the contexts of both industry and academia, and offer concrete recommendations for how these committees might be adapted in order (...)
     
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  7.  43
    Critical Periods After Stroke Study: Translating Animal Stroke Recovery Experiments Into a Clinical Trial.Alexander W. Dromerick, Matthew A. Edwardson, Dorothy F. Edwards, Margot L. Giannetti, Jessica Barth, Kathaleen P. Brady, Evan Chan, Ming T. Tan, Irfan Tamboli, Ruth Chia, Michael Orquiza, Robert M. Padilla, Amrita K. Cheema, Mark E. Mapstone, Massimo S. Fiandaca, Howard J. Federoff & Elissa L. Newport - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  8. What is Visual Culture? Jessica Evans and Stuart Hall.Jessica Evans - 1999 - In Jessica Evans & Stuart Hall (eds.), Visual Culture: The Reader. Sage Publications in Association with the Open University. pp. 1.
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  9. Mranʻ Māʹ Yutti Paññā ʼa Yū Toʻ Maṅgālā / Chaṅʻ ̋lvaṅʻ.Chaṅʻ ̋Lvaṅʻ - 2004 - [Phranʻʹ Khyi Re]̋, ʼĀ ̋mānʻ Sacʻ Cā Pe.
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  10.  29
    The Place of Ethics in the Christian Tradition and the Confucian Tradition: A Methodological Prolegomenon: YOUNG-CHAN RO.Young-Chan Ro - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (1):51-62.
    Comparative study of religions and philosophies, in spite of its significance and urgency, has been neither fully appreciated nor developed in the study of religion or philosophy. Comparative study, historically speaking, is still young and complex in its approach. Religious Studies as an intellectual discipline has traditionally concentrated on the investigation of a single tradition, enabling a student to become an ‘expert’ in that particular tradition. The world in which we live, however, no longer allows us to be content with (...)
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  11.  48
    Chan Jo-Shui's Influence on Wang Yang-Ming.Wing-tsit Chan - 1973 - Philosophy East and West 23 (1/2):9-30.
  12.  61
    Courtney S. Cox and Jessica C. Campbell Reply.Courtney S. Campbell & Jessica C. Cox - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report 41 (4):8-9.
  13.  11
    Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad in Conversation with Bruce Janz, Jessica Locke, and Cynthia Willett.Bruce B. Janz, Jessica Locke, Cynthia Willett & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):124-153.
    Bruce Janz, Jessica Locke, and Cynthia Willett interact in this exchange with different aspects of Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad’s book Human Being, Bodily Being. Through “constructive inter-cultural thinking”, they seek to engage with Ram-Prasad’s “lower-case p” phenomenology, which exemplifies “how to think otherwise about the nature and role of bodiliness in human experience”. This exchange, which includes Ram-Prasad’s reply to their interventions, pushes the reader to reflect more about different aspects of bodiliness.
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  14. Bald-Faced Lies: How to Make a Move in a Language Game Without Making a Move in a Conversation.Jessica Keiser - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):461-477.
    According to the naïve, pre-theoretic conception, lying seems to be characterized by the intent to deceive. However, certain kinds of bald-faced lies appear to be counterexamples to this view, and many philosophers have abandoned it as a result. I argue that this criticism of the naïve view is misplaced; bald-faced lies are not genuine instances of lying because they are not genuine instances of assertion. I present an additional consideration in favor of the naïve view, which is that abandoning it (...)
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  15.  9
    Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate.Jessica Flanigan - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    Jessica Flanigan defends patients' rights of self-medication on the grounds that same moral reasons against medical paternalism in clinical contexts are also reasons against paternalistic pharmaceutical policies, including prohibitive approval processes and prescription requirements.
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  16. From What to How: An Initial Review of Publicly Available AI Ethics Tools, Methods and Research to Translate Principles Into Practices.Jessica Morley, Luciano Floridi, Libby Kinsey & Anat Elhalal - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2141-2168.
    The debate about the ethical implications of Artificial Intelligence dates from the 1960s :741–742, 1960; Wiener in Cybernetics: or control and communication in the animal and the machine, MIT Press, New York, 1961). However, in recent years symbolic AI has been complemented and sometimes replaced by Neural Networks and Machine Learning techniques. This has vastly increased its potential utility and impact on society, with the consequence that the ethical debate has gone mainstream. Such a debate has primarily focused on principles—the (...)
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  17.  51
    The Thought of Mou Zongsan. By N. Serina Chan.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):208-211.
  18.  4
    Chan Insights and Oversights an Epistemological Critique of the Chan Tradition.Bernard Faure - 1993
    For many people attracted to Eastern religions (particularly Zen Buddhism), Asia seems the source of all wisdom. As Bernard Faure examines the study of Chan/Zen from the standpoint of postmodern human sciences and literary criticism, he challenges this inversion of traditional "Orientalist" discourse: whether the Other is caricatured or idealized, ethnocentric premises marginalize important parts of Chan thought. Questioning the assumptions of "Easterners" as well, including those of the charismatic D. T. Suzuki, Faure demonstrates how both West and (...)
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  19. Ethical Guidelines for COVID-19 Tracing Apps.Jessica Morley, Josh Cowls, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Nature 582:29–⁠31.
    Technologies to rapidly alert people when they have been in contact with someone carrying the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are part of a strategy to bring the pandemic under control. Currently, at least 47 contact-tracing apps are available globally. They are already in use in Australia, South Korea and Singapore, for instance. And many other governments are testing or considering them. Here we set out 16 questions to assess whether — and to what extent — a contact-tracing app is ethically justifiable.
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  20. What is Epistemic Blame?Jessica Brown - 2020 - Noûs 54 (2):389-407.
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  21.  51
    Nurses' Moral Sensitivity and Hospital Ethical Climate: A Literature Review.Jessica Schluter, Sarah Winch, Kerri Holzhauser & Amanda Henderson - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (3):304-321.
    Increased technological and pharmacological interventions in patient care when patient outcomes are uncertain have been linked to the escalation in moral and ethical dilemmas experienced by health care providers in acute care settings. Health care research has shown that facilities that are able to attract and retain nursing staff in a competitive environment and provide high quality care have the capacity for nurses to process and resolve moral and ethical dilemmas. This article reports on the findings of a systematic review (...)
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  22.  64
    On Meaning Without Use.Jessica Keiser - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy 118 (1):5-27.
    This paper defends the use-based metasemantic project against the problem of meaning without use, which allegedly shows the predictions of use-based metasemantic accounts to be indeterminate with respect to unusably long or complex expressions. This criticism is commonly taken to be decisive, prompting various retreats and contributing to the project’s eventual decline. Using metasemantic conventionalism as a case study, I argue the following: either such expressions do not belong to used languages or their meanings are uniquely determined by use. Thus, (...)
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  23.  7
    2. A Matter of Taste: Qi and the Tending of the Heart in Mencius 2A2 ALAN K. L. CHAN.Alan K. L. Chan - 2017 - In Mencius: Contexts and Interpretations. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 42-71.
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  24.  4
    The Thought of Mou Zongsan. By N. Serina Chan.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):209-212.
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  25. The Birth of Belief.Jessica Moss & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (1):1-32.
    did plato and aristotle have anything to say about belief? The answer to this question might seem blindingly obvious: of course they did. Plato distinguishes belief from knowledge in the Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus, and Aristotle does so in the Posterior Analytics. Plato distinguishes belief from perception in the Theaetetus, and Aristotle does so in the De anima. They talk about the distinction between true and false beliefs, and the ways in which belief can mislead and the ways in which (...)
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  26. Four Meta-Methods for the Study of Qualia.Lok-Chi Chan & Andrew J. Latham - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (1):145-167.
    In this paper, we describe four broad ‘meta-methods’ employed in scientific and philosophical research of qualia. These are the theory-centred metamethod, the property-centred meta-method, the argument-centred meta-method, and the event-centred meta-method. Broadly speaking, the theory-centred meta-method is interested in the role of qualia as some theoretical entities picked out by our folk psychological theories; the property-centred meta-method is interested in some metaphysical properties of qualia that we immediately observe through introspection ; the argument-centred meta-method is interested in the role of (...)
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  27.  73
    Aristotle on the Apparent Good: Perception, Phantasia, Thought, and Desire.Jessica Moss - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Pt. I. The apparent good. Evaluative cognition -- Perceiving the good -- Phantasia and the apparent good -- pt. II. The apparent good and non-rational motivation. Passions and the apparent good -- Akrasia and the apparent good -- pt. III. The apparent good and rational motivation. Phantasia and deliberation -- Happiness, virtue, and the apparent good -- Practical induction -- Conclusion : Aristotle's practical empiricism.
  28.  21
    Action Experience Alters 3-Month-Old Infants' Perception of Others' Actions.Jessica A. Sommerville, Amanda L. Woodward & Amy Needham - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):B1-B11.
  29. Subject‐Sensitive Invariantism and the Knowledge Norm for Practical Reasoning.Jessica Brown - 2008 - Noûs 42 (2):167-189.
  30. Anti-Individualism and Knowledge.Jessica Brown - 2004 - MIT Press.
  31. What’s New About Fake News?Jessica Pepp, Eliot Michaelson & Rachel Sterken - 2019 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 16 (2).
    The term "fake news" ascended rapidly to prominence in 2016 and has become a fixture in academic and public discussions, as well as in political mud-slinging. In the flurry of discussion, the term has been applied so broadly as to threaten to render it meaningless. In an effort to rescue our ability to discuss—and combat—the underlying phenomenon that triggered the present use of the term, some philosophers have tried to characterize it more precisely. A common theme in this nascent philosophical (...)
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  32. Assertion: New Philosophical Essays.Jessica Brown & Herman Cappelen (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Assertion is a fundamental feature of language. This volume will be the place to look for anyone interested in current work on the topic.
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  33.  52
    Why Does Kant Think We Must Believe in the Immortal Soul?Jessica Tizzard - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (1):114-129.
    Making sense of Kant’s claim that it is morally necessary for us to believe in the immortal soul is a historically fraught issue. Commentators typically reject it, or take one of two paths: they either restrict belief in the immortal soul to our subjective psychology, draining it of any substantive rational grounding; or make it out to be a rational necessity that morally interested beings must accept on pain of contradiction. Against these interpreters, I argue that on Kant’s view, belief (...)
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  34. Fair Machine Learning Under Partial Compliance.Jessica Dai, Sina Fazelpour & Zachary Lipton - 2021 - In Proceedings of the 2021 AAAI/ACM Conference on AI, Ethics, and Society. pp. 55–65.
    Typically, fair machine learning research focuses on a single decision maker and assumes that the underlying population is stationary. However, many of the critical domains motivating this work are characterized by competitive marketplaces with many decision makers. Realistically, we might expect only a subset of them to adopt any non-compulsory fairness-conscious policy, a situation that political philosophers call partial compliance. This possibility raises important questions: how does partial compliance and the consequent strategic behavior of decision subjects affect the allocation outcomes? (...)
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  35. A Defense of Compulsory Vaccination.Jessica Flanigan - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (1):5-25.
    Vaccine refusal harms and risks harming innocent bystanders. People are not entitled to harm innocents or to impose deadly risks on others, so in these cases there is nothing to be said for the right to refuse vaccination. Compulsory vaccination is therefore justified because non-vaccination can rightly be prohibited, just as other kinds of harmful and risky conduct are rightly prohibited. I develop an analogy to random gunfire to illustrate this point. Vaccine refusal, I argue, is morally similar to firing (...)
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  36. From Essence to Necessity Via Identity.Jessica Leech - 2021 - Mind 130 (519):887-908.
    An essentialist theory of modality claims that the source of possibility and necessity lies in essence, where essence is then not to be defined in terms of necessity. Hence such theories owe us an account of why it is that the essences of things give rise to necessities in the way required. A new approach to understanding essence in terms of the notion of generalized identity promises to answer this challenge by appeal to the necessity of identity. I explore the (...)
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  37. Putting the Self Into Self-Conscious Emotions: A Theoretical Model.Jessica L. Tracy & Richard W. Robins - 2004 - Psychological Inquiry 15 (2):103-125.
  38.  89
    A Naturalist’s View of Pride.Jessica L. Tracy, Azim F. Shariff & Joey T. Cheng - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):163-177.
    Although pride has been central to philosophical and religious discussions of emotion for thousands of years, it has largely been neglected by psychologists. However, in the past decade a growing body of psychological research on pride has emerged; new theory and findings suggest that pride is a psychologically important and evolutionarily adaptive emotion. In this article we review this accumulated body of research and argue for a naturalist account of pride, which presumes that pride emerged by way of natural selection. (...)
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  39. Right Reason in Plato and Aristotle: On the Meaning of Logos.Jessica Moss - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (3):181-230.
    Something Aristotle calls ‘right logos’ plays a crucial role in his theory of virtue. But the meaning of ‘logos’ in this context is notoriously contested. I argue against the standard translation ‘reason’, and—drawing on parallels with Plato’s work, especially the Laws—in favor of its being used to denote what transforms an inferior epistemic state into a superior one: an explanatory account. Thus Aristotelian phronēsis, like his and Plato’s technē and epistēmē, is a matter of grasping explanatory accounts: in this case, (...)
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  40.  95
    Epistemically blameworthy belief.Jessica Brown - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (12):3595-3614.
    When subjects violate epistemic standards or norms, we sometimes judge them blameworthy rather than blameless. For instance, we might judge a subject blameworthy for dogmatically continuing to believe a claim even after receiving evidence which undermines it. Indeed, the idea that one may be blameworthy for belief is appealed to throughout the contemporary epistemic literature. In some cases, a subject seems blameworthy for believing as she does even though it seems prima facie implausible that she is morally blameworthy or professionally (...)
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  41. Contextualism and Warranted Assertibility Manoeuvres.Jessica Brown - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):407 - 435.
    Contextualists such as Cohen and DeRose claim that the truth conditions of knowledge attributions vary contextually, in particular that the strength of epistemic position required for one to be truly ascribed knowledge depends on features of the attributor's context. Contextualists support their view by appeal to our intuitions about when it's correct (or incorrect) to ascribe knowledge. Someone might argue that some of these intuitions merely reflect when it is conversationally appropriate to ascribe knowledge, not when knowledge is truly ascribed, (...)
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  42.  21
    Debating Sex Work.Jessica Flanigan & Lori Watson - 2019 - New York: Oup Usa.
    In this "for and against" book, ethicists Lori Watson and Jessica Flanigan debate the criminalization of sex work. Watson argues for a sex equality approach to prostitution in which buyers are criminalized and sellers are decriminalized, known as the Nordic Model. Flanigan argues that sex work should be fully decriminalized because decriminalization ensures respect for sex workers' and clients' rights, and is more effective than alternative policies.
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  43. Infant Sensitivity to Distributional Information Can Affect Phonetic Discrimination.Jessica Maye, Janet F. Werker & LouAnn Gerken - 2002 - Cognition 82 (3):B101-B111.
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  44. The Varieties of (Relative) Modality.Jessica Leech - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2).
    In ‘The Varieties of Necessity’ Fine presents purported counterexamples to the view that a proposition is a naturally necessary truth if and only if it is logically necessary relative to or conditional upon the basic truths about the status and distribution of natural kinds, properties and relations. The aim of this article is to defend the view that natural necessity is relative necessity, and the general idea that we can define other kinds of necessity as relative, against Fine's criticisms.
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  45. Hypocrisy and Moral Authority.Jessica Isserow & Colin Klein - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 12 (2):191-222.
    Hypocrites invite moral opprobrium, and charges of hypocrisy are a significant and widespread feature of our moral lives. Yet it remains unclear what hypocrites have in common, or what is distinctively bad about them. We propose that hypocrites are persons who have undermined their claim to moral authority. Since this self-undermining can occur in a number of ways, our account construes hypocrisy as multiply realizable. As we explain, a person’s moral authority refers to a kind of standing that they occupy (...)
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  46. Evolutionary Hypotheses and Moral Skepticism.Jessica Isserow - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (5):1025-1045.
    Proponents of evolutionary debunking arguments aim to show that certain genealogical explanations of our moral faculties, if true, undermine our claim to moral knowledge. Criticisms of these arguments generally take the debunker’s genealogical explanation for granted. The task of the anti-debunker is thought to be that of reconciling the truth of this hypothesis with moral knowledge. In this paper, I shift the critical focus instead to the debunker’s empirical hypothesis and argue that the skeptical strength of an evolutionary debunking argument (...)
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  47. Knowledge and Assertion.Jessica Brown - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):549-566.
  48. Kantian Moral Psychology and Human Weakness.Jessica Tizzard - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (16):1-28.
    Immanuel Kant’s notion of weakness or frailty warrants more attention, for it reveals much about his theory of motivation and general metaphysics of mind. As the first and least severe of the three grades of evil, frailty captures those cases where an agent fails to act on their avowed recognition that the moral law is the only legitimate determining ground of the will. The possibility of such cases raises many important questions that have yet to be settled by interpreters. Most (...)
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  49.  33
    Pulling Out the Intentional Structure of Action: The Relation Between Action Processing and Action Production in Infancy.Jessica A. Sommerville & Amanda L. Woodward - 2005 - Cognition 95 (1):1-30.
  50.  30
    An Evolutionary Approach to Understanding Distinct Emotions.Jessica L. Tracy - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):308-312.
    According to evolutionary accounts of distinct emotions, these emotions are shaped by natural selection to adjust the physiological, psychological, cognitive, and behavioral parameters of an organism to facilitate its capacity to respond adaptively to threats and opportunities present in the environment. This account has a number of implications, most notably: each distinct emotion serves, or served, an adaptive function, and emotions are comprised of multiple components, all of which should be functional. In this article, I briefly outline an evolutionary approach (...)
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