Chinese Philosophy

Edited by JeeLoo Liu (California State University, Fullerton)
About this topic
Summary Chinese philosophy is built on the metaphysical assumption that qi (traditionally translated as “material force” or “vital energy”) pervades the Universe and all things are composed of qi. This ontology leads to a conception of the world as an organic whole, in which everything is interconnected – from nature to the human world, from inorganic objects to sensible things. Chinese philosophers had a purely this-worldly concern; their goal was to improve on the world given. Originated in the primitive form of nature worship, ancient Chinese developed a sense of admiration and affection towards the natural world around them. This religious spirit prompted a philosophical pursuit of the order of the universe and the ontological foundation for all existence. Ancient Chinese thinkers had an intense desire to find the best way to make the right political decisions, to alleviate social problems, and to properly conduct themselves. Sociopolitical philosophy and ethics are thus the two core areas in Chinese philosophy. At the same time, since social structure, political polity and human conduct should all cohere with the cosmic order, Chinese philosophy is fundamentally rooted in its cosmology. This cosmology is manifested mostly in the philosophy of the Yijing. Chinese cosmology is built on the belief that there is a cosmic order or cosmic pattern, which serves not only as the source for all existence, but also as the governing rule for all cosmic developments. This pattern was commonly referred to as ‘Dao’ by ancient philosophers. The pursuit ofDao would become an ultimate goal shared by all Chinese philosophers. Under the holistic cosmic picture, the cosmic order also governs human affairs. Consequently, Dao takes on a normative connotation: it signifies the right way for human affairs and the normative principle for human conduct. In this sense, Daostands for the highest moral precept for human beings. There are three main branches in Chinese philosophy – Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism. Each school has its distinct answer to the quest of ultimate reality and the roles humans should play in this world. To educate others what constitutes virtue and to inspire others to act in accordance with Dao, was thus the self-assigned mission for most Chinese philosophers.
Key works The first systematic introduction to Chinese philosophy is the two-volume set Fung Yu-lan 1997, first published in the 1930s. This book is arguably the most influential introduction to the history of Chinese philosophy, even though some of Fung’s analyses are often contested by contemporary Chinese scholars. The two-volume set has been translated into English by Derk Bodde (Feng & Bodde 1937). A condensed and more accessible version of Fung’s History is also translated by Derk Bodde (Feng 1948). Among Chinese scholars, Lao 2005’s thee-volume (in four books) set is widely respected and frequently consulted. A more recent and analytic introduction to Chinese philosophy is Liu 2006. This book does not cover the history of Chinese philosophy beyond Chinese Buddhism, however. Mou 2008 has a more comprehensive coverage of all eras in the history of Chinese philosophy, but at the cost of sacrificing philosophical details. For readers who cannot read primary Chinese texts, Chan 1963 is a good source of representative selections of Chinese philosophical works.
Introductions

Chan 1963 provides a comprehensive coverage and fairly representative selections of all major philosophers or philosophical schools in Chinese history. The editor provides succinct introductions for each selection. It is a must-have sourcebook for scholars who can read only English, even though the old-fashioned Wade-Giles spelling of Chinese names in this book could create confusion for beginners.  

Feng & Bodde 1937 provides a comprehensive coverage of various schools in the history of Chinese philosophy. At times, the introduction is packed with quotes, with little analysis. It is nonetheless an authoritative introduction to this date.

Feng 1948 is not just an abridgment of Feng & Bodde 1937. Fung wrote this short history with the aim to give a complete picture of Chinese philosophical history in a nutshell. This book is far more accessible and interesting than Feng & Bodde 1937. Originally published in New York: Macmillan, 1948.

Lao Ssu-Kwang勞思光, Xinbian Zhongguo Zhexue Shi新編中國哲學史. 3 volumes. Guangxi, China: Guanxi shifandaxue chubanshe, 2005.

There is no English translation of this three-volume set. This is a revised version of Lao’s famed History of Chinese Philosophy (Zhongguo zhexue shi 中國哲學史), originally published in Hong Kong: Youlian chubanshe, 1968. Lao’s History provides detailed logical analysis of the philosophical problems and theories of all the schools covered in this book. It is widely referred to by Chinese scholars.

Liu 2006 provides an up-to-date introduction to Chinese philosophy in the analytic style. In its analysis of primary texts, it also reflects topics and discourses on Chinese philosophy in contemporary scholarship in English. The scope of this book covers classical philosophical schools and four major schools in Chinese Buddhism.

Related categories
Subcategories:

18842 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 18842
Material to categorize
  1. Nguyen, A. Minh, ed., New Essays in Japanese Aesthetics.Adam Loughnane - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-6.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Teaching Business Language and Strategy with the Tao Te Ching : A Commented Original Translation.Jean Langlois-Berthelot, Xiaoman Yang & Marc-Olivier Boisset - 2021 - ICC Journal 3 (2):15-24.
    Jean Langlois-Berthelot and Xiaoman Yang propose a new translation of several parts of Tao Te Ching. They wrote the commentary of the translation with Marc-Olivier Boisset.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Language, Culture and Philosophy : Comparing France and China.Jean Langlois-Berthelot & Xiaoman Yang - 2020 - ICC Journal-The International Language Association 2 (2):24-39.
    Xiaoman Yang and Jean Langlois-Berthelot explore the analysis by Chinese philosophers of Emmanuel Levinas, a 20th century French philosopher whose thinking had close links with the cultural philosophical principles of Confucius and Chan Buddhism. Their article is entitled "Language, Culture and Philosophy-Comparing France and China".
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Atomism, Communitarianism, and Confucian Familism.Andrew T. W. Hung - 2022 - Fudan Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences 15.
    Charles Taylor criticizes many liberal theories based on a kind of atomism that assumes the individual self-sufficiency outside the polity. This not only causes soft-relativism and political fragmentation but also undermines the solidarity of the community, that is, the very condition of the formation of autonomous citizens. Taylor thus argues for communitarian politics which protects certain cultural common goods for sustaining the solidarity of the community. However, Brenda Lyshaug criticizes Taylor’s communitarianism as suppressing plurality and enhancing hostility among cultural groups. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. On Reconstructions of Confucius as a Philosopher.Eske Møllgaard - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):661-666.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Balbo, Andrea, and Jaewon Ahn, eds., Confucius and Cicero: Old Ideas for a New World, New Ideas for an Old World: Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2019, 216 pages.Mark Kevin S. Cabural - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):695-698.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Huang, Yushun 黃玉順, Voice From the East: The Chinese Theory of Justice 中國正義論的重建——儒家制度倫理學的當代闡釋: Hefei 合肥: Anhui Renmin Chubanshe 安徽人民出版社, 2013, 330 pages.Huilan Zhu - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):699-704.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Ritual: The Root of Trust.Warren G. Frisina - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):667-673.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Pfister, Lauren, Vital Post-Secular Perspectives on Chinese Philosophical Issues: New York: Lexington Books, 2020, xii+350 pages.Manuel Rivera Espinoza - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):711-715.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Qing, Xitai 卿希泰, and Zhan Shichuang 詹石窗, eds., General History of Chinese Daoism 中國道教通史. 5 volumes: Beijing 北京: Renmin Chubanshe 人民出版社, 2019, 3585 pages.Lijuan Zhang - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):717-721.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Confucius and the “Rectification of Names”: Hu Shi and the Modern Discourse on Zhengming.Carine Defoort - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):613-633.
    The common approach to discussing Confucius’ advocacy of “correction of names” is to join the current academic debate about its meaning, usually in philosophical terms. Rather than joining in, however, this article describes the debate itself as a historically situated discourse largely dating from the early Republican era. I argue that Hu Shi 胡適 played a crucial but largely forgotten role in the creation of this discourse. While the core of the current discourse on zhengming consists of views that can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Zhao, Tingyang (translated by Joseph E. Harroff), All under Heaven: The Tianxia System for a Possible World Order: Oakland: University of California Press, 2021, 301 pages.Haimo Li - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):723-725.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Jia, Lianxiang 賈連翔, Collected Annotations of the Unearthed Numerical Hexagrams’ Texts 出土數字卦文獻輯釋: Shanghai 上海: Zhongxi Shuju 中西書局, 2020, 305 pages.Sutong Hao - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):705-709.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Two Levels of Emotion and Well-Being in the Zhuangzi.Sangmu Oh - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):589-611.
    Emotion is an essential component of human nature, and therefore it is necessary to explore the issue of a desirable emotional state if we want to properly discuss human well-being. This article examines the issue by advocating a new understanding of the Zhuangzi’s 莊子 ideas on emotion. In terms of the Zhuangzi’s ideas on the desirable emotional state, scholars have presented various interpretations to date, even arguing that the ideas themselves are mutually contradictory or inconsistent. This article shows that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Dressing as a Sage: Clothing and Self-cultivation in Early Confucian Thought.Naiyi Hsu - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):567-588.
    This article examines the reasons early Confucians offer to support the belief that clothing is formative of its wearer’s character, as well as the arguments other early Chinese texts raise to object to it. It focuses on early Confucian discourses about three representative items of clothing, including the cap used in the coming-of-age ceremony, the accessories made by jade, and a style of clothing named shenyi 深衣. These cases demonstrate that, in early Confucian thought, clothing is said to be able (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Trust and Recognition Reconsidered.Alexei Procyshyn & Mario Wenning - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):675-693.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Mohist Optics and Analogical Reasoning.Boqun Zhou - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (4):549-565.
    In Mohist philosophy, the gnomon is a metaphor for the standard of valid arguments. This metaphor comes from the method of establishing due east and west by observing gnomon shadows at dusk and dawn. I argue that there is also an overlooked, implicit aspect of the gnomon metaphor that comes from its function of measuring the height of heaven indirectly through proportional calculation. The function of indirect measurement inspires a strategy of argumentation in Mohist ethics, which I call “analogical upscaling.” (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Confucian Philosophy of Family: Interpretation or Justification?Yong Li - forthcoming - Asian Philosophy:1-12.
    During the past decade, Si Xiao, Xianglong Zhang, Xiangcheng Sun and others have proposed a Confucian Philosophy of Family movement as a response to issues in contemporary China. These issues...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Confucian Virtue Ethics and Ethical Leadership in Modern China.Li Yuan, Robert Chia & Jonathan Gosling - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Research on ethical leadership in organizations has been largely based on Western philosophical traditions and has tended to focus on Western corporate experiences. Insights gained from such studies may however not be universally applicable in other cultural contexts. This paper examines the normative grounds for an alternative Confucian virtue-based ethics of leadership in China. As with Western corporations, organizational practices in China are profoundly shaped by their own cultural history and philosophical outlook. The ethical norms guiding both the practice and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Shu-Considerateness and Ren-Humaneness: The Confucian Silver Rule and Golden Rule.Jinhua Jia - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Confucian Philosophy of Family: Interpretation or Justification?Yong Li - forthcoming - Tandf: Asian Philosophy:1-12.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Making Peace with the Barbarians: Neo-Confucianism and the Pro-Peace Argument in 17th-Century Korea.Sungmoon Kim - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory:147488512096396.
    This article investigates the Neo-Confucian discourse on war, premised on the “Chinese versus barbarian” binary, and its impact on the Neo-Confucian scholar-officials of 17th-century Chosŏn Korea....
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Contributors to Volume 6.Linda Veno Kam & James Daryl Sellmann - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (3):393-397.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Contributors to Volume 5.Linda Veno Kan, James Sellmann & Krirll Thompson - 1981 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 8 (2):267-270.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. If Confucius Met Scanlon—Understanding Filial Piety From Confucianism and Contractualism.William Sin - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (12):e12792.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. 「我也是」:作為集體行動的公共輿論運動.Yao Lin - 2019 - 思想 38:253-324.
    This article is the first in a two-paper series, which offers a comprehensive and systematic review of, and response to, various anti-MeToo arguments made by MeToo skeptics. Taking the U.S. and China as examples, the first section overviews the local contexts of anti-sexual-assault/harassment movements, and the respective issues and challenges they each confront. It then summarizes the three primary objectives of the MeToo movement (accountability, empowerment and reform) and the three ideal-typical critiques advanced by MeToo skeptics (the Mobs Critique, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Ernest Sosa Encountering Chinese Philosophy.Yong Huang - 2020 - Bloomsbury.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic.Yuan Ren - forthcoming - History and Philosophy of Logic:1-3.
    The Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic is the first general overview of Chinese logical philosophy in English, presumably providing students and researchers of Chinese thought in the Engl...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Utopia in the Revival of Confucian Education: An Ethnography of the Classics-Reading Movement in Contemporary China.Sandra Gilgan - 2022 - Brill.
    _Utopia in the Revival of Confucian Education_ investigates the classics-reading movement in contemporary Chinese society by examining how people re-forge lost bonds with tradition in the revival of Confucian education and strive towards their ideal future, while seeking to overcome the problems of the present.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Contemporary Business Practices of the Ru (Confucian) Ethic of “Three Guides and Five Constant Virtues (三綱五常)” in Asia and Beyond.Bin Song - 2021 - Religions 12 (895):1-24.
    What can remain unchanged while the Ru tradition (Confucianism) is continually passed down generationally and passed on geographically to non-Chinese Asian countries and beyond? Does the answer to this question hinted by the tradition itself, viz., the ethic of Three Guides and Five Constant Virtues, still work in contemporary society? As intrigued by these fundamental questions on Ruism, scholars have debated on the nature of the ethic and its adaptability to the contemporary world. One side of scholars condemned it as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Humanity: Existing Through “Affairs”.Yang Guorong - 2021 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 52 (3):166-192.
    As human activity in the broad sense, affairs unfold through the entirety of the processes of human being. They are also intrinsic to each aspect of human being. Through affairs, humans create heav...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. “Affairs” and the Actual World.Yang Guorong - 2021 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 52 (3):137-165.
    The actual world, which surpasses the original state of being, consists in “affairs”. Affairs can be understood as human activity and its outcomes. From the perspective of an abstract metaphy...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The Philosophy of Affairs.I. I. I. Robert A. Carleo & Liu Liangjian - 2021 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 52 (3):125-136.
    Yang Guorong is a contemporary philosopher with little need for introduction—and not only because he has been introduced here before.1 Professor Yang’s decades of prolific scholarship cover nearly...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Confucianismo y averroísmo: apuntes para un estudio comparado.Benjamín Antonio Figueroa Lackington - 2021 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 38 (3):453-467.
    This article explores some philosophical affinities between Confucianism and Averroism. It analyzes both intellectual traditions in their theoretical incompatibility with modern philosophical anthropology and, more specifically, with the Christian–Liberal notion of individual. Said incompatibility is examined on a historiographical level, a philosophical level, and a genealogical level. It concludes that both traditions offer conceptual and hermeneutical tools for thinking our present beyond modern philosophical categories.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Is Confucian Discourse Philosophy?Eske J. Møllgaard - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (4):1029-1045.
    Recently some philosophers have claimed that it is a scandal that non-Western traditions are excluded from the curriculum in Western philosophy departments. I consider the case of Confucianism and argue that the central features of Confucian discourse are different from those of philosophical discourse, that the historical conditions that gave rise to Confucian discourse sets it apart from the formation of Western philosophy, and that Western philosophers often misread Confucian discourse because they assimilate it to philosophical discourse. I conclude that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Confucian Atomistic Individual? Selfhood in Xiong Shili's New Treatise on the Uniqueness of Consciousness.Philippe Major - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (4):938-958.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. What Confucianism and for Whom? The Value and Dilemma of Invoking Confucianism in Confucian Political Theories.Yutang Jin - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-21.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Confucian and Marxian Ways: Ironic Affinities.Kevin M. Brien - 2021 - Dialogue and Universalism 31:39-66.
    This essay explores significant affinities with respect to the humanism of the Marxian and Confucian Ways. Although orthodox Marxism suppresses the humanistic dimensions of Marx’s thought, they are foremost in his earlier writing, and were never abandoned in his later thought. All varieties of Confucianism recognize its humanism. The essay argues that both perspectives involve process modes of understanding; that both have a convergent understanding of abstract general terms; that both view the human being as a community being; that both (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Intercultural Dialogues in Times of Global Pandemics: The Confucian Ethics of Relations and Social Organization in Sinic Societies.Jana S. Rošker - 2021 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 11 (3-4):206-216.
    Since COVID-19 is a global-scale pandemic, it can only be solved on the global level. In this context, intercultural dialogues are of utmost importance. Indeed, different models of traditional ethics might be of assistance in constructing a new, global ethics that could help us confront the present predicament and prepare for other possible global crises that might await us in the future. The explosive, pandemic spread of COVID-19 in 2020 clearly demonstrated that in general, one of the most effective tools (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. An Alternative to Individualism: Relational Concept of Human in Confucian Role Ethics.Vytis Silius - 2021 - Problemos 100.
    The article proposes to see Confucian role ethics as a philosophical project that puts forward metaethical and metaphilosophical arguments regarding the nature of ethics and the concept of human beings, instead of concentrating on its interpretational work in explicating the nature of early Confucian ethics. Thus, a more fitting context for evaluating the core claims of role ethics is suggested, one that is comprised of different positions, coming from a wide range of philosophical and cultural backgrounds, as well as different (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Phenomenology and Intercultural Questioning A Case of Chinese Philosophy.Sai Hang Kwok - 2021 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 13 (2):153-166.
    ABSTRACT Many recent works on the methodology of intercultural philosophy point to a fundamental dilemma of the discipline: if there is a common ground for intercultural understanding, then the essence of this ground is universal instead of multi-cultural; if there are irreducible and incommunicable factors in different cultures, then complete understanding seems to be impossible. In this paper, I propose that this dilemma is founded on the assumption that intercultural philosophy is equivalent to intercultural understanding. I argue that, however, intercultural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Response to Wang, Huang, and Frisina's Comments on the Good is One, its Manifestations Many.Robert Cummings Neville - 2020 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 47 (3-4):305-317.
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Volume 47, Issue 3-4, Page 305-317, September–December 2020.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Neville's the Good is One, its Manifestations Many: A Response.Warren G. Frisina - 2020 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 47 (3-4):295-304.
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Volume 47, Issue 3-4, Page 295-304, September–December 2020.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Gadamer and the Yijing's Language of Nature: Hermeneutics and Chinese Aesthetics.Andrew Fuyarchuk - 2020 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 47 (3-4):174-192.
    Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Volume 47, Issue 3-4, Page 174-192, September–December 2020.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The Confucian Concept of Human Dignity and its Implications for Bioethics.Yaming Li - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Confucianism and the Three Timeless Truths: A Study of the Concept of Order.Abhilash G. Nath - 2021 - Dissertation, MGU, Kottayam
    Confucianism, a way of life taught by Confucius in the 6th–5th century B.C.E., is considered along with Taoism and Chinese Buddhism as one of the three pillars of Chinese civilisation. It is, in fact, an outcome of 2500 years of the Chinese experience. Over time, elements adapted from Buddhism and Taoism have transformed Confucian practices from within to more like a religion than a way of life. Confucian teachings nevertheless have deeply touched all aspects of Chinese life, whether inter-personal relationships, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. On the Cusp of a New World Order? A Dialogue Between Confucianism and Dewey and Pragmatism.Roger T. Ames - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (1):11-25.
    At the end of 2013, China introduced what it calls the ‘One Belt, One Road Initiative’. From a Chinese perspective, this initiative is nothing less than a strategy...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Confucian Freedom: Assessing the Debate.I. I. I. Robert A. Carleo - 2021 - Asian Philosophy 31 (3):211-228.
    What place does freedom have in Confucianism? We find a wide spectrum of views on the matter: some deny that Confucians value or even conceive of freedom, while others celebrate uniquely exalted fo...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Ricordare Sempre: Istruzioni del Re del Dharma, la Gemma che Esaudisce i Desiderî.Gigme Phuntsok, Khenpo Sodargye & Martino Dibeltulo Concu (eds.) - 2020 - Naples, Metropolitan City of Naples, Italy: Diana Edizioni.
    Nei primi anni Ottanta a Sêrtar, nella provincia del Sichuan, una piccola assemblea di buddhisti si riuniva attorno a Sua Santità Gigme Phuntsok, un eminente lama tibetano fondatore dell’Accademia di Larung Gar. La piccola assemblea dei primi tempi è oggi un’immensa comunità di migliaia di monaci e laici provenienti dal Tibet e dalla Cina. A Sêrtar, a oltre 4.000 metri di altitudine, una distesa di dimore rosse ospitava nel 2017 fra i 10.000 e i 40.000 residenti. -/- Ricordare sempre, il (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Idea of Cyclicality in Chinese Thought.Yanming An - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (3):389-406.
    The Chinese view of time and history cannot be defined as either “cyclicality” or “linearity” in the sense of St. Augustine and Hegel. Like the Indo-Hellenic cyclicality, it regards the cyclical movements as universal in both Heaven and human. Nevertheless, it contains neither the conception of Great Year or Mahayuga, nor that of repeated destruction and reconstruction of humankind. It holds that the cyclical movements do not recur as “uniform rotation,” but appear as a chain composed of countless links each (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 18842