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  1. Interpretations of the concepts of resilience and evolution in the philosophy of Leibniz.Vincenzo De Florio - manuscript
    In this article I interpret resilience and evolution in view of the philosophy of Leibniz. First, I discuss resilience as a substance’s or a monad’s “quantity of essence” — its “degree of perfection” — which I express as the quality of the Whole with respect to the sum of the qualities of the Parts. Then I discuss evolution, which I interpret here as the autopoietic Principle that sets Itself in motion and creates all reality, including Itself. This Principle may be (...)
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  2. The Early Modern Rationalists and the Substantial Form: From Natural Philosophy to Metaphysics.Valtteri Viljanen - manuscript
    This paper argues that, contrary to what one might think, early modern rationalism displays an increasing and well-grounded sensitivity to certain metaphysical questions the substantial form was designed to answer – despite the fact that the notion itself was in such disrepute, and emphatically banished from natural philosophy. This main thesis is established by examining the thought of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz through the framework constituted by what have been designated as the two aspects, metaphysical and physical, of the substantial (...)
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  3. Concepts of "Time" and "Place" in Leibniz's Philosophy.Muhammed Safian & Abdullah Amini - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 56.
    Leibniz initially believed in the absoluteness of time and place, but later he changed his idea. His true and final view is that time and place are relative and subjective concepts, whereas Newton believed that they are absolute and have a real and objective existence independent of other phenomena. In his correspondence with Samuel Clark, he refers to the weak points of the views of Newton and Clark and presents several philosophical and theological arguments to reject them. Time and place (...)
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  4. God, Beauty, and Evil in Leibniz's Best of All Possible Worlds.Eric Wampler - unknown - Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 18.
  5. The Space Between and the Space Within: On the Definition, Conception, and Function of Space in Leibniz's Late Metaphysics.Julia Bursten - forthcoming - Think.
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  6. Power, Harmony, and Freedom: Debating Causation in 18th Century Germany.Corey Dyck - forthcoming - In Frederick Beiser & Brandon Look (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century German Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    As far as treatments of causation are concerned, the pre-Kantian 18th century German context has long been dismissed as a period of uniform and unrepentant Leibnizian dogmatism. While there is no question that discussions of issues relating to causation in this period inevitably took Leibniz as their point of departure, it is certainly not the case that the resulting positions were in most cases dogmatically, or in some cases even recognizably, Leibnizian. Instead, German theorists explored a range of positions regarding (...)
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  7. 18th Century German Philosophy prior to Kant.Corey W. Dyck & Brigitte Sassen - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  8. Immortal animals, subtle bodies, or separated souls: the afterlife in Leibniz, Wolff, and their followers.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review.
    In eighteenth-century post-Leibnizian German philosophy, the debate on immortality did not concern only the fate of the soul after death but also the fate of the body. Leibniz had famously maintained that no animal ever dies, for the soul is never entirely deprived of its living body. In spite of Bilfinger’s almost isolated defense, this doctrine never became dominant, even among Leibniz’s followers. Christian Wolff, long considered a mere popularizer of Leibniz’s philosophy, departed from this account of immortality and replaced (...)
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  9. Leibniz y Boyle sobre la noción de naturaleza: un debate póstumo acerca de los fundamentos del mecanicismo en "De ipsa natura".Rodolfo Fazio - forthcoming - Filosofia Unisinos:1-13.
    En el presente trabajo estudiamos el concepto de naturaleza en Leibniz y Boyle y la fundamentación que a partir de dicha noción cada uno ofrece del mecanicismo. De modo más específico, proponemos que De ipsa natura de Leibniz se articula como un debate póstumo con A Free Enquiry into the Vulgarly Received Notion of Nature de Boyle, siendo el objetivo inicial del texto leibniziano revisar la concepción boyleana de naturaleza y ofrecer una fundamentación alternativa del mecanicismo que permita introducir una (...)
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  10. The Discreteness of Matter: Leibniz on Plurality and Part-Whole Priority.Adam Harmer - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Leibniz argues against Descartes’s conception of material substance based on considerations of unity. I examine a key premise of Leibniz’s argument, what I call the Plurality Thesis—the claim that matter (i.e. extension alone) is a plurality of parts. More specifically, I engage an objection to the Plurality Thesis stemming from what I call Material Monism—the claim that the physical world is a single material substance. I argue that Leibniz can productively engage this objection based on his view that matter is (...)
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  11. Guía Comares de Leibniz (Monadología).Nicolás Juan Antonio (ed.) - forthcoming - Comares.
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  12. LA SUSTANCIA COMPUESTA Y EL VÍNCULO SUSTANCIAL EN LEIBNIZ.Cabañas Leticia - forthcoming - In Nicolás Juan Antonio (ed.), Guía Comares de Leibniz (Monadología). Granada: Comares.
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  13. Leibniz on Possibilia, Creation, and the Reality of Essences.Peter Myrdal, Arto Repo & Valtteri Viljanen - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
    This paper reconsiders Leibniz’s conception of the nature of possible things and offers a novel interpretation of the actualization of possible substances. This requires analyzing a largely neglected notion, the reality of individual essences. Thus far scholars have tended to construe essences as representational items in God’s intellect. We acknowledge that finite essences have being in the divine intellect but insist that they are also grounded in the infinite essence of God, as limitations of it. Indeed, we show that it (...)
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  14. Essence and Existence in Leibniz's Ontology.Lorenzo Pena - forthcoming - Synthesis Philosophica.
    The concept of every real thing from all eternity contains the unavoidability of its existence before the divine decision. Thus every complete concept of a real thing contains the property of being such that the thing will exist if a created universe exists. Then a thing's existence cannot be external to its concept. There is bound to be more in the concept of something that exists than in that of "something" that does not-since existence is explained through the quidditative property (...)
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  15. Leibnizian Pluralism and Bradleian Monism: A Question of Relations.Pauline Phemister - forthcoming - Studia Leibnitiana.
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  16. The Principles of Contradiction, Sufficient Reason, and Identity of Indiscernibles.Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra - forthcoming - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press.
    Leibniz was a philosopher of principles: the principles of Contradiction, of Sufficient Reason, of Identity of Indiscernibles, of Plenitude, of the Best, and of Continuity are among the most famous Leibnizian principles. In this article I shall focus on the first three principles; I shall discuss various formulations of the principles (sect. 1), what it means for these theses to have the status of principles or axioms in Leibniz’s philosophy (sect. 2), the fundamental character of the Principles of Contradiction and (...)
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  17. Requisite theory in Leibniz= Teoría de los requisitos en Leibniz.Julian Velarde Lombrana - forthcoming - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy.
  18. Het spatium: Leibniz en Deleuze over ruimte en uitgebreidheid.Florian Vermeiren - forthcoming - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie.
    This paper aims to show that Deleuze’s ideas on space and extension are heavily in debt to Leibniz. The focus is on chapter five, ‘the Asymmetrical Synthesis of the Sensible’, of Difference and Repetition. Concepts such as ‘intensive magnitude’, ‘distance’, ‘order’ and most importantly ‘spatium’ are shown to have their origin in Leibniz’s philosophy. In order to do so, the article starts with Leibniz’s critique on Cartesian mechanics and how this leads Leibniz to a conception of space that goes beyond (...)
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  19. Leibniz's Exoteric Philosophy.John Whipple - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  20. How to inhabit the best of all possible worlds? Environmental responsibility in the light of Leibniz's conception of time.Sabine Baldin - 2023 - In Hiroshi Abe, Matthias Fritsch & Mario Wenning (eds.), Environmental Philosophy and East Asia: Nature, Time, Responsibility.
  21. Localizing Violations of the Principle of Sufficient Reason—Leibniz on the Modal Status of the PSR.Sebastian Bender - 2022 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 4 (1):11.
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason —the principle that everything has a reason—plays a central role in Leibniz’s philosophical system. It is rather difficult, however, to determine what Leibniz’s attitude towards the modal status of the PSR is. The prevailing view is that Leibniz takes the PSR to be true necessarily. This paper develops a novel interpretation and argues that Leibniz’s PSR is a contingent principle. It also discusses whether a merely contingent PSR can do the metaphysical heavy lifting that Leibniz (...)
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  22. Common Notions and Immortality in Digby and the Early Leibniz.Andreas Blank - 2022 - In Han Thomas Adriaenssen & Laura Georgescu (eds.), The Philosophy of Kenelm Digby (1603–1665). Cham, Switzerland: pp. 59–87.
  23. God Can Do Otherwise: A Defense of Act Contingency in Leibniz's Mature Period.Dylan Flint - 2022 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 39 (3):235-256.
    This paper locates a source of contingency for Leibniz in the fact that God can do otherwise, absolutely speaking. This interpretative line has been previously thought to be a dead-end because it appears inconsistent with Leibniz’s own conception of God, as the ens perfectissimum, or the most perfect being (Adams, 1994). This paper points out that the best argument on offer which seeks to demonstrate this inconsistency fails. The paper then argues that the supposition that God does otherwise implies for (...)
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  24. La idea de continuidad en las filosofías de Leibniz y Peirce.Jorge Alejandro Flórez Restrepo & Jesús Esteven Arias Cardona - 2022 - Pensamiento 78 (298 S. Esp):841-861.
    El presente artículo ofrece un análisis del concepto de continuidad, tal como fue desarrollado por dos de sus principales exponente, Leibniz y Peirce. Comienza por definir el significado del concepto, señalando las diferentes propiedades del continuum identificadas en ambos autores. Después señala las consecuencias y aplicaciones filosóficas que el concepto tiene para ambos filósofos, en especial para la ontología. En primer lugar, expone lo que Leibniz llamó la ley de continuidad y sus diferentes versiones. Luego, se habla de lo que (...)
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  25. Leibniz on Agential Contingency and Inclining but not Necessitating Reasons.Juan Garcia - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):149-164.
    I argue for a novel interpretation of Leibniz’s conception of the kind of contingency that matters for freedom, which I label ‘agential contingency.’ In brief, an agent is free to the extent that she determines herself to do what she judges to be the best of several considered options that she could have brought about had she concluded that these options were best. I use this novel interpretation to make sense of Leibniz’s doctrine that the reasons that explain free actions (...)
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  26. Mereological Nihilism and Simple Substance in Leibniz.Adam Harmer - 2022 - Res Philosophica 99 (1):39-65.
    Leibniz famously argues that there must be simple substances, since there are composites, and a composite is nothing but a collection of simples. I reconstruct Leibniz’s argument, showing that it relies on a commitment to mereological nihilism. I show further that Leibniz endorses mereological nihilism as early as the 1680s and offers both direct and indirect support for this commitment: indirect support via the notion of unity and direct support via the notion of persistence. I then assess the alignment of (...)
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  27. The Labyrinth of the Continuum: Leibniz, the Wolffians, and Kant on Matter and Monads.Anja Jauernig - 2022 - In Karl Schafer (ed.), The Sensible and Intelligible Worlds: New Essays on Kant's Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 185-216.
    The problem at the center of this essay is how one can reconcile the continuity of space with a monadological theory of matter, according to which matter is ultimately composed of simple elements, a problem that greatly exercised Leibniz, the Wolffians, and Kant. The underlying purpose of this essay is to illustrate my reading of Kant’s philosophical development, and of his relation to the Wolffians and Leibniz, according to which, (a), this development was fueled by ‘home-grown’ problems that arose within (...)
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  28. Leibniz’s Philosophical Dream of Rational and Intuitive Enlightenment.Paul Lodge - 2022 - Dialogue and Universalism 32 (1):203-219.
    This paper is a new translation and interpretation of the essay by Leibniz which has come to be known as “Leibniz’s Philosophical Dream.” Leibniz used many different literary styles throughout his career, but “Leibniz’s Philosophical Dream” is unique insofar as it combines apparent autobiography with a dreamscape. The content is also somewhat surprising. The essay is reminiscent of Plato, insofar as Leibniz describes a transition from existence in a cave to a more enlightened mode of being outside of it. But, (...)
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  29. Anthologie du Guide de Maïmonide par Leibniz.Moïse Maïmonide, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Lloyd Strickland & Walter Hilliger - 2022 - Cercle Hilliger.
    La traduction latine du livre de Maïmonide Moreh Nevukhim | Guide des égarés, a été l'ouvrage juif le plus influent des derniers millénaires (Di Segni, 2019 ; Rubio, 2006 ; Wohlman, 1988, 1995 ; Kohler, 2017). Elle marqua le début de la scolastique, fille du judaïsme élevée par des penseurs juifs, selon l'historien Heinrich Graetz (Geschichte der Juden, L. 6, Leipzig 1861, p. xii). Imprimée par la première presse mécanique de Gutenberg, son influence en Occident s'étendit jusqu'au Vème concile du (...)
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  30. Antología de la Guía de Maimónides por Leibniz. Maimonides, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Walter Hilliger & Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - Cercle Hilliger.
    La traducción al latín de la obra de Maimónides Moreh Nevukhim | Guía para Perplejos, ha sido la obra judía más influyente en los últimos milenios (Di Segni, 2019; Rubio, 2006; Wohlman, 1988, 1995; Kohler, 2017). Ésta marcó el comienzo de la escolástica, «hija del judaísmo nutrida por pensadores judíos, » según el historiador Heinrich Graetz (Geschichte der Juden, L. 6, Leipzig 1861, p. xii). Impresa por la primera imprenta mecánica de Gutenberg, su influencia en Occidente se extendió hasta el (...)
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  31. Following Leibniz through the labyrinth. [REVIEW]Christopher P. Noble - 2022 - Metascience 31 (3):431-434.
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  32. Thinking as Folding.Kyle Novak - 2022 - Philosophy Today 66 (4):745-762.
    Rosi Braidotti has recently argued that the emerging scholarship on posthumanism should employ what she calls nomadic thinking. Braidotti identifies Gilles Deleuze’s work on Spinoza as the genesis of posthumanist ontology, yet Deleuze’s claims about nomadic thinking or nomadology come from his work on Leibniz. I argue that for posthumanist thought to theorize subjectivity beyond the human, it must use nomadology to overcome ontology itself. To make my argument, I demonstrate that while Braidotti is correct about Spinoza’s influence on Deleuze, (...)
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  33. Leibniz on the Grounds of the Principle of Sufficient Reason.Owen Pikkert - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (3):566-589.
    I examine several alleged grounds of the principle of sufficient reason in Leibniz’s philosophy. These include the nature of a requisite and a sufficient condition, the nature of truth, and the nature of harmony. I argue that Leibniz does not ground the PSR in any of these ways. Instead, he is committed to a value-based grounds of the PSR: God creates the best possible world, and the fact that the PSR obtains in this world contributes to it being the best. (...)
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  34. Berkeley and Leibniz.Stephen Puryear - 2022 - In Samuel C. Rickless (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Berkeley. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 503-521.
    This chapter explores the relationship between the views of Leibniz and Berkeley on the fundamental nature of the created universe. It argues that Leibniz concurs with Berkeley on three key points: that in the final analysis there are only perceivers and their contents (subjective idealism), that there are strictly speaking no material or corporeal substances, and that bodies or sensible things reduce to the contents of perceivers (phenomenalism). It then reconstructs his central argument for phenomenalism, which rests on his belief (...)
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  35. In the Beginning Was Binary.Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - Church Times 8322.
  36. Fundamental Perception in Leibniz’s Philosophy and Contemporary Panpsychism.Matvey S. Sysoev - 2022 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 59 (3):202-219.
    This article examines the fundamental ontological significance that the category of perception has in philosophy of G.W. Leibniz, and establishes the connection between the category of perception and modern panpsychism. There is a problem of definition of protopsychic properties in modern panpsychism. The problem is expressed not only in the absence of such a definition, but also in the absence of a good strategy for finding possible candidates for the role of protopsychic property. To solve this problem, the author considers (...)
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  37. The ‘Necessity’ of Leibniz’s Rejection of Necessitarianism.Joseph Anderson - 2021 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 10 (1):75-91.
    In the Theodicy, Leibniz argues against two impious conceptions of God—a God who makes arbitrary choices and a God who doesn’t make choices at all. Many interpret Leibniz as navigating these dangers by positing a kind of non-Spinozistic necessitarianism. I examine passages from the Theodicy which reject not only blind necessitarianism but necessitarianism altogether. Leibniz thinks blind necessitarianism is dangerous due to the conception of God it entails and the implications for morality. Non-Spinozistic necessitarianism avoids many of these criticisms. Leibniz (...)
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  38. Leibniz on Time, Space, and Relativity.Richard Arthur - 2021 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    This book presents fresh interpretations of Gottfried Leibniz's theories of time, space, and the relativity of motion, based on a thorough examination of Leibniz's manuscripts as well as his published papers. These are analysed in historical context, but also with an eye to their contemporary relevance.
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  39. Practical Identity in Aristotle and Leibniz.Roberto Casales-García & Livia Bastos Andrade - 2021 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 50:51-77.
    El presente trabajo de investigación tiene por objetivo reconstruir la noción de identidad práctica tanto en Aristóteles como en Leibniz, a fin de mostrar en qué medida el hannoveriano es deudor del Estagirita y en qué medida se distingue una propuesta de la otra. Para lograr esto hacemos dos cosas: por un lado, analizamos la noción aristotélica de praxis y de agencia moral a la luz de su noción de habituación; por otro lado, damos cuenta de la dimensión práctica que (...)
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  40. Leibniz and Kant on Empirical Miracles: Rationalism, Freedom, and the Laws.Andrew Chignell - 2021 - In Brandon Look (ed.), Leibniz and Kant. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 320-354.
    Leibniz and Kant were heirs of a biblical theistic tradition which viewed miraculous activity in the world as both possible and actual. But both were also deep explanatory rationalists about the natural world: more committed than your average philosophical theologian to its thoroughgoing intelligibility. These dual sympathies—supernaturalist religion and empirical rationalism—generate a powerful tension across both philosophers’ systems, one that is most palpable in their accounts of empirical miracles—that is, events in nature that violate one or more of the natural (...)
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  41. Leibniz and Bolzano on conceptual containment.Jan Claas - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy (3):1-19.
    Philosophers often rely on the notion of conceptual containment and apply mereological terminology when they talk about the parts or constituents of a complex concept. In this paper, I explore two historical approaches to this general notion. In particular, I reconstruct objections Bernard Bolzano puts forward against a criterion that played a prominent role in the history of philosophy and that was endorsed, among others, by Leibniz. According to this criterion, a concept that represents objects contains all and only the (...)
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  42. Locke, Leibniz and the state space.Stephen Connelly - 2021 - McGill GLSA Research Series 1 (1).
    The article explores the relationship between Locke and Leibniz's account of space and how this impacts on their understanding of possibility, and particularly practical choices between possibilities within a modal space. Using Borges' short story 'Pierre Menard, author of the Quixote' it argues that Locke's acquiescence to absolute space severely restricts his account of the power to do things. Leibniz's retention of relative space permits a much richer account of possible, yet he binds these worlds together under a universal set (...)
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  43. The Notion of Vegetative Soul in the Leibniz-Stahl Controversy.François Duchesneau - 2021 - In Fabrizio Baldassarri & Andreas Blank (eds.), Vegetative Powers: The Roots of Life in Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Natural Philosophy. Springer. pp. 407-418.
    In the controversy that arose between Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Georg Ernst Stahl following the publication of the latter’s Theoria medica vera, both theoreticians strove to distance themselves from what they took to be the classical conception of the vegetative soul, while relating and partly reducing their opponent’s doctrine to it. I shall first attempt to establish their respective meanings for such a soul and the reasons why they would challenge the relevance of that notion for physiology. I shall then (...)
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  44. Leibniz’s Influence on Hermann Cohen’s Interpretation of Kant.Scott Edgar - 2021 - Kant E-Prints 16 (2):200-230.
    In the second edition of Hermann Cohen’s Kant’s Theory of Experience, he abandons the interpretation of Kant’s Anticipations of Perception that he gave in the first edition, in favourof a radically different one. On his early interpretation, the Anticipations is largely of psychological interest for its influence on, and continuing significance for, physiological psychology and psychophysics. But on his mature interpretation, it defends the superiority of a dynamic conception of nature over a mechanical conception. Further, on his early interpretation, Cohen (...)
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  45. Making an Appearance as Itself: Kant vs. Leibniz on Grounding Appearances.Kristina Engelhard - 2021 - In Camilla Serck-Hanssen & Beatrix Himmelmann (eds.), The Court of Reason: Proceedings of the 13th International Kant Congress. De Gruyter. pp. 863-872.
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  46. Leibniz on Unicorns.Dean Ericksen - 2021 - Philosophy Now 144:38-38.
    Saul Kripke may have argued that unicorns could not possibly exist, but if you’re personally unconvinced, you’d be in good company. When he wasn’t busy independently inventing infinitesimal calculus and devising his famous theodicy, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz found time to write about unicorns in what would become Protogaea.
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  47. Leibniz’s Appropriation of Spinoza’s Argument against Mind-Body Causation.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2021 - The Leibniz Review 31:35-57.
    In a 1687 letter to Arnauld, Leibniz draws on an argument against mind-body causation that is reminiscent of one from Spinoza’s Ethics. According to this argument, mind-body causation is impossible because of the lack of proportion between thoughts and motions. This paper aims to shed light on Leibniz’s use of Spinoza’s argument by reconstructing both its internal structure and its development in Leibniz’s later works. In particular, the reconstruction focuses on the new version of this argument that Leibniz adopts against (...)
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  48. Brandom's Leibniz.Zachary Micah Gartenberg - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102 (1):73-102.
    I discuss an objection by Margaret Wilson against Robert Brandom’s interpretation of Leibniz’s account of perceptual distinctness. According to Brandom, Leibniz holds that (i) the relative distinctness of a perception is a function of its inferentially articulated content and (ii) apperception, or awareness, is explicable in terms of degrees of perceptual distinctness. Wilson alleges that Brandom confuses ‘external deducibility’ from a perceptual state of a monad to the existence of properties in the world, with ‘internally accessible content’ for the monad (...)
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  49. Kant on the (alleged) Leibnizian misconception of the difference between sensible and intellectual representations.Anja Jauernig - 2021 - In Leibniz and Kant. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 177-210.
    Kant attacks the Leibnizians on various fronts but the objection that occurs most frequently in his writings is that they are committed to an untenable conception of the relation between sensible and intellectual representations. They regard the difference between intellectual and sensible representations as a merely ‘logical’ difference that concerns their form, namely, their different degrees of distinctness, while in truth it is a difference in kind that concerns their nature, origin, and content. In the first part of this essay, (...)
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  50. Leibniz on Bodies and Infinities: Rerum Natura and Mathematical Fictions.Mikhail G. Katz, Karl Kuhlemann, David Sherry & Monica Ugaglia - 2021 - Review of Symbolic Logic:1-31.
    The way Leibniz applied his philosophy to mathematics has been the subject of longstanding debates. A key piece of evidence is his letter to Masson on bodies. We offer an interpretation of this often misunderstood text, dealing with the status of infinite divisibility innature, rather than inmathematics. In line with this distinction, we offer a reading of the fictionality of infinitesimals. The letter has been claimed to support a reading of infinitesimals according to which they are logical fictions, contradictory in (...)
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