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  1. Leibniz’s Doctrine of Reincarnation as Metamorphosis.Nikolai Lossky & Frédéric Tremblay - 2020 - Sophia 59 (4):755-766.
    The Russian philosopher Nikolai Onufrievich Lossky considered himself a Leibnizian of sorts. He accepted parts of Leibniz’s doctrine of monads, although he preferred to call them ‘substantival agents’ and rejected the thesis that they have neither doors nor windows. In Lossky’s own doctrine, monads have existed since the beginning of time, they are immortal, and can evolve or devolve depending on the goodness or badness of their behavior. Such evolution requires the possibility for monads to reincarnate into the bodies of (...)
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  2. Teresa Obolevitch, Faith and Science in Russian Religious Thought, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):83-87.
    This is a review of Teresa Obolevitch's Faith and Science in Russian Religious Thought, which provides an intellectual history of the collaboration between fides and ratio in the course of the development of Russian thought, from its Byzantine origins to the twenty-first century. Obolevitch examines various approaches to combining faith and science in such eighteenth-century thinkers as Mikhail Lomonosov and Gregory Skovoroda, the nineteenth-century thinkers Victor Kudryavtsev-Platonov, Dimitrii Golubinsky, Sergei Glagolev, the Schellingian Peter Chaadaev, the Slavophiles Alexei Khomyakov and Ivan (...)
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  3. Nikolai Lossky’s Evolutionary Metaphysics of Reincarnation.Frédéric Tremblay - 2020 - Sophia 59 (4):733-753.
    The Russian philosopher Nikolai Onufrievich Lossky adhered to an evolutionary metaphysics of reincarnation according to which the world is constituted of immortal souls or monads, which he calls ‘substantival agents.’ These substantival agents can evolve or devolve depending on the goodness or badness of their behavior. Such evolution requires the possibility for monads to reincarnate into the bodies of creatures of a higher or of a lower level on the scala perfectionis. According to this theory, a substantival agent can evolve (...)
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  4. Alexandre Kojève, The Religious Metaphysics of Vladimir Solovyov, Translated by Ilya Merlin and Mikhail Pozdniakov, Palgrave Pivot, 2018. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2020 - Sophia: International Journal of Philosophy and Traditions 59:181-183.
    This is a review of Alexandre Kojève, The Religious Metaphysics of Vladimir Solovyov, translated by Ilya Merlin and Mikhail Pozdniakov, Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2018. This slim book is a translation of Kojève’s essay “La métaphysique religieuse de Vladimir Soloviev,” which was first published in two installments in the Revue d’histoire et de philosophie religieuses in 1934. The French text was itself based on Kojève’s doctoral dissertation, Die religiöse Philosophie Wladimir Solowjews, defended in Heidelberg under the direction of Karl Jaspers (...)
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  5. Ontological Axiology in Nikolai Lossky, Max Scheler, and Nicolai Hartmann.Frederic Tremblay - 2019 - In Moritz Kalckreuth, Gregor Schmieg & Friedrich Hausen (eds.), Nicolai Hartmanns Neue Ontologie und die Philosophische Anthropologie: Menschliches Leben in Natur und Geist. Berlin, Germany: pp. 193-232.
    The prominent Russian philosopher Nikolai Lossky and his ex-student Nicolai Hartmann shared many metaphysical and epistemological views, and Lossky is likely to have influenced Hartmann in adopting several of them. But, in the case of axiological issues, it appears that Lossky also borrowed from the axiologies of Hartmann and the latter's Cologne colleague, Max Scheler. The links between the theories of values of Scheler and Hartmann have been studied abundantly, but never in relation to Lossky. In this paper, I examine (...)
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  6. Russian Leibnizianism.Frederic Tremblay - 2019 - In Lloyd Strickland & Julia Weckend (eds.), Leibniz's Legacy and Impact. Routledge.
    Leibniz’s philosophy enjoyed a Russian fandom that endured from the eighteenth century to the death of the last exiled Russian philosophers in the twentieth century. There was, to begin with, Leibniz’s direct impact on Peter the Great and on the scientific development of Saint Petersburg. Then there was, still in the eighteenth century, Mikhail Lomonosov, who was sent to study with Christian Wolff in Marburg, and who came back to Saint Petersburg with a watered-down Leibnizian worldview, which he applied to (...)
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  7. Russian Neo-Kantianism: An External Perspective.Vladimir N. Belov & Tatyana V. Salnikova - 2018 - Kantian Journal 37 (2):90-95.
  8. Kyiv in the Global Biblical World: Reflections of KTA Professors From the Second Half of the 19th and Early 20th Centuries.Sergiy Golovashchenko - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:37-59.
    The focus of this article is the global and European experience of the reception, assimilation, and social application of the Bible, reproduced in the works of a number of prominent Kyiv Theological Academy (KTA) representatives from the second half of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The analysis specifically covers the works of professors Stefan Solskyi, Kharysym Orda, Nikolai Drozdov, Afanasii Bulgakov, Mykola Makkaveiskyi, Vasylii Pevnytskyi, Arsenii Tsarevskyi, Volodymyr Rybinskyi, Dmytro Bohdashevskyi, and Aleksandr Glagolev. The author uses the metaphor of (...)
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  9. “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy Intellectual Space” as a Manifestation of Intercultural Communications.Svitlana Kagamlyk - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:61-82.
    Based upon the Ukrainian hierarchs’ epistolary legacy, the article analyzes characteristic features of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy intellectual space, which was created by Academy alumni of different generations and various hierarchy levels. The author establishes that the closest relations were between correspondents belonging to the same or almost same hierarchy level and who were bonded together by the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy educational system and school comradeship, eventually obtained high positions in the hierarchy. Communication within the boundaries of individual centers (the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, the (...)
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  10. Hermann Cohen: Russian Obituaries From 1918.Modest A. Kolerov - 2018 - Kantian Journal 37 (2):58-63.
  11. Kantian Ethical Humanism in Late Imperial Russia.Thomas Nemeth - 2018 - Kantian Journal 37 (3):56-76.
  12. Kyiv Theological Academy Professors at the Beginning of the 20th Century: At the Intersection of Cultures.Liudmyla Pastushenko - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:97-116.
    This article attempts to reveal intercultural connections at the Kyiv Theological Academy at the beginning of the 20th century by reconstructing the spiritual biographies of two theological academy professors: Archimandrite (later, Archbishop of Berlin and Germany) Tykhon (Tymofii Liashchenko) and Petro Kudriavtsev. The article demonstrates how different cultural traditions intersected and combined in the spiritual experience of these figures. The author of the article argues that, as a result of revolutionary events in 1917–1919, both Kyiv Theological Academy professors experienced transformations (...)
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  13. Thomas Nemeth, Kant in Imperial Russia Cham: Springer, 2017 Pp. Ix+389 ISBN 9783319529134 £92.00. [REVIEW]Frederic Tremblay - 2018 - Kantian Review 23 (3):510-513.
    This is a review of Thomas Nemeth's Kant in Imperial Russia, Cham: Springer, 2017. It gives a rundown of the contents of the book, which may be considered the definitive, comprehensive, and authoritative overview of the Kantrezeption in pre-Soviet Russia in the English language. The book proceeds chronologically, starting from Kant's days up to the Bolshevik Revolution, examining well-known and lesser-known Russian philosophers and thinkers as well as figures of other nationalities who contributed to the dissemination of Kant's ideas in (...)
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  14. Legal Consciousness at the Early Stage of Personality Development From the Perspective of Russian Neo-Kantian Philosophy of Pedagogy.Maxim V. Vorobiev - 2018 - Kantian Journal 37 (2):46-57.
  15. Znajomość postaci i idei rosyjskiego neokantyzmu w Polsce.Barbara Czardybon & Władimir N. Biełow - 2017 - Diametros 52:1-22.
    The article deals with the main tendencies in the studies of Russian neo-Kantianism in Poland. Although the number and quality of research in the history of Russian neo-Kantianism still cannot be equated with those of the history of German neo-Kantianism, the situation of these studies is constantly changing for the better. The authors mark the undeniable progress in the studies of Russian neo-Kantianism in Poland in the recent years: there are monographs, articles, collections, research projects on particular thinkers or themes (...)
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  16. Ilona Svetlikova, The Moscow Pythagoreans: Mathematics, Mysticism, and Anti-Semitism in Russian Symbolism, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 184 Pp. [REVIEW]Tremblay Frederic - 2017 - Canadian-American Slavic Studies 51 (1):167-170.
    This is a review of an interdisciplinary work of intellectual history on the Moscow philosophical-mathematical school. The author, Ilona Svetlikova, is primarily interested in the thought of the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century mathematician and philosopher Nikolai Bugaev, of his son Boris Bugaev — better known under his nom de plume Andrei Belyi —, of Nikolai Bugaev’s student Pavel Nekrasov, and of other disciples of Bugaev, especially Vissarion Alekseev, the Baron Mikhail Taube, and Pavel Florensky. The book explores the views (...)
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  17. The Defects of Bergson's Epistemology and Their Consequences on His Metaphysics.Nikolai Lossky & Frederic Tremblay - 2017 - Studies in East European Thought 69 (1):17-24.
    This is a translation from the Russian of Nikolai Lossky’s “Heдocтaтки гнoceoлoгiи Бepгcoнa и влiянie иxъ нa eгo мeтaфизикy” (The Defects of Bergson’s Epistemology and Their Consequences on His Metaphysics), which was published in the journal Boпpocы филocoфiи и пcиxoлoгiи (Questions of Philosophy and Psychology) in 1913. In this article, Lossky criticizes Bergson’s epistemological dualism, which completely separates intuition from reason, and which rejects reason in favor of intuition. For Bergson, reality is continuous, indivisible, fluid, etc., and reason distorts it (...)
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  18. Henri Bergson, Les Deux Sources de la Morale Et de la Religion, Félix Alcan, Paris, 1932.Nikolai Lossky & Frederic Tremblay - 2017 - Studies in East European Thought 69 (1):25-27.
    This is a translation from the Russian of Nikolai Lossky’s review of Henri Bergson, Les deux sources de la morale et de la religion (1932). The review was published in the Parisian émigré journal Новый Град (Cité nouvelle) in 1932. In this review, Lossky criticizes Bergson for leaving some key problems of the philosophy of religion unresolved, namely that of God’s relation to the world (theism vs. pantheism), that of immortality, as well as that of evil. He also criticizes Bergson’s (...)
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  19. THE-MOST-IMPORTANT AND THE LAST GOD: ONTOTHEOLOGIES OF LEV SHESTOV AND MARTIN HEIDEGGER.Mykhailo Minakov - 2017 - НАУКОВІ ЗАПИСКИ НаУКМА 192:22-28.
  20. Mrówczyński Van Allen A., Obolevitch, T., Rokek, P. Beyond Modernity. Russian Religious Philosophy and Post-Secularism. [REVIEW]Andrey Pukhaev - 2017 - Folia Petropolitana 6:118-119.
  21. Nikolai Lossky and Henri Bergson.Frédéric Tremblay - 2017 - Studies in East European Thought 69 (1):3-16.
    The twentieth century Russian philosopher Nikolai Lossky was one of the earliest and most important proponents—but also critics—of Bergson’s philosophy in Russia at a time when many Russian philosophers were preoccupied with the same complex of philosophical questions and answers that Bergson was addressing. Thus, if only from the standpoint of intellectual history, Lossky is central to the study of the reception of Bergson in Russia. In this article, I present the principal historical links, points of agreement between Bergson and (...)
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  22. Vladimir Solovyov, Nicolai Hartmann, and Levels of Reality.Frédéric Tremblay - 2017 - Axiomathes 27 (2):133-146.
    One of the trademarks of Nicolai Hartmann’s ontology is his theory of levels of reality. Hartmann drew from many sources to develop his version of the theory. His essay “Die Anfänge des Schichtungsgedankens in der alten Philosophie” testifies of the fact that he drew from Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus. But this text was written relatively late in Hartmann’s career, which suggests that his interest in the theories of levels of the ancients may have been retrospective. In “Nicolai Hartmann und seine (...)
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  23. On the Phenomenological Philosophy in Russia.Marina F. Bykova - 2016 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 54 (1):1-7.
  24. Husserl’s Transcendental-Phenomenological Idealism.Nikolai Lossky, Maria Cherba & Frederic Tremblay - 2016 - Husserl Studies 32 (2):167-182.
    This is a translation from Russian to English of Nikolai Onufriyevich Lossky’s “Tpaнcцeндeнтaльнo-фeнoмeнoлoгичecкiй идeaлизмъ Гyccepля”, published in the émigré journal Пyть in 1939. In this article, Lossky presents and criticizes Husserl’s transcendental idealism. Like many successors of Husserl’s “Göttingen School,” Lossky interprets Husserl’s transcendental idealism as a Neo-Kantian idealism and he criticizes it on the ground that it leads to a form of solipsism. In light of his own epistemology and his metaphysical system, he also claims that, although Husserl is (...)
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  25. Edmund Husserl, Logical Investigations. Volume I. Prolegomena to Pure Logic: Translation From the German Authorized by the Author by E. A. Berstein, Edition and Preface by Semyon L. Frank. Editions ‘Obrazovanie’, St. Petersburg, 1909, 224 P. [REVIEW]Nikolai Lossky, Maria Cherba & Frederic Tremblay - 2016 - Husserl Studies 32 (2):165–166.
    This is a translation from Russian to English of Nikolai Onufriyevich Lossky’s review of the first Russian translation of volume one of Husserl’s Logische Untersuchungen, which was translated by E. A. Berstein and published in 1909 by a Petersburgian editor. The review appeared in the Muscovite philosophical journal Pyccкaя мыcль in 1909. In this short text, Lossky expresses his agreement with Husserl’s early anti-psychologism in logic. He also manifests his stance against logical and axiological relativism and naturalism. As an ontological (...)
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  26. All Things Are Possible: The Life of Lev Shestov.Richard Mather - 2016
    In 1936, Jewish-Russian philosopher Lev Shestov was invited by the Histadrut to give a series of lectures in Eretz Israel. He was warmly received by audiences in Jerusalem, Haifa and Tel Aviv. But Shestov and his writings are now largely forgotten. Here is his story.
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  27. La teoría histórico-cultural de Vygotski desde una perspectiva fenomenológica.Jorge Montesó-Ventura - 2016 - Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 13:107-126.
    Many times we have discussed about the appropriateness of situating to Vygotski in the Olympus of psychology. Even today, 80 years later, his theories continue creating as many supporters, defenders of his originality, as effusive critics who accuse the methodological shortcomings of his work. In our view, one of the shortcomings that have accused more his work is the lack of a solid theoretical foundation that endows meaning with the available host of data and results. Therefore, the objective of this (...)
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  28. Husserl, Bakhtin, and the Other I. Or: Mikhail M. Bakhtin – a Husserlian?Carina Pape - 2016 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 5 (2):271-289.
    Mikhail Bakhtin aimed to invent a phenomenology of the self-experience and of the experience of the other in his early work. In order to realize such a phenomenology he combined different approaches he called idealism and materialism / naturalism. The first one he linked to Edmund Husserl, but did hardly name him directly concerning his phenomenology. Does this intersubjective phenomenology give a hint that Bakhtin used Husserlian ideas more than considered yet? Or did they both invent similar ideas independently from (...)
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  29. Nikolai Lossky’s Reception and Criticism of Husserl.Frédéric Tremblay - 2016 - Husserl Studies 32 (2):149-163.
    Nikolai Lossky is key to the history of the Husserl-Rezeption in Russia. He was the first to publish a review of the Russian translation of Husserl’s first volume of the Logische Untersuchungen that appeared in 1909. He also published a presentation and criticism of Husserl’s transcendental idealism in 1939. An English translation of both of Lossky’s publications is offered in this volume for the first time. The present paper, which is intended as an introduction to these documents, situates Lossky within (...)
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  30. Hermann Cohens Konzept der Anthropodizee in der Sicht Jacob Gordins.Nina Dmitrieva - 2015 - Kantian Journal (3(ENG)):78-86.
    The paper focuses on the problem of anthropodicy in the philosophical system of Hermann Cohen and its interpretation by Jacob Gordin (1896—1947). Gordin was one of the last followers of Cohen in Russia. He developes his interpretation in the lecture “Anthropodicy”, which was given in the Philosophical Circle at the Petrograd University in December 1921. For the study of the problem of anthropodicy he was apparently inspired by the discussions at the Free Philosophical Association in 1919—1921. Gordin places Cohen’s concept (...)
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  31. Berdyaev's Moscow: A Philosophical Investigation of Local History.Aleksei A. Kara-Murza - 2015 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 53 (4):338-351.
    Based on considerable factual material, the author establishes Berdyaev's Moscow addresses and shows how Berdyaev's Moscow environment related to different stages of his philosophical work and public life.
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  32. Forum Für Osteuropäische Ideen- Und Zeitgeschichte. 18. Jahrgang, Heft 2: Simon Frank Als Philosophischer Vermittler Zwischen Ost Und West. [REVIEW]Leonid Luks (ed.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since 1997, FORUM is an integral part of the journal landscape of European Studies. In addition to facts of contemporary history, it offers deep insights into the history of ideas, reflects current discussions, and provides reviews of books on Central and Eastern European history. Especially on the history of ideas and contemporary history it offers more than ›just‹ history--e.g. interdisciplinary discussions by political scientists, literary, legal, and economic scholars and philosophers. FORUM sees itself as a bridge between East and West. (...)
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  33. The Young Losev as Phenomenologist.Thomas Nemeth - 2015 - Studies in East European Thought 67 (3-4):249-264.
    The two names most closely associated with phenomenology in early twentieth century Russia are Gustav Špet and Aleksej Losev. However, is that judgment warranted with regard to Losev? In just what way can we look on him as a phenomenologist? Losev himself, in the mid-1920s, employed the expression “dialectical phenomenology,” seeing phenomenology as an initial descriptive method to ascertain essences. He was sharply critical of its self-limitation in disavowing all explanation as metaphysical. Yet, earlier that decade Losev approved of Husserl’s (...)
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  34. “Union of Russian Royal People” in Emigration and Plans of Organization of “Spring Trip” to USSR. Project of I. I. Sikorsky. [REVIEW]A. V. Seregin - 2015 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 4 (3):187.
  35. G. P. Fedotov About the National Character in the History of Russia.O. D. Volkogonova - 2015 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 4 (4):247.
    The article deals with the concept of the Russian national type of personality by G. P. Fedotov. The author finds the connection between Fedotov’s views and the theory of moderate social constructivism, according to which the formation of nation by elite can be successful only if it comes in accordance with geographical and historical ‘landscapes‘. Russian type of personality is seen as a unity of two polar characters - ‘the muscovite‘ and ‘the intelligent‘. The author points out that Fedotov considers (...)
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  36. Losev, Aleksei., The Dialectic of Artistic Form. Translated by Oleg Bychkov. [REVIEW]Robert Bird - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (1):176-178.
  37. Arjakovsky, Antoine., The Way: Religious Thinkers of the Russian Emigration in Paris and Their Journal 1925–1940. [REVIEW]Virgil Nemoianu - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (4):863-865.
  38. Mind The Gap: Gurdjieffian Institutes with Ouspensky, Roles, Nicoll, Fenwick.Joanna Nicholls-Parker - 2014 - Smashwords.
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  39. THE RUSSIAN MENTALITY.Marek Styczyński - 2014 - Hybris, Revista de Filosofí­A (27):058-071.
    THE RUSSIAN MENTALITY The present essay is the conclusion of my two books devoted to Nicolas Berdjaev’s religious philosophy: Amor futuri albo eschatologia zrealizowana Studia nad myślą Mikołaja Bierdiajewa (Amor Futuri or Eschatology Realised Studies on the Thought of Nicolas Berdjaev), [Styczyński 1992] and Umiłowanie przyszłości albo filozofia spraw ostatecznych. Studia nad filozofią Mikołaja Bierdiajewa (Adulation for the Future or the Philosophy of the Ultimate Matters Studies on the Thought of Nicolas Berdjaev), [Styczyński 2001]. The differences between them are mentioned (...)
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  40. The Heritage of Gnosis in Russian Religious Thought.Sławomir Mazurek - 2013 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 58.
    Experts are unanimous that there are many affinities between gnostic thought and Russian religious philosophy of the first half of XXth century and that the latter was in different ways influenced by the former. So far, however, there are not many studies on this particularly subject. The paper, in an attempt to fill this gap, gives a comparative description of the ancient gnosis and the Russian religious philosophy. The author points out similarities and differences between these two great spiritual movements, (...)
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  41. Leibniz in Russian.Olga B. Fedorova & Dimitri A. Bayuk - 2012 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Komma Und Kathedrale: Tradition, Bedeutung Und Herausforderung der Leibniz-Edition. De Gruyter. pp. 213-224.
  42. An Uneasily Classified Philosopher Vladimir Jankélévitch.P. Bendlová - 2010 - Filozofia 65:317-320.
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  43. Mensch und Geschichte: Zur ‘anthropologischen Wende’ im russischen Neukantianismus.Nina Dmitrieva - 2010 - Etica E Politica 12 (2):82-103.
    The paper focuses on the problem of the “anthropological turn” in Russian Neo- Kantianism. There are three sources of this “anthropological turn”. The first one is the concept of man in German Neo-Kantianism which was developed on the basis of Kant’s ethics. The second one is the influence of Russian culture and history. The third is the state of Russian philosophy at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. The Russian Neo-Kantians reflected closely on the (...)
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  44. The Ego: The Problem and the Term as Treated by Russian Philosophy.Victor Molchanov - 2009 - Studies in East European Thought 61 (2-3):181-188.
    The starting point of the investigation is the correspondence between the term and concept of Ego ("I") and the various types of experience. Two main ways of introducing and applying of the term "I" (Ego) in Russian philosophy are investigated from the semantic-analytical point of view. The first takes the Ego as initially existed either as a spiritual substance or a given form uniting experiences. This way of treating is realized in L. Lopatin's and V. Soloviev's philosophical teachings. The second (...)
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  45. Nicolai Berdyaev’s „Communist” Irresolutions.Janusz Dobieszewski - 2008 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 3 (4):55-67.
    The issue of Communism, especially the Russian Communism, constitutes one of the most important and persistent problems in the thought of N. Berdyaev who addressed the issue in an almost obsessive manner. In the second half of the 19th century, the ideas of revolution and Communism were becoming increasingly important for virtually all groups of the Russian intelligentsia and were occupying the brightest minds of Russian culture: Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Leontyev, Solovyov and Fedorov. For Berdyaev, the Russian revolution would be an (...)
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  46. Overconfessional Syncretic Mystical Currents in Russia and Germany at the Beginning of the ХХ Century: about the Problem of Influence of Religious Purposes on the Spiritual Choice among Intellectuals.E. V. Kryazheva-Kartsieva - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:487-500.
    Doubtless interest for a modern science represents the answer to a question on the reasons of passion among intellectuals in Russia and Germany for overconfessional currents like theosophy and antroposophy. The author distinguishes the spiritual crisis like the most important prerequisite of passion for works of E. Blavatskaja and R. Shtajner. E. V. Kriageva-Kartseva compares the activity of different theosophical and antroposophical societies in two countries at the beginning of the ХХ century and draws some conclusions. For example, the author (...)
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  47. An Idea Of The Universal Redemption In The Russian Religious Philosophy.Sławomir Mazurek - 2008 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 3 (4):89-104.
    The paper is a reconstruction and an analysis of eschatological conceptions formulated in the Russian religious philosophy during the first half of the 20th century. Among the representatives of this trend in the Russian philosophy were N. Berdyaev, L. Shestov, L. Karsavin, S. Frank, M. Łosski, and S. Bułgakov, who were preceded by the late 19th century writers like V. Soloviov, and M. Fedorov. Most of the Russian conceptions of eschatology of that time expressed variously understood conception of an universal (...)
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  48. Shestov's Perspective on the Definition of Philosophy.Fan Yuan-gan & Shang-de Li - 2008 - Modern Philosophy 6:125-130.
    What is the philosophy? Husserl's view that philosophy is a reflection of Russian religious philosopher Shestov thought that philosophy is a struggle. In fact, this is the rational philosophical thinking of the opposition and the Bible. Rational thinking based on human philosophy is "reasonable person" understanding, through the "logic" behind the means to search for things based on that philosophy is "love of wisdom." Never mind the Bible are "divine" and starting the "Thunder and Lightning" as their "logic", the philosophy (...)
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  49. Russian Neo-Kantianism: Marburg in Russia. Historical-philosophical Essays.Nina Dmitrieva - 2007 - Moscow, Russia: ROSSPEN.
  50. Three Russian Thinkers.Valentin Bazhanov, Aza Takho-Godi & Maria Bocharova - 2006 - Philosophy Pathways 118.
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